High School Language Arts – English 2 Course Overview

Time4Learning offers an online, interactive, high school Language Arts curriculum that can be used for homeschool, afterschool, and summer skill building. At the high school level, Time4Learning is organized by courses rather than grade levels, so parents have the option of choosing any four as part of membership.

English 2 is one of four courses covering the Language Arts curriculum at the high school level. English 2 is taught using a combination of multimedia lessons, instructional videos, worksheets, quizzes, tests and both online and offline projects. The English 2 course is designed to prepare students for the English 3 course.

This page includes information about the material covered in the High School English 2 course, in addition to an overview of the high school program structure.

Homeschooling High School – Language Arts / English 2 Course Overview

English 2 is the second of four standards-based language arts courses provided by Time4Learning, and is a great addition to any homeschool approach. Materials are presented within an automated, student-paced system that teaches the lessons, reinforces concepts, time-stamps online activities (for attendance), tracks progress, and keeps printable reports that can be turned into student transcripts or included with homeschool portfolios.

The English 2 course continues teaching the concepts of the elements of story: plot & setting, theme & conflict, narrator & voice, and character. Each element is examined in more depth by analyzing short stories and two novels: Of Mice and Men and The House on Mango Street. Studies will also include other types of literature, including nonfiction, drama, poems, and myths.

When homeschooling with Time4Learning, parents are considered the “teacher of record”, and the home from which they teach is the “school.” Time4Learning offers its members a suite of online tools, teaching resources, and homeschool support to help, but ultimately, it is up to the parents to review and grade their student’s offline lessons & writing projects, compare Time4Learning to their state standards, and make sure all graduation requirements are met.

Below, you will find a brief summary the lessons covered in each chapter of the high school Language Arts / English 2 course.

Chapter 1 – Plot and Setting

In this chapter students will learn about Plot and Setting. They will study fiction and non-fiction excerpts from Horseman in the Sky, Monkey’s Paw, Nobel Prize in Literature Press Release, Niña, The Californian’s Tale, Nevado del Ruiz Volcano, The Bet, Communication: Communication Strategies, Writing: Six Traits of Writing.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Horseman in the Sky – Students will show how plot is influenced by setting and how imagery helps the reader to see the setting. The concept of foreshadowing will be reviewed.
  • Monkey’s Paw – Students will look at the effect of setting, choice of words and suspense on the theme and mood of a piece.
  • Nobel Prize in Literature Press Release – Students will explain the purpose and framework of a press release. They will also look at the differences between main idea and supporting details and the idea of excellence in writing.
  • Niña – Students will look at the way setting changes the actions of the characters while effecting the feel of the piece.
  • The Californian’s Tale – Students will show how plot is influenced by setting. They will also look at how descriptive sensory details and imagery affect the plot. They will examine relationships between characters.
  • Nevado del Ruiz Volcano – Students will look at expository text to decipher maps and technical information. They will learn how to summarize and recognize important and non-important information.
  • The Bet – Students will point out the plot and setting. They will look at the differences in fiction and non-fiction descriptions of the same incident.
  • Communication: Communication Strategies – Students will learn to recognize informal and informal ways to communicate. They will also look at communication issues in the workplace and how culture influences the way people communicate.
  • Writing: Six Traits of Writing – Students will find and understand the six traits of writing which are idea development, organization, voice, sentence fluency, word choice and conventions.

Chapter 2 – Character

In this chapter students will learn the nuances of character development. The lessons in this chapter are A Problem, Functional Text: Cover Letter and Job Application, Daedulus and Icarus, The Ransom of Red Chief, A Raid on the Oyster Pirates, The Cabuliwallah, Communication: Job Interview, Writing: Short Story or Autobiography

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • A Problem – Students will learn how to develop a character. Focus will be on static and dynamic characters and how conflict can be used in developing characters.
  • Functional Text: Cover Letter and Job Application – Students will learn why we use job applications how they are set up and the parts of a productive cover letter.
  • Daedulus and Icarus – Students will look at two different texts to see characterization in Greek mythology.
  • The Ransom of Red Chief – Students will point out the affect of subtleties, dialogue and physical description on how characters are perceived by the reader. They will also learn about flat and round characters.
  • A Raid on the Oyster Pirates – Students will show how flat and round characters are used in an autobiographical short story.
  • The Cabuliwallah – Students will show characterization and how static and dynamic characters are used in an autobiographical short story.
  • Communication: Job Interview – Students will learn how to get ready for a job interview through creating a list of pertinent questions and answers to use in a personal presentation.
  • Writing: Short Story or Autobiography – Students will look at the development of a short story or autobiography which involve purpose, structure, using possessives correctly, drafting and editing.

