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3rd Grade Scope and Sequence

3rd Grade Scope and Sequence
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In order to homeschool third grade successfully and allow your child to reach all their objectives, it’s important to know what to teach and when. Since many concepts build on each other, teaching them in the right sequence will help students gain a thorough understanding before they move on to more advanced concepts.

Time4Learning provides the 3rd grade scope and sequence for math, language arts, science and social studies, and this page will give you an overview of what you can expect your child to learn with our award-winning curriculum.

3rd Grade Math Scope & Sequence

Convert numbers containing two to six digits from standard form to expanded form and vice versa.
Write numbers up to six digits using oral and written cues.
Order numbers up to six digits and compare numbers using the symbols <, >, and =.
Round numbers up to the ten-thousands to the nearest ten. Use number lines and knowledge of place value.
Round numbers up to the ten-thousands to the nearest hundred. Use number lines and knowledge of place value.
Round numbers to the nearest ten, to the nearest hundred, and to the nearest thousand.
Add three or more single digit addends. (grouping property) Add 2- and 3-digit numbers. (with and without regrouping)
Subtract 2-and 3-digit numbers. (with regrouping) Subtract 2- and 3-digit numbers when minuend has multiple zeros. (with regrouping)
Estimate sums and differences using rounding.
An introduction to multiplication (0-12 x 0-12) including multiplication by 0 and 1, using arrays and tables.
Define and list multiples of a given number (1-10). Explore multiplication as repeated addition and arrays.
Multiply two whole numbers with and without regrouping in which one factor is a one-digit number and the other is a 2-digit number. Multiply mentally by 10, 100, and 1000.
Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10 – 90 using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.
An introduction to simple division problems including divisions involving 0 and 1 and divisions involving remainders using tables and other manipulatives.
Recognize and use basic division facts to 100 ÷ 10, and identify dividend, divisor, and quotient. Describe these division properties: you cannot divide by 0, and any number divided by 1 equals that number.
Represent and solve problems involving division. Interpret quotients of whole number as the either the number of objects in each share when objects are partitioned equally, or as the number of shares.
Represent and solve problems involving division. Use division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
Divide two-digit dividends by one-digit divisors, with and without remainders.
Identify arithmetic patterns using an addition table.
Identify arithmetic patterns using a multiplication table, and explain them using properties of operations.
Solve a multi-step word problem using multiplication and division.
Understand division as an unknown-factor problem.
Understand multiplication and use strategies to fluently multiply within 100.
Understand division and use strategies to fluently divide within 100.
Recognize fractions as part of a whole and understand the meaning of the numerator and the denominator.
Identify the fraction shown by a point on a number line and learn how to place a fraction on a number line.
Understand two fractions as equivalent if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.
Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator using fraction models.
Identify parts of a set and parts of a whole with equivalent fractions with denominators up to 10.
Identify equivalent fractions. (1/2 = 2/4)
Order fractions with like denominators and compare fractions using the symbols <, >, and =.
Explore the relationship between fractions and decimals. (tenths and hundredths)
Identify decimals to the hundredths place. Read and write decimals to the hundredths.
Order decimals to the hundredths place, and compare decimals using the symbols <, >, and =.
Count collection of coins and bills up to $50. Add and subtract dollar amounts. (dollar and cents)
Solve word problems that involve the value of coins, bills, and making change.
Solve problems involving unit price of items.
Identify and extend repeating patterns and apply pattern rules using shapes, colors and numbers.
