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5th Grade Scope and Sequence

5th Grade Scope and Sequence
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If you’re looking for information on what a 5th grade scope and sequence should look like, you’ve come to the right place. Knowing what to teach and when to teach it during the year can be incredibly helpful to homeschooling families. Since many lessons usually follow a suggested sequence that builds on each other, it’s important to have access to a fifth grade scope and sequence that provides as much information as possible.

Below is the Time4Learning 5th grade scope and sequence for each subject we offer. You’ll find tons of useful information including the number of chapters and lessons, as well as details on the concepts and skills your student will be learning this year.

5th Grade Math Scope & Sequence

Students will use Roman and Greek numerals.
Students will use numeric digits and words to read and write numbers up to the hundred billions.
Students will show numbers in standard and expanded form up to the billions place.
Students will compare and order numbers using place value chart and number lines.
Students will round numbers up to one billion and use concept of rounding to solve real-world problems.
Students will use estimation strategies to solve real-world problems in which they will find the sum and the difference.
Students will estimate and evaluate items for reasonableness and determine the reasonableness of given answers.
Students will add and subtract whole numbers.
Students will multiply whole numbers.
Students will solve multiplication problems that involve two-digit by two-digit multiplication as well as three-digit by two-digit multiplication.
Students will solve real-world problem involving estimation with two-by-two digit multiplication as well as three-digit by two-digit multiplication.
Students will determine the greatest common factor of given numbers.
Determine the least common multiple of given numbers.
Students will use exponents to solve problem.
Students will identify powers of 10 through the 6th power.
Students will use patterns when multiplying by powers of ten.
Students will explore exponents as repeated multiplication.
Students will divide to solve problems.
Students will use compatible numbers to estimate quotients.
Students will apply the divisibility rules of 2, 3, 5, 9, and 10 to various numbers.
Students will interpret remainders and apply the concepts in order to identify what remainders signify.
Students will use order of operations to solve problems.
Students will define and identify prime and composite numbers up to 50. Students will find the prime factorization of numbers up to 50.
Students will write factors of numbers using prime numbers only and prime factorization.
Students will solve real-life problems.
Students will understand that a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and one-tenth of what it represents in the place to its left.
Students will read and write numbers to the thousandths in written and standard form and show equivalencies between the two.
Students will identify the number and place on the number line to signify given decimals.
Students will use <, > and = to compare decimals through thousandths. Students will order decimals through thousands.
Students will round decimals to an identified place value and to the nearest half or whole number.
Students will add and subtract decimals.
Students will estimate sums and differences with decimals.
Students will multiply decimals by other decimals.
Students will divide decimals with decimals and whole number in both the divisor and dividend.
Students will estimate products and quotients using decimals.
Students will identify percents.
Students will find the percent of a number and solve real-world problems using percents.
Students will identify improper and mixed numbers and demonstrate their ability to find the equivalencies between the two.
Students will determine the least common denominator of fractions with unlike denominators.
Students will simplify fractions by find the lowest common denominator.
Students will find equivalent forms of fractions not including mixed numbers.
Students will compare and order fractions.
Students will round fractions to the nearest half or whole number.
Students will add fractions, not including mixed numbers, with like and unlike denominators.
Students will subtract fractions, not including mixed numbers, with like and unlike denominators.
Students will solve real-world problems involving subtracting fractions with unlike denominators.
Students will add mixed numbers with and without regrouping.
Students will subtract mixed numbers with and without regrouping.
Students will represent the product of two fractions using an area model.
Students will determine the effect of multiplying a whole number by a fraction less than 1 and by a fraction greater than 1.
Students will multiply fractions, not including mixed numbers, and simplify answers.
Students will solve problems involving multiplying a fraction by a mixed number, and multiplying a mixed number by a mixed number.
Students will model dividing whole numbers by unit fractions and unit fractions by whole numbers.
Students will solve real-world problems involving dividing with unit fractions.
Students will divide fractions, not including mixed numbers, by using reciprocals and simplify answers.
Students will estimate products and quotients using fractions.
Students will interpret a fraction as representing division.
Students will write fractions as decimals.
Students will demonstrate their understanding of the relationship between decimals and fractions and fractions to decimals and how they are equivalent to percents.
Students will learn fractions as ratios.
Students will find equivalent ratios.
