High School US History I Course

Time4Learning offers an online, interactive high school curriculum that correlates to state standards. It can be used as a primary homeschool curriculum, a supplement to your current curriculum and as an afterschool or summer skill building program. At the high school level, Time4Learning is organized by courses rather than grade levels, so parents have the option of choosing any four as part of membership.

The US History I curriculum is one of five history courses offered at the high school level. US History I is taught using a combination of multimedia lessons, instructional videos, worksheets, quizzes, tests and both online and offline projects. The US History I course is designed to prepare students for the US History II course.

Chapter 1 – Introduction to Social Science

The materials in this chapter introduce the study of history and the social sciences as a way of understanding our world. It is organized into sections that teach, reinforce, and test students on these concepts.

The lesson in this chapter covers:

  • Lesson 1 – History and social science – Students will define history and the social sciences and explore why the study of history, the social sciences, and geography are relevant in our world. In writing, students compare evidence used by geographers with evidence used by historians.

Chapter 2 – The New World

The materials in this chapter introduce different regions of the world in the period just prior to the Age of Exploration and the factors that led to European exploration and American colonization. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on Native Americans to 1500, Europe in the fifteenth century, the African kingdoms, and the voyages of discovery prior to 1492.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – Native Americans, prehistory to 1500– Students examine the development and migrations of early people. Students analyze trade, government, artifacts, and culture in North, Central and South America.
  • Lesson 2 – Europe in the fifteenth century – Students examine Europe’s ties to the American identity and how fifteenth century events led to the colonization of America. Students analyze the rise of the European nations and their monarchs.
  • Lesson 3 – Africa – Students study the African kingdoms before European influence, including religion, culture, economic, and political elements of the societies. Students examine the role of slavery in Africa, the triangle trade, and the long-term effects slavery had upon Africa.
  • Lesson 4 – Voyages of Discovery Prior to 1492 – Students examine Early Portuguese explorations in search of a trade route to Asia. Students will consider technology new during the period and how its use may have contributed to navigation and to longer voyages.

Chapter 3 – Exploration and Colonization

The materials in this chapter introduce the exploration and colonization of the Americas beginning in the late fifteenth century, tracing the development of the thirteen English colonies. It is organized into sections that will teach, reinforce, and test students on the concepts of Spain and Portugal, France’s Empire, the Mid-Atlantic and Chesapeake Colonies, the New England Colonies, and the Southern colonies.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – Spain and Portugal in the Western Hemisphere – Students examine how Spanish and Portuguese explorations affected indigenous peoples of North America. Students will analyze and compare the relations between the Spanish and the indigenous peoples and the Portuguese and the indigenous peoples.
  • Lesson 2 – France’s Empire – Students will learn about French explorers and their interactions with the indigenous peoples in Canada and Louisiana. Students will map explorer’s routes and write short biographies of famous explorers.
  • Lesson 3 – The Mid-Atlantic and Chesapeake Colonies – Students will examine and compare and contrast the settlements by the English of Maryland and Virginia. Students will also consider the colony of Pennsylvania and compare the political, social, religious, artistic, and economic factors in the Mid-Atlantic and Chesapeake colonies.
  • Lesson 4 – The New England Colonies – Students will consider the New England colonies and the part that religion played in the formation of both Plymouth Colony and Massachusetts Bay Colony. Students will create a map of the colonies.
  • Lesson 5 – The Southern Colonies – Students will learn about the colonies of Carolina and Georgia. They will explore the effects geography had upon the colonies, comparing them to the New England colonies. Students will make a timeline of important events and trace the connection between Carolina and Barbados.

Chapter 4 – English North America to 1770

The materials in this chapter introduce the changes in the English colonies from their beginnings in the 17th century until the eve of the American Revolution. It is organized into sections that teach, reinforce and test students on the concepts of immigration and slavery, North America and England, regional differences in the colonies, and England’s wars for empire.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – Immigration and Slavery – Students consider indentured servitude and compare and contrast it with slavery. They will explore the relationships between colonists and Native Americans and consider increasing tensions between the societies as European settlers moved westward.
  • Lesson 2 – North America and England – Students consider the relationships between the American colonies and England, including their economic and political ties and tensions. Students explore primary source texts and cartoons from the period.
  • Lesson 3 – Regional Differences in the Colonies – Students examine different economic, social, geographic, and political pressures and how they influenced different regional identities in the colonies. Students learn about the causes and effects of the Great Awakening.
  • Lesson 4 – England’s Wars for Empire – Students explore European wars for empire and how the events caused continued conflict. Students will analyze how the wars in Europe ultimately affected the colonies.

Chapter 5 – Independence and Republic

The materials in this chapter introduce and consider British policies and events in the colonies as well as economic and political events in England that led to the Declaration of Independence. It is organized into sections that teach, reinforce and test students on the causes of the American Revolution, the events surrounding the Declaration of Independence, and the War for Independence.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – Causes of the Revolution – Students analyze the events that led to discontent and revolution in the American colonies. Events considered include the French and Indian War, the French and Haitian revolutions, the financial crisis in England, the Stamp Act, and acts of resistance in the colonies.
  • Lesson 2 – Declaring Independence – Students consider the events and ideas that lead to the American Revolution. Events and influences covered include: the Battle of Lexington and Concord, the Second Continental Congress, Thomas Paine’s Common Sense, and the Declaration of Independence.
  • Lesson 3 – The War for Independence – Students evaluate the strategies of the armies and generals involved in the Revolution. Students will consider: Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Charleston, Cowpens, the entrance of France and Spain into the war, and Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris.