Identify and extend patterns and apply pattern rules using a sequence of related numbers.
Apply the appropriate rule to complete a chart including input/output tables.
Represent and evaluate written relationships as numeric expressions.
Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication equation relating three whole numbers.
Determine the unknown whole number in a division equation relating three whole numbers.
Solve for an unknown quantity in an equation. Example: 3 + __ = 7.(Example: missing addend or missing factor)
Understand properties of multiplication and apply these properties as strategies to multiply.
Understand properties of division and apply these properties as strategies to divide.
Use the Order (Commutative) and Grouping (Associative) Properties of Addition and Multiplication to find equivalent expressions or equations containing an unknown quantity.
Describe line segments, lines, and line pairs.
Identify and classify angles as right, acute, or obtuse.
Identify the attributes of polygons (sides and angles) and sort by particular characteristics of the plane figure.
Identify the attributes of solid figures (edges, vertices, and faces) such as cubes, rectangular prisms, rectangular pyramids, cones, cylinders, and spheres and sort by particular characteristics.
Identify and create a two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional figure.
Find the horizontal or vertical distance between two points on a coordinate grid.
Plot a point on a coordinate grid given an ordered pair and write the ordered pair of a point shown on a coordinate grid.
After being given navigational directions from the initial point, identify the ordered pair of the final point.
Given a plane figure, identify the congruent shape and create a congruent shape using other plane figures.
Apply a slide, flip, or turn to a plane figure and predict the result. Identify the image of a plane figure as a slide, flip, or turn.
Use line and point symmetry to identify and create symmetrical figures.
Define, tell, and show time to the hour, half hour, and quarter hour. Define, tell, and show time to the 5 and 1 minute intervals.
Find elapsed time using minutes, hours, days, and weeks. Develop measuring skills and demonstrate understanding of concepts related measuring time.
Solve problems of elapsed time using a number line.
Interpret time schedules using minutes, hours, days, and weeks.
Define units of length. (inch, foot, yard, mile) Estimate and compare length. Measure to the nearest half-inch.
Define units of capacity. (cup, pint, quart, gallon) Estimate and compare capacity.
Define units of weight. (ounce, pound) Estimate and compare weight.
Read thermometer to nearest 5-degree interval.
Define units of length. (centimeter, decimeter, meter) Estimate and compare length. Measure to the nearest centimeter.
Define units of capacity. (milliliters, liters) Estimate and compare capacity.
Define units of mass. (grams, kilograms) Estimate and compare mass.
Read thermometer to nearest 5-degree interval.
Estimate volumes of objects in liters and milliliters by comparing to benchmark objects.
Solve real-world problems involving mass in kilograms and grams, and volume in liters.
Measure the area of a rectangle using unit squares.
Find the area of a figure by counting unit squares.
Find the area of a rectangle by tiling and by multiplying the side lengths.
Interpret y = mx + b as a linear function.
Find the area of a rectangle by multiplying the length and width.
Find the area of a rectangle by dividing it into two smaller rectangles.
Find area by decomposing composite shapes into rectangles and adding the areas.
Find perimeter by counting units and by adding lengths. Measure to find the perimeter. Select appropriate label for measurement.
Find area by counting units. Multiply to find area. Select appropriate labels of measurement.
Compare perimeter and area.
Display and interpret data in pictographs.
Display and interpret data in vertical and horizontal bar graphs.
Display and interpret data in tables including tally, data, and frequency tables.
Display and interpret data in frequency tables using two attributes.
Determine the certainty, likelihood, and fairness of events.
Determine and list all the possible outcomes of an event.
Use Polya’s four-step method to solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown.
Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.