Students will recognize the percent sign and understand percent as per hundred. Students will express equivalences between fractions, decimals and percentages and know common equivalencies.
Students will describe life situations using integers and identify integers on a number line.
Students will determine patterns in pictures and tables and describe the function rule.
Students will write and evaluate algebraic expressions.
Students will find the rule in real-world problems and identify function rules from tables.
Students will solve one-step equations with whole numbers, decimals and fractions involving addition.
Students will solve one-step equations with whole numbers, decimals, and fractions involving subtraction.
Students will solve one-step equations with whole numbers and decimals involving multiplication.
Students will solve one-step equations with whole numbers and decimals involving division.
Students will apply formulas to solve customary length problems. Students will identify the correct tools to use to solve customary length problems and apply concepts of estimation to arrive at answers.
Students will apply formulas to solve customary weight problems. Students will identify the correct tools to use to solve customary weight problems and apply concepts of estimation to arrive at answers.
Students will apply formulas to solve customary capacity problems. Students will identify the correct tools to use to solve customary capacity problems and apply concepts of estimation to arrive at answers.
Students will apply formulas involving temperatures in Fahrenheit degrees to solve real-life problems.
Students will learn about the metric system and learn how multiplying and dividing by ten affects the placement in the system.
Students will apply formulas to solve metric length problems. Students will identify the correct tools to use to solve metric length problems and apply concepts of estimation to arrive at answers.
Students will apply formulas to solve metric weight problems. Students will identify the correct tools to use to solve metric weight problems and apply concepts of estimation to arrive at answers.
Students will apply formulas to solve metric capacity problems. Students will identify the correct tools to use to solve metric capacity problems and apply concepts of estimation to arrive at answers.
Students will apply formulas involving temperatures in Celsius degrees to solve real-life problems.
Students will solve problems about elapsed time.
Students will solve problems showing elapsed time involving days, weeks, months, years and centuries.
Students will find perimeter of polygons and regular polygons with and without missing values.
Students will find the area of squares and rectangles.
Students will find the area of triangles.
Students will find the volume of cubes and rectangular prisms.
Students will find the volume of a rectangular prism by counting unit cubes.
Students will find the volume of a rectangular prism by multiplying the edge lengths, or by multiplying the area of the base by the height.
Students will find the volume of a rectangular prism by applying the formula V = B × h.
Students will find the volume of a solid figure composed of two rectangular prisms.
Students will use coincident, collinear, parallel and perpendicular to describe relative orientation on a coordinate grid.
Students will identify parallel, perpendicular, intersecting and skew lines.
Students will measure the degrees in right, acute, obtuse and straight angles using a protractor.
Students will identify different kinds of triangles.
Students will sort polygons by attributes. Students will classify quadrilaterals as parallelograms, trapezoids, rhombi, rectangles and squares.
Students will classify quadrilaterals as parallelograms, trapezoids, rhombi, rectangles and squares.
Students will learn about three-dimensional figures.
Students will sort polyhedrons by their attributes.
Students will identify the arc, chord, radius and diameters of circles. Students will calculate the radius or diameter of a circle.
Students will build 3-dimensional shapes from a set of views.
Students will identify and create a 2-dimensional representation of a 3-dimensional figure (nets) on a grid or dot paper.
Students will find measurement of angles.
Students will learn about ordered pairs.
Students will classify plane figures as having line symmetry, point symmetry, both or none.
Students will apply multiple transformations to a plane figure, predict the result and identify the image of a plane figure as the result of a multiple transformation including 90 degree and 180 degree rotations.
Students will use a scale to show relative size on a map or drawing.
Students will explore similarity using congruent angles. Students will explore congruence using congruent segments and congruent angles.
Students will determine and represent all possible outcomes for a particular probability event using charts, lists or tree diagrams.
Students will calculate the probability of an event.
Students will make predictions for future events based on previous occurrences.
Students will interpret and analyze bar graphs.
Students will interpret line graphs (interpolation and extrapolation).
Students will create and interpret circle graphs using common fractions.
Students will interpret, analyze and create histograms.
Students will interpret and analyze Venn Diagrams.
Students will choose the most appropriate graph for a set of data and make inferences from the graphs.
Students will compare and translate data from information, tallies and data to a graph.
Students will collect, organize and describe data using median, mode and range.
Students will find the mean of a given set of numbers.
Students will use knowledge of stem-and-leaf plots to solve to identify mean, median, mode and range.

