Time4Learning https://www.time4learning.com Homeschool, Afterschool, Skill Building Fri, 21 Sep 2018 15:15:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Hands-On Science & Math Activities for Homeschoolers https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/hands-on-science-math-activities-for-homeschoolers/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/hands-on-science-math-activities-for-homeschoolers/#respond Fri, 21 Sep 2018 12:00:16 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=18248 It’s the start of the homeschool year and you want your child to be on top of their math and science game! Be sure to add some hands-on activities in your homeschool schedule to keep your students engaged. Below are several ideas to get you started: Hands-On Science Activities Grab a few items from your […]]]>

It’s the start of the homeschool year and you want your child to be on top of their math and science game! Be sure to add some hands-on activities in your homeschool schedule to keep your students engaged. Below are several ideas to get you started:

Hands-On Science Activities

  1. Grab a few items from your house like a small toy, bar of soap, empty plastic bottle and construct a hypothesis as to whether it will sink or float. Next, fill a tub or sink with water and conduct your experiment. What were the results?
  2. How long do you think it will take an ice cube to melt outside? In your refrigerator? In a cup on your counter? Make predictions and then get your stopwatch and find out. Once you’re done, record the data and compare. What do you think affected the results?
  3. What’s the forecast? Create a weather log for a few weeks and include important information like temperature, humidity, precipitation, and wind speed. Learn to convert Fahrenheit to Celsius and vice versa. Take it a step further and find out what kind of tools Meteorologists use to help them predict the weather.
  4. Come up with a recipe for the whole family to enjoy. Maybe a comforting soup, healthy salad, or tasty dessert. Find out which fruits and vegetables are in season and grab your apron. Be sure to include the necessary ingredients, measurements, and instructions.
  5. Since the weather will soon start to cool down, do some research to find out what the coldest places are in the United States and around the world. Create an infographic with facts like coldest temperature ever reached, type of climate, average annual snowfall, and native plants and animals.

Hands-On Math Activities

  1. At the beginning of the school year, add items such as pebbles, coins, or beads to a jar. Once the year is over, estimate how many you’ve collected and then count the items to see how well you fared.
  2. The next time you have pizza, practice your fractions. Identify quarters, thirds, and equivalent fractions as you eat, then try adding and subtracting to discover new fractions.
  3. Shapes are all around: at home, the park, the grocery store. When you find one, identify it: square, triangle, hexagon, then count the angles and determine if they are right angles, acute, or obtuse.
  4. Going on vacation in the next few months? Whether you’re flying or driving, find out what the total number of miles is that you’ll be travelling. You can also locate your destination on a map and write down the GPS coordinates. Not going on vacation? Pick three places you’d like to travel to and find out the same information.
  5. Create a pie graph or bar chart detailing the extracurricular activities you plan on doing this year. Maybe you want to spend 40% of your time playing sports, 20% learning a new instrument, 30% with your homeschool group or co-op, and 10% volunteering. Don’t forget to include a title, key, and of course, data. Once the year is over, create another one with how you actually spent your year and compare the two.

Printable Math Worksheets

Looking for more ways to introduce math into your homeschool? Download this printable math packet for K-12 students and start practicing or advancing your math skills today.

Start Practicing Now!

Looking for More Math and Science Activities?

Check out Time4Learning’s PreK-12th online math curriculum and online science curriculum that helps your child develop their skills with interactive, student-paced lessons and activities. Click on the links below for more science and math fun!

Sign up for our newsletter to get regular insights and practical advice about homeschooling, skill-building, and after-school enrichment.

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Connecticut Field Trips for Homeschoolers https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/connecticut-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/connecticut-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/#respond Fri, 21 Sep 2018 11:00:34 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=18402 One of the best perks of homeschooling is having the freedom to learn about the things that interest your family. With so many attractions, natural landscapes, and exciting destinations, there is no shortage of field trip ideas in Connecticut. Finding ways to delve deeper into a particular unit of study or reinforce your child’s current […]]]>

One of the best perks of homeschooling is having the freedom to learn about the things that interest your family. With so many attractions, natural landscapes, and exciting destinations, there is no shortage of field trip ideas in Connecticut. Finding ways to delve deeper into a particular unit of study or reinforce your child’s current homeschool curriculum is easy in the Constitution State.

Below are fun field trip ideas in Connecticut categorized by geographical area. You can use this printable map of Connecticut from Time4Learning to start making your plans.

Plus, as a bonus, we’ve included a free download of Time4Learning lesson plans at the end of this post that might be the perfect supplement for each trip.

Home education is not the same in every state. Make sure you’re getting the information you need to start homeschooling in the Constitution State.

Homeschool in CT Now!