3rd Grade Language Arts Scope & Sequence

The student will demonstrate knowledge by determining the meaning of synonyms from grade level appropriate vocabulary, by correctly choosing a given word or phrase that means the same thing, in reading.
The student will demonstrate knowledge by determining the meaning of antonyms from grade level appropriate vocabulary, by correctly choosing a given word or phrase that means the opposite, in reading.
The student will be able to analyze and determine the correct meaning of a word, based on the prefix of the root word or how the prefix is used in the context of a passage.
The student will be able to analyze and determine the correct meaning of a word, based on the suffix of the root word or how the suffix is used in the context of a passage.
The student will be able to identify and select the appropriate homophone or word that sounds the same, based on the context of a passage which fits the best meaning of the given word or phrase.
The student will be able to identify and analyze the author’s use of idioms, based on the context of a passage and how these expressions are used in literal and interpretative information.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying with extensive scaffolding and support, through think aloud prompts.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying with scaffolding and support, through think aloud prompts.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying to independently read and comprehend texts with minimal think aloud support.
Use knowledge, information, and ideas from literary or expository texts to make inferences about the text (e.g., make inferences, draw conclusions, make generalizations, and infer sequence of events.
Identify the main idea(s) or theme(s), distinguishing them/it from supporting details in a literary text.
Develop summaries or paraphrase information from literary or expository text containing context clues.
Identify characters and compare and contrast characters within a literary text.
Identify and describe the setting(s) in a literary text
Identify plot by using story elements including the main problem and solution.
Identify the main idea(s) using the supporting details in an expository text.
Students will be introduced to variations in language, specifically how common phrases like “spilled the beans” can have nonliteral meanings.
Students will understand some variations in language, specifically how common phrases like “penny pincher” can have nonliteral meanings, and that digital texts have specific features, like hyperlinks.
Students will be introduced to the concepts of shades of meaning, point of view, and context clues. They will apply these skills when reading two authentic nonfiction texts, “Homesick” and “Wall of Wonder”.
Students will review shades of meaning, point of view, and context clues. They will apply these skills when reading an authentic nonfiction text, “Cats versus Dogs: Who makes a better friend?”
Students will review shades of meaning, point of view, and context clues. They will apply these skills when reading an authentic nonfiction text, “Food Fight.”
Identify and use knowledge of the author’s purpose to comprehend the writing of a literary or expository text.
Read and interpret charts and graphs.
Compare and contrast characters, settings, ideas, information and/or plot within a text or between two or more genre sources (literary or expository) that include figurative language such as similes.
Students will be introduced to scientific vocabulary and high utility academic words. Main idea and details will be reviewed before students compare and contrast these elements in two nonfiction texts.
Students will be introduced to scientific vocabulary and high utility academic words. Main idea and details will be reviewed before students compare and contrast these elements in two nonfiction texts.
Students will be introduced to scientific concepts, high utility academic words, and root words. Students will compare and contrast the main ideas and details in two nonfiction texts about ice.
Identify literary or expository text that is organized in sequential/chronological order using words (first, next, last, then, finally, etc.) or phrases (to begin with, in addition to, etc.).
Distinguish between fact and opinion in an expository text.
Identify and distinguish between cause and effect in expository and literary texts.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of comprehension skills on grade level appropriate literary and expository passages, with questions that simulate a high-stakes assessment.
The student will learn thematic content through discovery, and achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary. Authentic fiction literature is included.
Through a series of learning activities focused on discovery, recognition, and application, the student will practice language arts skills.
The student will learn thematic content through discovery, and achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary.
Through a series of learning activities focused on discovery, recognition, and application, the student will practice language arts skills.
The student will learn thematic content through discovery, and achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary.
Through a series of learning activities focused on discovery, recognition, and application, the student will practice language arts skills.
The student will learn thematic content through discovery, and achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary.
Through a series of learning activities focused on discovery, recognition, and application, the student will practice language arts skills.
The student will learn thematic content through discovery, and achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary.
Through a series of learning activities focused on discovery, recognition, and application, the student will practice language arts skills.
The student will learn thematic content through discovery and achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary. Authentic Caldecott-winning fictional literature is included.
Through a series of learning activities focused on discovery, recognition, and application, the student will practice language arts skills.
The student will learn thematic content through discovery and achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary. Authentic fiction literature is included.
Through a series of learning activities focused on discovery, recognition, and application, the student will practice language arts skills.

