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8th Grade Scope and Sequence

8th Grade Scope and Sequence
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In an 8th grade scope and sequence you’ll see the list of topics and activities that are going to be taught throughout the course for a specific subject.

Time4Learning provides parents with the 8th grade scope and sequence for all the subjects you select. This will help you with the order in which things will be taught and may also include lesson objectives.

8th Grade Math Scope & Sequence

Express numbers between zero and one in scientific notation.
Identify rational and irrational numbers and describe meanings.
Identify and explain absolute value.
Convert repeating decimals to fractions.
Calculate and approximate principal square roots.
Use roots to solve equations.
Compare and order numbers in many forms including: fractions, decimals, scientific notation, absolute value, and radicals.
Use estimation for situations using real numbers.
Apply properties to solve problems with real numbers.
Simplify numerical expressions with real numbers.
Use divisibility rules to solve problems.
Represent numbers in base ten in other bases (two, five, and eight) and vice versa.
Identify numbers as relatively prime.
Describe and use rate of change to solve problems.
Use proportional relationships to find measures of length, weight or mass, and capacity or volume.
Solve real world problems involving percents greater than 100.
Compare two proportional relationships.
Solve real world problems with rational numbers (including integers, decimals and fractions).
Solve real world problems with ratios, rates, proportions, and percents.
Solve real world two- or three- step problems with integers, decimals, fractions, ratios, rates, proportions, and percents.
Substitute rational numbers into expressions and evaluate.
Substitute rational numbers into expressions with exponents and radicals.
Translate word expressions and equations into algebraic expressions and equations (including one or more variables and exponents).
Translate verbal expressions and sentences into algebraic inequalities and vice versa.
Use variables to represent unknown quantities in real world situations.
Combine and simplify algebraic expressions with a maximum of two variables.
Evaluate algebraic expressions and equations by substituting integral values for variables and simplifying.
Solve linear inequalities in one variable algebraically.
Identify the number of solutions in a linear equation.
Solve equations with variables on both sides.
Solve equations requiring the distributive property.
Solve equations requiring combining like terms.
Use properties of parallelism, perpendicularity, and symmetry to solve real world problems.
Compare and describe properties of convex and concave polygons.
Apply the Pythagorean theorem to solve real world problems.
Identify congruence and similarity in real world situations and justify.
Identify and perform transformations (reflection, translation, rotation, and dilation) of a figure on a coordinate plane.
Identify how changes in dimensions affect area and perimeter.
Transform lines and line segments.
Transform angles.
Transform parallel lines.
Understand congruence.
Use a sequence of transformations.
Understand similar figures.
Describe sequences of transformations that show similarity.
Prove triangle theorems informally.
Understand angles formed when parallel lines are cut by a transversal.
Explore angle-angle similarity.
Use the converse of the Pythagorean theorem.
Apply the Pythagorean theorem in three dimensions.
Apply the Pythagorean theorem in the coordinate plane.
Find the volume of pyramids, prisms, and cones.
Apply volume formulas.
Find the surface area of pyramids, prisms, and cones.
Compare regular and irregular polygons.
Find the angle measure in two-dimensional figures and two-dimensional sides of three-dimensional figures based on geometric relationships.
Identify the relationship between volume or surface area and dimension.
Interpret and apply various scales including number lines, graphs, models, and maps.
Select tools to measure quantities and dimensions to a specified degree of accuracy and determine the greatest possible error of measurement.
Identify the number of significant digits as related to the least precise unit of measure and apply to real world contexts.
Use a table to find ordered pair solutions of a linear equation in slope-intercept form.
Graph linear equations in standard form.
Identify and graph inequalities on a number line.
Identify and graph inequalities in the coordinate plane.
Solve problems in two variables using linear inequalities.
Given the graph of a linear relationship, determine the x- and y- intercepts.
Given the graph of a line, determine the slope.
Given the slope and y-intercept, write an equation.
Find a function rule to describe a linear relationship using tables of related input-output variables.
Using information from a table, graph, or rule, determine if a function is linear and justify.
Graph proportional relationships and interpreting slope.
Use similar triangles to understand slope.
Use slope-intercept form.
Interpret y = mx + b as a linear function.
Recognize functions.
Compare functions represented in different forms.
Interpret y = mx + b as a linear function.
Construct linear functions.
Describe a functional relationship by analyzing a graph.
Sketch graphs of functions.
Calculate conditional probabilities and the probabilities of dependent events.
Define and differentiate between different types of sampling techniques.
Use different types of sampling techniques to collect data.
Identify whether a sample is biased.
Interpret circle, line, bar, histogram, stem-and-leaf, and box-and-whisker graphs including how different displays lead to different interpretations.
Identify and explain how statistics and graphs can be used in misleading ways.
Determine appropriate measures of central tendency for a given situation or set of data.
Use technology to determine the mean, median, mode, and range of a set of real world data.