5th Grade Language Arts Scope & Sequence

The student will demonstrate knowledge by determining the meaning of synonyms from grade level appropriate vocabulary, by correctly choosing a given word or phrase that means the same thing.
The student will demonstrate knowledge by determining the meaning of antonyms from grade level appropriate vocabulary, by correctly choosing a given word or phrase that means the opposite.
The student will be able to analyze and determine the correct meaning of a word, based on the prefix of the root word or how the prefix is used in the context of a passage.
The student will be able to analyze and determine the correct meaning of a word, based on the suffix of the root word or how the suffix is used in the context of a passage.
The student will be able to identify and select the appropriate homophone or word that sounds the same, based on the context of a passage which fits the best meaning of the given word or phrase.
The student will be able to identify and analyze the author’s use of idioms, based on the context of a passage and how these expressions are used in literal and interpretative information.
The student will be able to identify and determine the meaning of unknown words, based on the understanding of Latin and Greek roots.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying with extensive scaffolding and support, through think aloud prompts.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying with scaffolding and support, through think aloud prompts.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying to independently read and comprehend texts with minimal think aloud support.
Use knowledge, information, and ideas from literary or expository texts to make inferences about the text (e.g., make inferences, draw conclusions, make generalizations, and infer sequence of events.)
Make a summary or paraphrase information from literary or expository text.
Identify the main idea(s) or theme(s), distinguishing them/it from supporting details in a literary text.
Identify plot by using story elements including the main problem and solution.
Identify the main idea(s) using the supporting details in an expository text.
Students will understand two different text structures: chronological order and cause and effect. They will apply these skills by comparing and contrasting two authentic nonfiction articles.
Students will understand two different text structures: chronological order and cause and effect. They will apply these skills by comparing and contrasting two authentic nonfiction articles.
Read, interpret and make predictions using charts, graphs, diagrams, maps or other graphic representations.
Compare and contrast characters, settings, ideas, information and/or plot within a text or between two or more genre sources (literary or expository), including figurative language such as metaphors.
Students will be introduced to academic words to increase language proficiency and activate background knowledge before analyzing two authentic nonfiction articles.
Students will be introduced to academic words to increase language proficiency and activate background knowledge before analyzing two authentic nonfiction articles.
Students will explore the meaning of five different proverbs to increase language proficiency before analyzing two authentic nonfiction articles.
Identify and use knowledge of the author’s purpose to comprehend the writing of a literary or expository text.
Students will understand the basic steps one must take when organizing notes from two sources. Students will independently read two nonfiction articles.
Students will review the basic steps to take when organizing notes from two sources. They will independently read two nonfiction articles.
Students will review the basic steps for taking notes and organizing notes from two sources. They will independently read two nonfiction articles.
Distinguish between fact and opinion in an expository text or within news sources, including the use of hyperbole.
Identify and distinguish between cause and effect in expository and literary texts.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of comprehension skills on grade level appropriate literary and expository passages, with questions that simulate a high-stakes assessment.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the literature. Authentic nonfiction literature is included.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the literature. Authentic nonfiction literature is included.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills. These activities have direct instruction, practice, and scored assessment.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the literature. Authentic fiction literature is included.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections. Student uses prior knowledge and will analyze and evaluate to make sense of texts.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills. These activities have direct instruction, practice, and scored assessment.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the literature. Authentic fiction literature is included.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections. Student uses prior knowledge and will analyze and evaluate to make sense of texts.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills. These activities have direct instruction, practice, and scored assessment.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary.
Through a series of learning activities focused on discovery, recognition, and application, the student will practice language arts skills.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections. Student uses prior knowledge and will analyze and evaluate to make sense of texts.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills. These activities have direct instruction, practice, and scored assessment.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the literature. Authentic fiction literature is included.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections. Student uses prior knowledge and will analyze and evaluate to make sense of texts.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills.