3rd Grade Science Scope & Sequence

Changes in Motion focuses on motion and the forces (like gravity and friction) that can change it as well as patterns of motion that can be predicted.
Electricity & Magnetism focuses on the invisible forces of static electricity and magnetism as well as conductors and insulators and current electricity.
Life Cycles focuses on the fact that all living things (plants and animals) have a unique life cycle but that they all include the stages of birth, growth and development, reproduction, and death.
Inheritance & Environment focuses on traits of living things and how they can be inherited or acquired, or influenced by the environment.
Adaptations & Variations focuses on changes in behavior and physical characteristics that can happen in a species, based on their needs and their environment.
Weather & Climate focuses students’ attention on designing solutions for weather related hazards as well as weather patterns and the affects of weather on our every day lives.
Our Solar System focuses on the sun, our eight planets and other smaller bodies orbiting within our solar system.

3rd Grade Social Studies Scope & Sequence

Students are introduced to geography.
Students will explain how a globe can help us understand our world.
Students will use a globe to identify the oceans and other bodies of water on Earth.
Students will use a globe to identify the continents and other land features of Earth.
Students will use a globe to recognize characteristics of major climate regions.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding of the material.
Students are introduced to the understanding that maps are tools used to explore Earth.
Students will compare information found on globes and maps.
Students will use map features to read and understand maps.
Students will understand how GPS and satellites are used to plan routes.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding of the material.
Students are introduced to considerations people make when deciding where to live.
Students will identify some natural resources and connect how they relate to needs.
Students will describe how the environment, people, and activities in an area can affect decisions about where to settle.
Students will identify five US regions and describe how environmental and human characteristics make states in the same region similar.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding of the material.
Students are introduced to history.
Students explore what North America was like before Europeans arrived.
Students examine primary sources to learn about what happened in the past.
Students use primary sources to learn about the Pilgrims and their journey to and colonization of Plymouth.
Students explore the origins of and what life was like in the Middle Colonies.
Students explore the origins of and what life was like in the Southern Colonies.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding about what was taught in the chapter.
Students are introduced to the understanding that there was a series of events that led to the building of a new nation.
Students will explain the colonists’ reactions to taxes imposed by the British government.
Students will explain how the Boston Tea Party was a protest against the British government.
Students will describe how the British responded to the Boston Tea Party.
Students will describe why it was difficult for the British to surprise the American colonists.
Students will examine how decisions about war led to the building of a new nation.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding of the material.
Students are introduced to forms of government.
Students will explore the purpose and work of government and three different forms of government: monarchy, autocracy, and democracy.
Students will investigate the choices made to build a government for the United States, identify the three branches of the federal government, and learn about checks and balances in government.
Students locate democratic countries in the world and compare election day traditions.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding of the material.
Students are introduced to rules and laws.
Students explore the steps needed for a bill to become a federal law.
Students learn how state governments are organized and how they make laws.
Students learn how local governments are organized and how they make laws.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding of the material.
Students are introduced to rights and responsibilities.
Students will identify some rights that all people deserve, and their responsibilities to others.
Students will describe how the US Constitution can be changed.
Students recount instances when people were denied their rights.
Students will describe how women in the United States got the right to vote.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding of the material.
Students are introduced to economics.
Students will explore how consumers meet their wants and needs.
Students will explore how producers offer goods and services.
Students will explore how scarcity and surplus affect economic decisions.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding of the material.
Students will examine ways that prices affect markets.
Students will answer questions to check their understanding about the topic and lesson vocabulary.
Students will consider ways technology affects business.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter.
Students are introduced to the understanding that money can be spent or saved.
Students will discover how systems of money were developed and learn about some of the money used around the world.
Students will discover ways to save money and learn how investing works.
Students will review Vearl’s summary of information taught in the chapter and then will answer questions to check their understanding of the material.

Additional 3rd Grade Homeschool Resources

PreK - 8th

$24.95
  • Monthly, first student
  • ($14.95/mo for each additional PreK-8th student)

9th - 12th

$34.95
  • Monthly, per student
  • ($14.95/mo for each additional PreK-8th student)

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