Chapter 3 – Theme and Conflict

This chapter looks at theme and conflict using short stories and non-fiction texts. Lesson headings in this chapter are Universal Themes, The Interlopers, Leiningen vs. the Ants, Functional Text: Directions and Map, By the Waters of Babylon, Hurricane Threat to Florida, Like the Sun, Communication: Public Speaking Conventions, Writing: Analytical Essay.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Universal Themes – Students will look at universal themes, see the difference between genre and theme and study the associations between plot and theme.
  • The Interlopers – Students will recognize three themes of conflict which are man vs. man, man vs. nature, and man vs. self. They will delve into how to employ active and passive voice and will examine how irony can be used to explain meaning.
  • Leiningen vs. the Ants – Students will learn about the omniscient narrator, examine the theme called conflict and how to develop a character in a personal narrative.
  • Functional Text: Directions and Map – Students will investigate several differing types of functional text which are maps, graphs, pamphlets, and instructions. They will also see how note taking logs can help show steps to take. They will write an instructional manual with the assistance of a cause and effect graphic organizer.
  • By the Waters of Babylon – Students will point out the themes called change & exploration and a journey for self-identity. They will investigate allusion as a literary device and examine point of view and author’s purpose.
  • Hurricane Threat to Florida – Students will examine the headings, subheadings, table of contents, references, appendices, quotes, maps, and graphs to discover the parts of non-fiction text. They will look at the differences in fiction and non-fiction focusing on the theme of man vs. nature in each.
  • Like the Sun – Students will show where historical background, cause and effect, dialogue and theme are used in this passage.
  • Communication: Public Speaking Conventions – Students will determine the correct format for a public speech after looking at the occasion, audience and purpose. They will focus on delivery and presentation. They will learn how to create an attention grabbing introduction and a memorable conclusion.
  • Writing: Analytical Essay – Students will compose an analytical essay. They will include a thesis statement with supporting facts while targeting on purpose and structure. They will be expected to use gerunds, infinitives, and participles as they revise and edit their work.

Chapter 4 – Narrator and Voice

This chapter looks at narrator and voice using short stories and non-fiction passages. The lessons in this chapter include story of an hour, Beware of the Dog, Tell-Tale Heart, Three Poems About America, What War Looks Like, Writing: Reflective Essay.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Story of an Hour – Students will consider how narration impacts the characters, plot and tone of the piece. They will also recognize the third person point of view.
  • Beware of the Dog – While reading, students will make predictions by employing the strategy of question-synthesize-infer.
  • Tell-Tale Heart – Students will recognize the first person point of view and how it influences the characters, mood, tone and plot. They will also look at how symbolism can be used to make plot predictions.
  • Three Poems About America – Students will look at three poems focusing on authors’ perspectives, corresponding themes and topics.
  • What War Looks Like – Students will recognize first person narrator. They will sort out fact from opinion and consider the contrasts in objective and subjective news reporting.
  • Writing: Reflective Essay – Students will compose a reflective essay that contains a thesis statement. They will place emphasis on purpose and structure as they revise and edit their work. They will also pay attention to subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.

Chapter 5 – Novel Study: Of Mice and Men

This chapter the novel is the focus of study. You will find these lessons in this chapter, Of Mice and Men: Background, Of Mice and Men: Part 1, Of Mice and Men: Part 2, Of Mice and Men: Part 3, Of Mice and Men: Part 4, Of Mice and Men: Part 5, Of Mice and Men: Part 6, Communication: Oral Response to Literature, Writing: Chronological Essay.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Of Mice and Men: Background – Students will learn about the Great Depression and the author’s biography in preparation for reading the novel.
  • Of Mice and Men: Part 1 – Students will study Of Mice and Men to discover the genre, setting, plot, theme, voice, dialogue, characterization, and foreshadowing.
  • Of Mice and Men: Part 2 – Students will examine the novel in search of symbolism, motif, setting, character, and theme development.
  • Of Mice and Men: Part 3 – Students will investigate characterization, dialogue, theme, plot, motif, and symbolism.
  • Of Mice and Men: Part 4 – Students will inspect plot, motif, setting, characterization, and theme. They will also look at how foreshadowing can be employed to build suspense.
  • Of Mice and Men: Part 5 – Students will find the motif and plot in the novel. They will also look at how character is developed.
  • Of Mice and Men: Part 6 – Using the text, students will point out characterization, plot, setting, theme, motif, and symbolism. They will investigate how omniscient narrator is used in this novel.
  • Communication: Oral Response to Literature – Students will look at the reasons for, the parts of and the framework of oral responses to literature.
  • Writing: Chronological Essay – Students will compose a chronological essay in which they will place emphasis on purpose, structure and the writing process as they revise and edit their work. They will be asked to employ transition and sequence words.