5th Grade Science Scope & Sequence

Properties of Matter focuses on the ability to compare, describe and differentiate different types of matter, using its properties, such as state, texture and mass.
Physical & Chemical Changes focuses on changes of state (i.e.: solid, liquid, gas), chemical reactions, and mixtures and solutions.
Ecosystems focuses on the movement of matter among producers, consumers, decomposers, and the air, water, and soil in the environment.
Water on Earth focuses on the 4 natural spheres (or systems) of Earth – the biosphere, the atmosphere, the geosphere and the hydrosphere – and how they interact within the water cycle.
Interacting with Earth focuses on solutions to reduce the impacts of natural Earth processes on humans, and the fact that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and that their uses affect the environment.
Sun, Earth & Moon focuses on the relationship of the sun, Earth and Moon to shadows, constellations and the patterns we see throughout the year because of those relationships.
Computers in Our Lives focuses on the use and the principles of computers as well as the impact they have and can have on our society.
Robotics focuses on the role of robots and artificial intelligence in our society.

5th Grade Social Studies Scope & Sequence

Locate the Olmec civilization on a world map, and identify it as the first civilization in North and Central America.
Identify the use of rafts and canoes as the main means of travel; identify pile-dwellings and palisades as the main means of construction; and identify the importance of maize cultivation to the Olmec civilization. The learner will describe the major characteristics and contributions of the Olmec civilization (1200 – 400 BC). Locate the Olmec civilization on a world map, and identify it as the first civilization in North and Central America.
Explain the roles of art and religion in the culture of the Olmec civilization.
Describe the Olmecs’ writing system, counting system, and calendar.

Chapter Test: Olmec 1200-400 BC

Locate Phoenicia on a world map, and explain the role of city-states. Identify Sidon and Tyre as the cities that alternately dominated the region. (The learner will describe the major characteristics and contributions of the Phoenicians).
Explain how trade with Egypt influenced the Phoenician culture in terms of clothing and the use of hieroglyphics. (The learner will describe the major characteristics and contributions of the Phoenicians). Locate Phoenicia on a world map, and explain the role of city-states. Identify Sidon and Tyre as the cities that alternately dominated the region. (The learner will describe the major characteristics and conributions of the Phoenicians).
Trace the Phoenician trade routes throughout the Mediterranean and the Near East, and describe the development of Carthage, Byblos, and other major port cities. (The learner will describe the major characteristics and contributions of the Phoenicians). Explain how trade with Egypt influenced the Phoenician culture in terms of clothing and the use of hieroglyphics. (The learner will describe the major characteristics and contributions of the Phoenicians).
Describe the locally manufactured glassware, embroideries, metal articles, and cloth colored with Tyrian purple dye that were traded by the Phonecians. (The learner will describe the major characteristics and contributions of the Phoenicians).
Identify the Phoenicians as the world’s greatest seagoing traders at the time. Explain the possibility that Phoenician sailors traveled around Africa to Britain using the North Star as a means of navigation. (The learner will describe the major characteristics and contributions of the Phoenicians).
Describe the Phoenician invention of the phonetic alphabet, and explain how it is the basis for our modern alphabet. (The learner will describe the major characteristics and contributions of the Phoenicians).

Chapter Test: Phoenicians

Define ”dynasty.” Identify the Shang as ancient China’s first dynasty, and locate the region of the dynasty on a world map.
Identify the Shang dynasty as a period of great innovation. Describe the use of bronze, the creation of silk textiles, and the use of a sophisticated writing system as some of these innovations.
Explain the roles of art and religion in the culture of the Shang dynasty. Describe yin and yang.
Identify the Zhou warriors as the group who took power from the Shang to become the next ruling dynasty in ancient China.
Explain the feudal society established by the Zhou emperors.
Describe the period known as China’s Golden Age.
Identify Confucius as the founder of Confucianism, and explain some of his teachings.
Identify Lao-tzu as the legendary founder of Daoism, and explain some of his teachings.

