High School US History II Course

Time4Learning offers an online, interactive high school curriculum that correlates to state standards. It can be used as a primary homeschool curriculum, a supplement to your current curriculum and as an afterschool or summer skill building program. At the high school level, Time4Learning is organized by courses rather than grade levels, so parents have the option of choosing any four as part of membership.

The US History II curriculum is one of five history courses offered at the high school level. US History II is taught using a combination of multimedia lessons, instructional videos, worksheets, quizzes, tests and both online and offline projects. The US History II course is designed to prepare students for continued study at the college level.

Chapter 1 – Introduction to US History II

The materials in this chapter help students consider the importance of learning history, the social sciences, and geography to help understand the world around us. They also review highlights of events, periods, and people covered in US History I. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on the definitions and uses of history, the social sciences, and geography, and on major events in the US during and after the Civil War.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – History and Social Science – Students explore what history and social science are and how they and the study of geography can help us understand history.
  • Lesson 2 – Review of US History I – Students briefly review American history from early civilizations through European exploration, colonial times, the new nation, westward expansion, and the crises leading to the Civil War.

Chapter 2 – The Civil War Era, 1857-1865

The materials in this chapter introduce the US Civil War including the years of growing conflict, secession, its causes, events, and consequences. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on the growing conflict, secession, early battles and home front conditions, the Battle of Gettysburg, the March to the Sea, African Americans before and during the war, the end of the war.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – Growing Conflict – Students consider the conflicts in this time including the Dred Scott Decision and sectionalism. Students consider the rise of the Republican Party and Abraham Lincoln and analyze one of the Lincoln-Douglas debates.
  • Lesson 2 – Secession – Students contrast events in the North and South and consider the secession of South Carolina and Fort Sumter.
  • Lesson 3 – The Early War – Students consider battles at the Front, identifying each side’s advantages. Students follow battles and events by analyzing Civil War images. Students consider events on the home front, away from the fighting.
  • Lesson 4 – The Ascendency of the Union – Students consider the Battle of Gettysburg and the March to the Sea. Students explore Gettysburg through a virtual tour.
  • Lesson 5 – African Americans and the Civil War – Students compare the lives of African Americans in the North and South before the war. Students explore the lives of African Americans during the war and examine contemporary pictures for evidence.
  • Lesson 6 – The End of the War – Students follow the events at the end of the war learning about Grant and Lee, the surrender, and outcomes. Students analyze a timeline of events from 1863-1865.

Chapter 3 – Reconstruction, 1865-1877

The materials in this chapter analyze the period following the Civil War, Lincoln’s plans for reconstruction and those of a radical congress, the problems of the freed slaves and the successes and failures of Reconstruction. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on the plans and problems of Reconstruction, the problems of the freed slaves and the South after the war, and the effectiveness of Reconstruction as a strategy.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – Presidential Reconstruction – Students examine the assassination of Lincoln. They consider Lincoln’s plans for reconstruction and contrast them with those favored by Johnson.
  • Lesson 2 – Radical Reconstruction – Students trace the molding of reconstruction by a radical congress. Students consider the problems of the freed slaves and the effects of industrialization and Reconstruction on the South.
  • Lesson 3 – End of Reconstruction – Students analyze the issues and effectiveness of Reconstruction, consider the election of 1876, and read and analyze the 14th Amendment.

Chapter 4 – The Gilded Age, 1865-1900

The materials in this chapter examine this period of wealth and elegance in America, tracing the growth of industrialization, the railroads, westward expansion, and considering their effects on the land, people, and economic development of the country. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on the industrialization of the United States, the Transcontinental Railroad and the closing of the frontier, and societal and political issues of the Gilded Age.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1- Industrial United States – Students consider the changes to labor, wealth, and cities caused by industrialization. Students examine the lives and actions of the captains of industry of the time.
  • Lesson 2 – The North American West– Students explore the building of the Transcontinental Railroad, how it brought standardization of time, the closing of the frontier, changes for Native Americans, and a rise of conservationism.
  • Lesson 3 – Issues in the Gilded Age – Students consider societal changes during this period, including African American segregation, immigration policy, and monetary policy. Students compare political movements caught between the original agrarian society and the new industrial society.