Chapter 6 – Poetry

This chapter investigates poetry by looking at a selection of poems. Lessons covered are Tanka and Haiku, Sonnets: English and Italian, Lyric Poem: Birches, Lyric Poem: The Children’s Hour, Communication: The Art of Storytelling, Writing: Descriptive Essay.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Tanka and Haiku – Students will analyze the differences in tanka and haiku as they look at rhyme pattern, meter and visualization.
  • Sonnets: English and Italian– Students will analyze the differences in English and Italian sonnets as they consider the rhyme scheme and structure of sonnets.
  • Lyric Poem: Birches – Students will look at the structure of lyric poems which encompasses the pattern of rhythm without rhyme, alliteration, repetition, and sensory language.
  • Communication: The Art of Storytelling – Students will learn the art of storytelling by focusing on the reasons for it, the history of it, and it’s structure and elements.
  • Writing: Descriptive Essay – Students will compose a descriptive essay in which they will place emphasis on purpose and structure as they revise and edit their work. They will be asked to employ comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs.

Chapter 7 – Nonfiction

Nonfiction passages are the focus of this chapter. Included lessons are, The American Promise-LBJ, Inaugural Speech: John F. Kennedy, Functional Text: Formal vs. Informal Letter, News Article vs. Eyewitness Account: Tsunami, Memoir Excerpt: Sandra Day O’Connor, Communication: Plan and Deliver a Speech, Writing: Expository Essay.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • The American Promise-LBJ – Students will dissect a persuasive speech looking for how the speaker uses emotional appeal, appeal to authority and word choice. They will also investigate how the speaker explains the problem, and gives a solution and evidence to support his solution.
  • Inaugural Speech: John F. Kennedy – Students will determine the elements, structure, techniques, and purpose of a motivational speech. They will also look at the author’s purpose and its theme.
  • Functional Text: Formal vs. Informal Letter – Students will compare formal and informal letters to determine the purpose, elements and structure.
  • News Article vs. Eyewitness Account: Tsunami – Students will compare a news article and an eyewitness account to determine the purpose, elements and structure. They will then compose a brief essay looking at the differences in the way the same topic is handled in two separate genres.
  • Memoir Excerpt: Sandra Day O’Connor – Students will look at a memoir/autobiography to investigate the author’s purpose, the structure, characterization, and elements.
  • Communication: Plan and Deliver a Speech – Students will pay attention to their purpose, audience, how to use the media, techniques for delivery, and structure as they design and then give a speech.
  • Writing: Expository Essay – Students will craft an expository essay employing the writing process. They will learn how to brainstorm, research, take notes, form a thesis statement, use the five paragraph format, give supporting details, and pay attention to sentence structure including dependent and independent clauses.

Chapter 8 – Epic, Legend, Myth

In this chapter students will study epic, legend and myth. They will complete lessons on Hero Legend: Hercules, Contemporary Hero: Christopher Reeve, Myth: Echo and Narcissus, Word Origins, Writing: Technical Document.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Hero Legend: Hercules – Students will look at how Hercules is characterized in the role of hero in myths and legends.
  • Contemporary Hero: Christopher Reeve – Students will employ former knowledge, give supporting evidence, and consider similarities and differences to understand what a hero is.
  • Myth: Echo and Narcissus – Students will look at word origins and characterization to understand the links between Greek mythology and modern day stories.
  • Word Origins – Students will study etymologies, Greek, Latin and Anglo Saxon roots, morphemes, prefixes and suffixes to gain an understanding of word origins.
  • Writing: Technical Document – Students will compose a technical document in which they will determine the reasons for and necessary parts of meeting minutes. They will place emphasis on correct spelling and grammar as they revise and edit their work. They will be asked to include bullets, headings, indentations, bold fonts and italics to give the piece structure.

Chapter 9 – Drama

In this chapter students will learn about drama. Students will study excerpts from Moscow Art Theatre, The Proposal, Globe Theatre, Julius Caesar Act 3, Scene 1, Functional Text: Prepare Advertisement, Writing: Compare and Contrast Essay.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Moscow Art Theatre – Students will determine the use of chronological structure, the difference between fact and opinion, and the author’s purpose.
  • The Proposal – Students will be introduced to farce as a form of drama. They will learn the proper terminology for stage directions, and look at how dialogue is used to develop character.
  • Globe Theatre – Students will learn to use the table of contents and index in nonfiction texts. They will also look at the similarities and differences in the Globe Theatre and the Moscow Art Theatre.
  • Julius Caesar Act 3, Scene 1 – Students will look at character, setting and plot. They will discover how the layout of the theatre effects the actions in the play. They will examine characters, monologue, soliloquy, and summarizing as ways to make sense of Shakespearean language.
  • Functional Text: Prepare Advertisement – Students will investigate the reasons for, parts of, and format of an advertisement for a school play.
  • Writing: Compare and Contrast Essay – Students will compose a compare and contrast essay. They will decide the purpose and include all the elements, a thesis statement, and supporting details. Emphasis will be placed on the structures of whole to whole, similarities to differences, and point to point. For grammar review they will be asked to use parallelism.