Chapter Test: Shang/Zhou Dynasty 1027-256BC

Locate the Nubian kingdom on a world map. Identify the different cities that acted as centers of the kingdom throughout its existence, including Kerma, Napata, and Meroë.
Explain the conflicts between Egypt and Nubia and the struggle for power in this region.
Compare the similarities of the culture of Nubia to the culture of Egypt, including the building of pyramids, the use of written language, and the practice of mummification.
Describe the culture of Nubia once it was free from Egyptian influence, including new styles of art and architecture, development of a new language and system of writing, and worshiping of new gods.
Describe the natural resources of Nubia, including timber and iron ore, and the roles these resources played in establishing Meroë as a trade center.

Chapter Test: Nubian Kingdom 1000BC

Locate the ancient Greek civilization on a world map, and explain the role of city-states. Identify Athens, Sparta, Thebes, and Corinth as major city-states of the region.
Define ”tyrants” and their role in running the city-states. Explain how the tyrants were driven out of power, introducing the new system of government called democracy.
Describe the new system of democracy and the rights of the citizens. Explain how this idea would impact future governments throughout the world.
Locate Mount Olympus and describe the roles of the following gods and goddesses: Aphrodite, Hermes, Poseidon, Zeus, Apollo.
Describe the roles of the following gods and goddesses: Ares, Athena, Artemis, Demeter.
Describe the Greek alphabet and understand that it was built upon Phoenician characters. Describe the process of writing on a wax-covered tablet with a stylus.
Describe the contributions of the following Greek scholars: Pythagoras, Hippocrates.
Describe the contributions of the following Greek scholars: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle.
Explain the roles of art, architecture, and music in developing the culture of the ancient Greek civilization.
Explain the roles of art, architecture, and music in developing the culture of the ancient Greek civilization.
Explain the roles of athletics, drama, and literature in developing the culture of the ancient Greek civilization.

Chapter Test: What’s Cooking?

Describe the life of Thomas Jefferson in terms of his presidency and his hobbies.
Describe the importance of the Louisiana Purchase and the roles of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, and Napoleon Bonaparte.
Describe the exploration of the new territory of Louisiana and the roles of Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, and Sacajawea.
Describe the expedition of Zebulon Pike.
Describe the presidency of James Madison and the role of Dolley Madison.
Identify the events leading to the War of 1812 and the roles of William Henry Harrison and Tecumseh. Describe the importance of British impressment of American sailors and the Battle of Tippecanoe.
Describe the War of 1812 and the battles of Lake Erie and New Orleans. Know about the British burning of the White House and Capitol, and the circumstances surrounding the writing of The Star-Spangled Banner.
Lesson DeDescribe the presidency of James Monroe, the Era of Good Feelings, and the Monroe Doctrine.Orleans.
Explain the Missouri Compromise and how the expansion of slavery into the newly acquired United States territory threatened national unity.
Describe the presidency of Andrew Jackson and the importance of the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, and the Seminole Wars.

Chapter Test: U.S. Politics 1801-1840

Describe the meaning of ”Manifest Destiny” and the role of John O’Sullivan.
Describe the role of ”mountain men” and fur traders in the expansion of the West and their relations with the Native Americans. Identify Kit Carson.
Describe the means of travel available to pioneers heading west, including the steamboat, wagon trains, and flatboats.
Trace the land route west opened by William Becknell that became known as the Santa Fe Trail.
Describe the people and events leading to the Texas War for Independence, including the early settlement of Texas and the roles of Stephen Austin and Mexican General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna.
Describe the people and events of the Battle of the Alamo, including Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie, and Susanna Dickerson.
Describe the outcome of the Texas War for Independence and the roles of Sam Houston and Santa Anna. Identify the Lone Star Republic and explain the request for annexation.
Trace the route of the Oregon Trail and describe life on the trail.
Explain the Missouri Compromise and how the expansion of slavery into the newly acquired United States territory threatened national unity.
Identify the reasons that the Mormons (Latter-day Saints) traveled west to Utah and the roles of Joseph Smith and Brigham Young.
Describe the events leading to the Mexican-American War.
Describe the outcome of the Mexican-American War and the roles of General Zachary Taylor and Santa Anna. Identify the Mexican lands ceded to America, and explain the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.
Describe how the discovery of gold changed California.