Chapter 6 – Confederation and Constitution

The materials in this chapter introduce and consider the Articles of Confederation, the Constitutional Convention, and the processes used to create and ratify the US Constitution. It is organized into sections that teach, reinforce and test students on the concepts of confederation, the creation of the US Constitution, the ratification of the US Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lessson 1 – Confederation – Students consider the weakness of the Articles of Confederation and the effects of Shay’s Rebellion. Students study the Northwest Ordinance as a successful policy for westward land expansion.
  • Lesson 2 – Creating the Constitution – Students analyze the Constitutional Convention and the process and compromises that led to the development of the US Constitution. Students examine the components of the Constitution and how it limits and controls government of the new nation.
  • Lesson 3 – Ratifying the Constitution – Students analyze the issues behind the debate over the US Constitution and Federalism. Students explore reasons why Anti-Federalists feared government power.
  • Lesson 4 – The Bill of Rights – Students examine the three branches of the US Government and the checks and balances included in the governmental structure. Students examine the Bill of Rights, how it related to the grievances in the Declaration of Independence and how it relates to life in the US today.

Chapter 7 – The New Republic

The materials in this chapter follow the development of politics in the United States, including political parties, foreign affairs, and the War of 1812. It is organized into sections that teach, reinforce and test students on the Federalists and early political parties, the growth of US diplomacy, the age of Jefferson, the War of 1812, and the Era of Good Feelings and the Monroe Doctrine.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – Federalists and Political Parties – Students explore the rise of political parties and a political culture in the US. Students analyze the proposal for a national bank and politicians’ reactions. Students identify legacies of the presidency of George Washington.
  • Lesson 2 – The Growth of United States Diplomacy – Students explore early US diplomacy and its tendency to be isolationist and neutral. Students evaluate the roles of Britain, France and Spain in US diplomacy. Students build a timeline of important events.
  • Lesson 3 – The Age of Jefferson – Students consider the Peaceful Revolution. Students explore the development of an American identity. Students explore the events leading to the Louisiana Purchase and the details of the agreement. Students analyze the developing power of the Supreme Court. Students define precedent and the clauses of the Constitution in terms of Supreme Court decisions.
  • Lesson 4 – The War of 1812 – Students analyze the causes that led to the War of 1812, including the Embargo Act and the Napoleonic Wars. Students use a flow chart to trace the effects of certain events of the war. Students analyze James Madison’s foreign policies and the events of the war itself.
  • Lesson 5 – The Era of Good Feelings and the Monroe Doctrine – Students trace the change in diplomatic relations with European nations after the War of 1812. Students analyze how the decline of Spain in Latin America led to increased territory for the United States. Students assess the legacies of the Jeffersonian Era.

Chapter 8 – Expansion and Conflict

The materials in this chapter follow the development of the age of industry and its influences on the new nation’s economy and culture, including nationalism following the war of 1812 and the presidency of Andrew Jackson. It is organized into sections that teach, reinforce and test students on the rise of industry caused by invention, the events leading to the Missouri Compromise, and Andrew Jackson’s presidency including the Trail of Tears.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – The Rise of Industry – Students analyze the US economy in the years after the War of 1812. Students note economic differences in the North, South, and West, the South’s growing dependence on slavery and the widening of class stratification. Students explore the changes caused by the invention and use of steam power, industrialization, and the telegraph.
  • Lesson 2 – Sectionalism and Nationalism – Students explore the rise of nationalism in the United States and explore the conflicts and compromises that led to the Missouri Compromise.
  • Lesson 3 – The Age of Jackson – Students consider the events of the elections of 1824 and 1828 and the rise of the Democratic Party. Students explore the Tariff Debate, the Nullification Crisis and it fallout. Students analyze events of Andrew Jackson’s presidency, how they changed politics and the tragedy of the Trail of Tears.

Chapter 9 – American Life 1815-1860

The materials in this chapter evaluate the effects of the second Great Awakening including abolition, the women’s movement, Romanticism and Transcendentalism. It is organized into sections that teach, reinforce and test students on the events and ideologies of antebellum reform. Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – Antebellum Reform 1 – Students explore the events and popular ideologies before the Civil War including the Second Great Awakening and the anti-slavery movement.
  • Lesson 2 – Antebellum Reform 2 – Students trace the women’s movement from colonial times through the antebellum period. Students will analyze the effects of Romanticism and Transcendentalism on the culture and women’s movement.

Chapter 10 – Expansion and Manifest Destiny

The materials in this chapter trace westward expansion into the Louisiana and Northwest Territories during the first half of the nineteenth century. It is organized into sections that teach, reinforce and test students on the events of westward movement, war with Mexico, the Gold Rush and expansion of slavery and the Missouri Compromise of 1850.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Lesson 1 – Westward Movement – Students analyze the factors in settlement of the Louisiana Territory and the Northwest Territory. Students explore factors that led settlers to move west and factors that deterred them. Students consider the effects of conflicts with the Native American inhabitants of the land.
  • Lesson 2 – War with Mexico – Students explore causes of the Mexican-American War. They consider the events that led to Texas’s independence from Mexico, creation as an independent republic, and annexation to the United States. Students place events in order on a timeline.
  • Lesson 3 – Expansion and Disruption – Students explore the changes to America brought by the Gold Rush, the Mexican-American War, the expansion of slavery and the Compromise of 1850. Students read primary source documents and write about what they have learned about territorial expansion.

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