8th Grade Language Arts Scope & Sequence

The student will demonstrate knowledge by determining the meaning of synonyms from grade level appropriate vocabulary, by correctly choosing a given word or phrase that means the same thing, in reading activities that incorporate explicit instruction and application.
The student will demonstrate knowledge by determining the meaning of antonyms from grade level appropriate vocabulary, by correctly choosing a given word or phrase that means the opposite, in reading activities that incorporate explicit instruction and application.
The student will be able to analyze and determine the correct meaning of a word, based on the prefix of the root word or how the prefix is used in the context of a passage.
The student will be able to analyze and determine the correct meaning of a word, based on the suffix of the root word or how the suffix is used in the context of a passage.
The student will be able to identify and select the appropriate homophone or word that sounds the same, based on the context of a passage which fits the best meaning of the given word or phrase.
The student will be able to identify and analyze the author’s use of idioms, based on the context of a passage and how these expressions are used in literal and interpretative information.
The student will be able to identify and determine the meaning of unknown words, based on the understanding of Latin and Greek roots.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying with extensive scaffolding and support, through think aloud prompts.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying with scaffolding and support, through think aloud prompts.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying to independently read and comprehend texts with minimal think aloud support.
Make a summary, paraphrase, or synthesize information from two or more literary or expository texts.
Analyze and explain the impact of characters and settings within the plot of literary text(s), and how these relationships affect the central conflict leading to the climax and resolution.
Identify the ways major and minor conflicts affect character’s actions by comparing and contrasting actions, setting(s), symbolism, and plot from various literary texts.
Identify, summarize, or explain the main idea(s) using the supporting details in an expository text.
Identify, summarize, or explain the main idea(s) or theme(s) using the supporting details and symbolism in a literary text.
Read, interpret and make predictions using charts, graphs, diagrams, maps or other graphic representations.
Identify cause and effect relationships that involve characters and events, and distinguishing cause from effect in literary and expository texts.
Identify and use knowledge of the author’s purpose by analyzing how the literary techniques of mood and tone affects author’s perspective and contributes to the comprehension of a literary or expository text.
Use knowledge, information, and ideas from literary texts, expository texts, or from multiple sources to make inferences about the text(s) (e.g., make inferences, draw conclusions, make generalizations, infer sequence of events, and infer a character’s feelings.)
Compare and contrast information and ideas within a text or between two or more texts (literary or expository), including metaphors and point of view.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of comprehension skills on grade level appropriate literary and expository passages, with questions that simulate a high-stakes assessment.
Through an exploratory activity, the student will acquire background information that will set the stage for the anchor piece, an excerpt from the realistic fiction novel Surviving the Applewhites. The student will develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary and an interactive assessment activity that focuses on correctly identifying a vocabulary word with its definition. The student will also respond to a prewriting prompt.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading an excerpt from the realistic fiction novel Surviving the Applewhites with emphasis on vocabulary and fluency. The student will be assessed on their comprehension of the literature selection by answering questions about making inferences, drawing conclusions, sequence, characterization, recalling details, cause and effect, point of view, compare/contrast, summarizing, and the impact of setting on character.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections and be assessed on vocabulary contained in the literature selection. The student will analyze and evaluate the literature piece by responding to literary response and analysis prompts. Through a comprehension activity that incorporates direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on how dialogue is used to develop characters and mood in the selection. A reteach component provides a different instructional modality for students who need additional direct instruction on the characterization and mood objective.
Through a series of writing activities that incorporate direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on writing a persuasive composition that states a clear position in support of a proposal as it relates to a college application essay. The student will respond to prompts to write a college application essay of his or her own.
Through an exploratory activity, the student will acquire background information that will set the stage for the anchor piece, the short story Ruthie’s Journal. The student will develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary and an interactive assessment activity that focuses on correctly identifying a vocabulary word with its definition. The student will also respond to a prewriting prompt.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading the short story Ruthie’s Journal with emphasis on vocabulary and fluency. The student will be assessed on their comprehension of the literature selection by answering questions about author’s purpose, mood, summarizing, recognizing main idea, recalling details, supporting details, theme, characterization, point of view, and cause and effect.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections and be assessed on vocabulary contained in the literature selection. The student will analyze and evaluate the literature piece by responding to literary response and analysis prompts. Through a comprehension activity that incorporates direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on identifying text that uses sequencing or other types of logical order in the selection. A reteach component provides a different instructional modality for students who need additional direct instruction on the sequence of events objective.