Chapter Test: U.S. History 1820-1850

Describe Charles Goodyear’s invention of rubber and how it helped lead to economic growth in the Northeast.
Describe Elias Howe’s invention of the sewing machine and how it helped lead to economic growth in the Northeast.
Describe Samuel Morse’s invention of the telegraph and how it helped lead to economic growth in the Northeast.
Identify the role of whaling, trade, and clipper ships in the economic growth of the Northeast.
Identify the role of industry and factories in the economy of the Northeast.
Identify agriculture and Cyrus McCormick’s invention of the reaper as major contributors to the Midwest economy.
Describe the importance of railroads as a link from the Midwest to the North.
Trace the route of the Oregon Trail and describe life on the trail.
Identify cotton-growing as the major economic activity of the South and the importance of exportation, plantations, and slave labor.
Describe living conditions of enslaved African Americans, the importance of Nat Turner’s Revolt, and slave codes.
Identify the problems faced by free African Americans.
Describe how the movement to end slavery gained strength in the mid-1800’s. Define abolition and describe the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Identify Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth as abolitionists and African American leaders.
Describe the role of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad in the anti-slavery movement.
Describe the struggle for women’s rights in the mid-1800s and the importance of the Seneca Falls Convention.
Describe Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s, Lucretia Mott’s, and Amelia Bloomer’s contributions to women’s rights.
Describe Elizabeth Blackwell’s and Susan B. Anthony’s contributions to women’s rights.
Describe the temperance movement and the role of reformers in the mid-1800s.
Describe the contributions of Horace Mann and Dorothea Dix.

Chapter Test: U.S. Economy in the mid-1800s

Summarize the Compromise of 1850 and the roles of Henry Clay, John Calhoun, William Seward, Daniel Webster, President Taylor, and President Fillmore. Define popular sovereignty and the Fugitive Slave Law.
Describe how Harriet Beecher Stowe and ”Uncle Tom’s Cabin” affected the slavery debate.
Describe how the Dred Scott decision kept the issue of slavery alive, the importance of the newly formed Republican party, and the Lincoln-Douglas debates for the Illinois senate seat.
Describe the raid at Harpers Ferry and the roles of John Brown and Robert E. Lee. Summarize the presidential election of 1860 and the roles of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglass, John Breckinridge, and John Bell.
Explain the events that led to the outbreak of the Civil War, including the southern states’ secession from the Union, the formation of the Confederate States of America, and the attack at Fort Sumter. Describe the roles of Jefferson Davis, President Lincoln, and Major Robert Anderson.

Chapter Test: Leading to the American Civil War

Identify the states and territories that made up the Union and the Confederacy. Identify the terms: Yankees, Rebels, the Blue and the Gray.
Explain the advantages and disadvantages each side had as the Civil War began.
Describe the first Battle of Bull Run, and identify Stonewall Jackson.
Describe the battle at sea including the roles of ”ironclad” warships, the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia.
Describe the fight for control of the Mississippi River and the Battle of Shiloh, including the roles of Ulysses S. Grant and Captain David Farragut.
Describe the Union’s campaign to seize Richmond and the Second Battle of Bull Run, including the roles of George McClellan and Robert E. Lee.
Describe the Battle of Antietam.
Describe the effect of the Emancipation Proclamation.
Explain the role of African Americans in the Civil War.
Explain the role of women in the Civil War.
Explain why the battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg were turning points in the Civil War.
Describe the Gettysburg Address and its impact on American history.
Describe General William Sherman’s march to the sea and the burning of Atlanta.
Describe the events that led to Lee’s surrender at Appomattox.
Describe the costs of the Civil War.