Chapter 5 – Modern US, 1890-1920

The materials in this chapter examine the transitions that the United States made both domestically and internationally to become a world power. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on emergence of the US as a world power, reform in the United States, and the events and causes of the Great War.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – The United States Emerges – Students examine events at home and abroad that shaped the United States. Students consider United States dealings with Latin America, East Asia, and Spain. Students look closely at Presidents McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt.
  • Lesson 2 – Reform in the United States – Students explore the reforms and reformers during this period including, the Progressive Movement, Theodore Roosevelt and the Square Deal, Women’s Suffrage, and the Harlem Renaissance.
  • Lesson 3 – The Great War – Students examine worldwide events and trends during this era that led to conflict. They analyze the move of the United States from neutral power to Ally. Students trace the events of the war, the Treaty of Versailles, and the League of Nations.

Chapter 6 – Post-War US, 1918-1940

The materials in this chapter examine life in the US after the Great War. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on the events and culture of the 1920s, the economic collapse and the Great Depression, and the Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – The Roaring ’20s – Students explore the many changes during the 1920s including the booming post-war economy and the effects of Prohibition.
  • Lesson 2 – Collapse – Students examine the Great Depression in detail, its causes, its effect on society, government response, and the worldwide depression.
  • Lesson 3 – The Presidency of Franklin Roosevelt – Students explore events during the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the New Deal, Social Security and Medicare, and the culture of the 1930s.

Chapter 7 – World War II, 1940-1945

The materials in this chapter explore the actions and inaction of the United States in World War II and the impact of the war on the world. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on the causes of the war and US reluctance to enter it, the events of the war, and the impact the war had upon the United States and the world.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – The Seeds of War – Students trace the rise of fascism and the US response – moving through the stages of isolationism, neutrality, the Lend-Lease program, and finally to the response to the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
  • Lesson 2 – The United States at War – Students identify the successes of Germany and Japan early in the war. They learn about the Office of War information and its role in the war on international fronts. Students trace turning points in the war and analyze events leading to victory in Europe and victory in Japan.
  • Lesson 3 – The Impact of War – Students explore the impact of the war including the Holocaust, economic growth during the war, and life on the home front including internment, rationing, and migration within the US.

Chapter 8 – Post-War US, 1945-1960

The materials in this chapter consider changes in the US after World War II, especially the effects of the Cold War. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on important events and changes in society during the postwar era, the rise of the Iron Curtain, and the Cold War.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – The United States in the Postwar Era – Students trace changes to US society in the wake of the war, paying particular attention to economics, technological advances, and changes in family structure. Students will explore changes in youth culture and the beginnings of the war in Vietnam.
  • Lesson 2 – Cold War – Students explore the divisions of Europe and the rise of the Iron Curtain. Students trace Cold War events through the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Chapter 9 – American Evolution, 1945-1980

The materials in this chapter consider social changes in the United States after World War II, including civil rights in the 1960s, and social and political change in the 1970s. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on key people and events of the civil rights movement, events and changes in the United States during the 1960s, and political change in the world and the US during the 1970s.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – New Frontiers – Students trace the events of the civil rights movement, including key people and events and focusing on the writings of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the presidency of John F. Kennedy.
  • Lesson 2 – The United States in the 1960s – Students examine the role of the United States in the world in the 1960s. They consider religious, political, social, and economic changes during this period.
  • Lesson 3 – United States Politics, 1974-1979 – Students consider the political and social changes in the United States during the 1970s as well as civil wars throughout the world that came as a result of decolonization. Students trace the events that led to the resignation of Richard M. Nixon.

Chapter 10 – US: World Power, 1980-2007

The materials in this chapter evaluate the post-Cold War world and predict the role of the United States in a 21st-century world.It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on events and ideologies during the Reagan Administration, recent changes to lifestyles in the US, changes in the world and the nation in the 1990s, and events in the early 21st century.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – The Reagan Administration – Students trace the rise in conservatism after World War II, including the election of Ronald Reagan. Students explore the collapse of the Soviet Union and develop an understanding of the Iran-Contra affair.
  • Lesson 2 – Lifestyles – Students evaluate recent changes to society and culture. Students consider technological advances and cultural diffusion.
  • Lesson 3 – The World of the 1990s – Students consider the presidency of Bill Clinton, including his impeachment, the Anti-Apartheid movement in the US, and the history of terrorism.
  • Lesson 4 – The 21st Century – Students compare and consider the administrations of Reagan, George HW Bush, Clinton, and George W Bush. Students analyze the causes of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and the conflicts in southwest Asia.

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