Through a series of writing activities that incorporate direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on writing an informational report that develops a topic with simple facts, details, examples and explanations as it relates to a travel article. The student will respond to a prompt to write a travel article of his or her own.
Through an exploratory activity, the student will acquire background information that will set the stage for the anchor piece, an excerpt from Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World. The student will develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary and an interactive assessment activity that focuses on correctly identifying a vocabulary word with its definition. The student will also respond to a prewriting prompt.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading an excerpt from the true story Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World: The Extraordinary True Story of Shackleton and the Endurance with emphasis on vocabulary and fluency. The student will be assessed on their comprehension of the literature selection by answering questions about making inferences, personification, sequence, impact of plot on characters, cause and effect, theme, mood, supporting details, drawing conclusions, and utilizing analogy.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections and be assessed on vocabulary contained in the literature selection. The student will analyze and evaluate the literature piece by responding to literary response and analysis prompts. Through a comprehension activity that incorporates direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on identifying and summarizing main and supporting ideas in the selection. A reteach component provides a different instructional modality for students who need additional direct instruction on the summarization objective.
Through a series of writing activities that incorporate direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on writing a cover letter and will respond to a prompt where they will write his or her own.
Through an exploratory activity, the student will acquire background information that will set the stage for the anchor piece, a series of poems from the book 19 Varieties of Gazelle: Poems of the Middle East. The student will develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary and an interactive assessment activity that focuses on correctly identifying a vocabulary word with its definition. The student will also respond to a prewriting prompt.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading poems from 19 Varieties of Gazelle: Poems of the Middle East with emphasis on vocabulary and fluency. The student will be assessed on their comprehension of the literature selection by answering questions about main idea, cause and effect, symbolism, making inferences, mood, tone, point of view, and literary technique.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections and be assessed on vocabulary contained in the literature selection. The student will analyze and evaluate the literature piece by responding to literary response and analysis prompts. Through a comprehension activity that incorporates direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on identifying and analyzing themes in the selection. A reteach component provides a different instructional modality for students who need additional direct instruction on theme.
Through a series of writing activities that incorporate direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on free verse poetry. The student will respond to prompts to write a free verse poem of his or her own.
Through an exploratory activity, the student will acquire background information that will set the stage for the anchor piece, an excerpt from the historical fiction novel True North. The student will develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary and an interactive assessment activity that focuses on correctly identifying a vocabulary word with its definition. The student will also respond to a prewriting prompt.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading an excerpt from the historical fiction novel True North: A Novel of the Underground Railroad with emphasis on vocabulary and fluency. The student will be assessed on their comprehension of the literature selection by answering questions about the impact of setting, drawing conclusions, characterization, making inferences, cause and effect, supporting details, author’s purpose, recognizing main idea, point of view, and impact of setting on character.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections and be assessed on vocabulary contained in the literature selection. The student will analyze and evaluate the literature piece by responding to literary response and analysis prompts. Through a comprehension activity that incorporates direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on identifying and analyzing text that uses compare and contrast in the selection. A reteach component provides a different instructional modality for students who need additional direct instruction on the compare and contrast objective.
Through a series of writing activities that incorporate direct instruction, a practice, and an assessment component, the student will focus on writing a biographical or autobiographical narrative or short story that relates a clear, coherent incident, event or situation by using well-chosen details. The student will respond to a prompt to write a biography of his or her own.