Chapter 10 – Research

In this chapter students will learn how to write a research paper. These are the included lessons, Research Process Part 1: Question-Narrow Topic, Research Process Part 2: Primary/Secondary, Research Process Part 3: Synthesize/Notetaking, Research Process Part 4: Organize and Draft, Research Process Part 5: Thesis/Citations, Writing: Research Paper, Communication: Expository Presentation.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Research Process Part 1: Question-Narrow Topic – Students will learn how to choose a topic that is not too general and how to come up with questions about that topic.
  • Research Process Part 2: Primary/Secondary – Students will learn where to find information and test primary and secondary sources for their research.
  • Research Process Part 3: Synthesize/Notetaking – Students will learn to sift through what is necessary information for their notes. They will learn to look at the merit of the information they gather.
  • Research Process Part 4: Organize and Draft – Students will be taught how to arrange their notes, craft an outline and first draft.
  • Research Process Part 5: Thesis/Citations – Students will learn how to form a thesis statement and the proper ways to cite sources.
  • Writing: Research Paper – Students will put their new information to work by writing a research paper. They will go through the levels of both the writing and research processes placing attention on topic, research and citing sources correctly. Emphasis will also be placed on employing complete and complex sentences.
  • Communication: Expository Presentation – Students will explain the purpose and framework of an expository presentation as well as write a thesis statement, and give supporting evidence.

Chapter 11 – Novel: House on Mango Street

This chapter investigates the novel House on Mango Street. Lessons are broken down into the following headings, House on Mango Street: Background, House on Mango Street: Part 1, House on Mango Street: Part 2, House on Mango Street: Part 3, House on Mango Street: Part 4, House on Mango Street: Part 5, House on Mango Street: Part 6, Communication: Narrative Presentation, Writing: Book Review.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • House on Mango Street: Background – Students will read up on the author’s background, characterization, motif, setting, inference, sequence of events, voice, and point of view to gain a point of reference before reading the novel.
  • House on Mango Street: Part 1 – Students will investigate the author’s style to understand motif, symbol, theme, conflict and enhanced meaning.
  • House on Mango Street: Part 2 – Students will scrutinize motif, the theme coming-of-age, symbolism, plot, conflict, voice, point of view and how to interpret dialogue.
  • House on Mango Street: Part 3 – Students will examine theme, internal conflict and plot. They will inspect quotations and boil down information.
  • House on Mango Street: Part 4 – Students will look at foreshadowing and characterization. They will analyze descriptive language.Students will look at foreshadowing and characterization. They will analyze descriptive language.
  • House on Mango Street: Part 5 – Students will investigate motif, style, how to use figurative language, internal conflict, symbolism in poetry, and the theme self-identity.
  • House on Mango Street: Part 6 – Students will look at different genres to discover universal theme. They will examine theme, plot, decipher dialogue, style, setting, and character development.
  • Communication: Narrative Presentation – Students will decide the reasons for, the parts of, and format of a narrative presentation.
  • Writing: Book Review – Students will look at the parts and format of a written book review. They will revise and edit with an emphasis on run-on sentences.

Time4Learning High School Courses – Program Structure

Time4Learning high school offers an online, interactive curriculum for ninth through twelfth grade that correlates to state standards. The majority of Time4Learning members use it for homeschool, although some use it as an afterschool alternative to tutoring, or for summer study.

High school is distinguished from the PreK-8th grades by an increased emphasis on higher order thinking skills, the effective combination of video with animation, and an increased number of writing projects designed to help students achieve overall college and career readiness. It is organized into courses that cover math, language arts, science, and social studies, with the optional elective courses of health and economics/finance also available.

Students use their own individual login to access Time4Learning’s secure, ad-free learning environment. An automated system combines multimedia lessons, instructional videos, printable worksheets, quizzes, tests and both online and offline projects to teach the materials. The system also reinforces concepts, tracks progress, and keeps printable reports that parents can turn into student transcripts or include with homeschool portfolios.

In addition to our standards-based curriculum, Time4Learning members have access to a suite of online tools, lesson plans, teaching resources, and homeschool support to help them along their journey. Parents are considered the “teacher of record”, and the home from which they teach is the “school.” It is up to the parents to review and grade their student’s offline lessons & writing projects, compare Time4Learning to their state standards, and make sure all graduation requirements are met.

It is also important to mention that Time4Learning is a curriculum provider– not a school. Therefore, Time4Learning cannot be accredited, nor can homeschooled students “graduate” from Time4Learning. Visit our homeschool high school resources page for additional tools, tips and high school resources on this topic.

Time4Learning’s secure, automated learning system teaches the lessons, reinforces concepts with plenty of practice, tracks, progress, and keeps printable reports that parents can turn into transcripts or include with homeschool portfolios.

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