Chapter Test: The American Civil War

Describe the death of President Abraham Lincoln and the presidency of Andrew Johnson.
Describe President Johnson’s plan for Reconstruction and the importance of the Freedmen’s Bureau, Radical Republicans, and the attempted impeachment of Johnson.
Describe the new groups of voters in the South and how Congress protected them. Define the terms: freedmen, scalawags, carpetbaggers.
Explain the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution.
Identify white supremacy groups, such as the Ku Klux Klan, and the enactment of the Black Codes.
Describe the end of the Reconstruction period and the Compromise of 1877.

Chapter Test: Reconstruction 1865-1877

Locate on a United States map the 50 states and their capitals.
Locate on a map the major cities of the United States.
Identify the regions of New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the South, and describe their characteristics.
Identify the regions of the Midwest and the Great Plains, and describe their characteristics.
Identify the regions of the West, the Southwest, and the Pacific Northwest, and describe their characteristics.
Locate on a United States map the following major rivers: James, Hudson, St. Lawrence.
Locate on a United States map the following major rivers: Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio.
Locate on a United States map the following major rivers: Columbia, Rio Grande.
Identify the Continental Divide and describe the flow of rivers: east of the Rockies, to the Arctic or Atlantic Oceans, west of the Rockies, to the Pacific Ocean.
Identify the time zones of the United States.

Chapter Test: Geography of the United States

Know that there are different time zones throughout the world.
Locate on a world map the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn. Describe the relationship of these lines to seasons and temperatures.
Describe the following climate zones of the world: arctic, tropic, temperate.
Identify the following regions of the world and describe their characteristics: polar regions, mountains.
Identify the following regions of the world and describe their characteristics: islands, rain forests.
Identify the following regions of the world and describe their characteristics: forests, deserts, grasslands.
Describe the tools and methods used by archaeologists.
Identify the kinds of information that archaeologists can acquire from artifacts and ruins.
Explain how historians use archaeological information to draw conclusions about past cultures.

Chapter Test: World Geography

Describe the purpose of governments and how their powers are acquired, used, and justified.
Identify the terms of office for the president, senators, representatives, and justices.
Describe how democratic laws are developed and why they are fundamental to society.
Give examples of civil rights.
Explain ways that individuals and groups influence and shape public policy.
Explain ways that individuals and groups influence and shape public policy.
Recognize how America has resolved civil and international conflict.
Explain the leadership role of the United States in international settings.
Know that a citizen is a legally recognized member of the United States who has certain rights and privileges as well as responsibilities. Describe the effects of prejudice and discrimination.

Chapter Test: Political Science

Describe the law of supply and demand.
Describe how economic systems produce and distribute goods and services.
Identify factors that affect how consumers make their choices.
Describe the relationship between price and quantity supplied of a good or service.
Identify and explain examples of competition in the economy.
Explain the economic role of government in relation to health, safety, and environmental concerns.
Explain the economic role of government to provide for national defense, to defend and protect property rights, to attempt to make markets more competitive.
Describe the relationships among specialization and division of labor on productivity of workers, and the interdependence between producers and consumers.
Explain why people and countries voluntarily exchange goods and services.
Explain the concept of entrepreneurship.
Describe how income often reflects choices made about education and career. Describe unemployment.

Chapter Test: Economic System

Identify the accomplishments of the Wilber and Orville Wright who invented the airplane.
The student will be able to describe Samuel F. Morse’s invention of the telegraph.
Identify the accomplishments of Louis Braille who invented the Braille system.
Identify the many accomplishments of Elijah Mc Coy who invented the automatic oil pump, the sprinkler system and the ironing board.
Explain the leadership role of the United States in international settings.
Know that a citizen is a legally recognized member of the United States who has certain rights and privileges as well as responsibilities. Describe the effects of prejudice and discrimination.

Chapter Test: 19th Century Individuals

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$24.95
  • Monthly, first student
  • ($14.95 monthly for each additional student)

9th - 12th

$34.95
  • Monthly, per student
  • (Includes 4 courses per student)

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