8th Grade Science Scope and & Sequence

  • Introduction to Matter
  • Physical Properties
  • Density
  • Lab: Density of Solids
  • States of Matter
  • Changes of State
  • Chemical Properties
  • Atomic Theory
  • Atoms
  • Elements
  • Periodic Table
  • Metals
  • Nonmetals
  • Metalloids
  • Compounds
  • Chemical Bonding
  • Ionic Bonds
  • Covalent Bonds
  • Polymers
  • Introduction to Chemical Reactions
  • Describing Chemical Reactions
  • Balancing Chemical Reactions
  • Types of Chemical Reactions
  • Lab: Rate of Chemical Reactions
  • Mixtures
  • Solubility
  • Properties of Acids and Bases
  • Acids and Bases in Solution
  • Lab: Acids and Bases
  • Introduction to Motion
  • Speed and Velocity
  • Acceleration
  • Lab: Motion
  • Introduction to Forces
  • Friction
  • Gravity
  • Newton’s Laws of Motion
  • Momentum
  • Lab: Newton’s Laws of Motion
  • Cumulative Exam
  • Work and Power
  • Introduction to Machines
  • Simple Machines
  • Introduction to Energy
  • Potential and Kinetic Energy
  • Energy Transformations
  • Lab: Kinetic Energy
  • Temperature and Thermal Energy
  • Heat
  • Conduction
  • Convection
  • Radiation
  • Lab: Thermal Energy Transfer
  • Introduction to Waves
  • Properties of Waves
  • Wave Interactions
  • Sounds Waves
  • Using Sound
  • The Electromagnetic Spectrum
  • Properties of Light
  • Reflection and Mirrors
  • Refraction and Lenses
  • Using Light
  • Electric Charge
  • Electric Current
  • Ohm’s Law
  • Electric Circuits
  • Magnets and Magnetism
  • Electromagnetism
  • Applications of Electromagnetism
  • Lab: Magnetic and Electric Fields
  • Cumulative Exam

8th Grade Social Studies Scope & Sequence

  • Geography of the Nation and the World
  • Analyzing Historical Sources
  • Research in Social Studies
  • Key Content Review: The Thirteen Colonies
  • The French and Indian War
  • Sons of Liberty
  • The Revolution Begins
  • The Declaration of Independence
  • Fighting the Revolutionary War
  • Creating a Constitution
  • Ratification and the Bill of Rights
  • The Jackson Era
  • Reform Movements
  • Sectionalism in the United States
  • Lincoln
  • The Civil War Begins
  • The Emancipation Proclamation
  • Turning Points
  • End of the War
  • Presidential and Radical Reconstruction
  • Failures of Reconstruction
  • Writing Workshop: Evaluating Research Questions and Sources in History
  • A New Revolution
  • Technology and Society in the Industrial Age
  • A Worker’s Life
  • The Immigrant Experience
  • Urbanization in America
  • Reforming Business and Industry in the Progressive Era
  • Social Reform in the Progressive Era
  • American Imperialism in the Pacific
  • American Imperialism in Latin America
  • The United States Enters WWI
  • Wilson and the Treaty of Versailles
  • Cumulative Exam
  • Civil Rights at the Turn of the Century
  • Women Win the Right to Vote
  • 1920s America
  • Art and Literature of the 1920s
  • The Beginning of the Great Depression
  • Challenges of the Great Depression
  • Goals and Policies of the New Deal
  • Writing Workshop: The New Deal
  • Causes of World War II
  • World War II on the Home Front
  • Winning the War in Europe
  • Winning the War in the Pacific
  • Early Cold War Conflict
  • The War in Korea
  • The Cold War Era
  • Civil Rights: Challenges and Changes
  • Protesting to Demand Rights
  • Expanding Civil Rights
  • The Start of the Vietnam War
  • The Turbulent Sixties
  • Ending the Vietnam Conflict
  • The Nixon Presidency
  • The Ford and Carter Presidency
  • The Regan Years
  • The Cold War Ends
  • The Bush and Clinton Presidencies
  • Terrorism and Its Challenges
  • The Modern Global Economy
  • Into the Information Age
  • Americans and Their Environment
  • Population and Immigration
  • Cumulative Exam

Additional 8th Grade Homeschool Resources

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  • INCLUDES 4 COURSES

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