Homeschool Field Trips in Northwest Connecticut

Northwest CT Field Trips

Homeschool Field Trips in Central Connecticut

Central CT Field Trips
  • Mark Twain House & Museum, Hartford, CT – Fans of this American author whose real name was Samuel Clemens, can visit the place that was his home from 1874 until 1891. Guided tours allow visitors to explore the 3-story, 25-room mansion where he wrote such novels as “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” and “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”.
  • Dinosaur State Park, Rocky Hill, CT – Bring your homeschool science curriculum to life by visiting one of the largest dinosaur track sites in North America. Discovered in 1966, the tracks date back 200 million years. You can explore the geodesic dome which is home to approximately 500 of these tracks as well as life-sized dioramas, interactive displays, and more. Educational films, guided trail walks, and lectures are also available.
  • Connecticut Science Center, Hartford, CT – Explore this nine-story, 154,000 square foot museum on the Riverfront that opened its doors in 2009. Some of the more than 165 interactive exhibits include Engineering Lab, Picture of Health, Energy City, River of Life, and more. The museum hosts several homeschool days and offers homeschoolers several educational programs, memberships and special pricing.
  • Gillette Castle State Park, East Haddam, CT – Bring your history curriculum to life by visiting this medieval fortress lookalike. Once the private home of actor William Gillette, this 24-room castle offers tours, guided trail walks, and more. Visitors can explore the 14,000 square foot home that took five years to build and all its details, including 47 doors, of which no two are alike.
  • Wadsworth Falls State Park, Middletown, CT – Established in 1942, visitors can enjoy the great outdoors and hike or bike the numerous trails at this park that features two waterfalls. Located on the Coginchaug River, families can also fish, swim or picnic in the designated areas.

Homeschool Field Trips in East Connecticut

East CT Field Trips
  • Mystic Aquarium, Mystic, CT – Opened in 1973, this aquarium features a 4D theater, a number of special exhibits, a touch pool, and more. Guests can visit the aquarium’s beluga whales, African penguins, and more. Classes for homeschoolers are available as well as other activities and programs for students.
  • Mystic Seaport Museum, Stonington, CT – If you’re child is into sailing, boats, and all things nautical, a stop at the largest maritime museum in the U.S. is a must. The 19-acre museum is made up of over 60 buildings and is home to a number of historic vessels including a whaling ship built in 1841. Homeschool programs are available, as well as a number of sailing programs, workshops and classes.
  • Submarine Force Museum (USS Nautilus), Groton, CT – This museum, located on the Thames River, is home to a number of historic submarines and replicas, over 33,000 submarine artifacts, and an impressive library with tens of thousands of documents, photos, and books. Visitors can take a self-guided audio tour of the USS Nautilus submarine as well, the first nuclear-powered submarine in the world.
  • Buttonwood Farm, Griswold, CT – Started as a dairy farm in 1975, this family attraction is known for its ice cream and other sweet treats, hayrides, cow train, annual sunflower event, and more. Visitors can also take part in a 7-acre corn maze, pick pumpkins, and pet farm animals during seasonal activities in the fall.

Homeschool Field Trips in Southwest Connecticut

Southwest CT Field Trips
  • Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo, Bridgeport, CT – Opened in 1922, and named after a wealthy farmer who donated over 100 acres of land, this zoo features nine major exhibits including Alligator Alley, New England Farmyard, and W.O.L.F. A number of educational programs are available for students.
  • Stepping Stones Museum for Children, Norwalk, CT – This hands-on children’s museum features a number of interactive exhibits including Energy Lab, ColorCoaster, and Express Yourself. A number of programs, events, and activities are available for families and educators.
  • Bruce Museum, Greenwich, CT – Established in 1912, this art and science museum features a number of exhibits on a wide range of topics including wildlife, Native American history, minerals, and more. Family programs include workshops, gallery tours, and family days.
  • Yale University, New Haven, CTHomeschoolers thinking about college can take a guided tour of this Ivy League university led by undergraduate students. Families with young children can also take part in an architectural treasure hunt. Founded in 1701, Yale is the third oldest higher education institution in the U.S. Five U.S. presidents have graduated from Yale:

Connecticut Field Trips Resource

Is there anything more fun than learning through field trips? To make your experiences at these destinations even more meaningful, Time4Learning members will appreciate this download of free lesson tie-ins.

Download

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Unit Study Supplement: Tennessee Facts, U.S. 16th State https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-tennessee-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-tennessee-facts/#respond Thu, 13 Sep 2018 12:00:39 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=15672 Before European settlers even arrived to the land that would become Tennessee, two native American tribes had already made it their home. One of them, the Cherokees, established a small village called “Tanasi.” Once the land was being developed, settlers decided to keep the name of that small Cherokee Village. This led to the birth […]]]>

Before European settlers even arrived to the land that would become Tennessee, two native American tribes had already made it their home. One of them, the Cherokees, established a small village called “Tanasi.” Once the land was being developed, settlers decided to keep the name of that small Cherokee Village. This led to the birth of the state’s name: Tennessee.

Discover more about the history and geography of the Volunteer State in this homeschool unit study supplement. This is part of Time4Learning’s full series of United States unit study supplements. You can also download our list of PreK-12 interactive lessons that align with your study of interesting facts about Tennessee.

Tennessee Fast Facts

Became a State June 1, 1796
Order it Joined the Union 16th state
State Capital Nashville
State Abbreviation TN
Border States
  • Virgina
  • North Carolina
  • Georgia
  • Alabama
  • Mississippi
  • Arkansas
  • Missouri
State Flag Tennessee State Flag
State Songs
State Flower Irises
State Nicknames The Volunteer State
Notable Tennesseans

Historical Facts About Tennessee

Tennessee was first explored by Europeans in 1540, although it had been inhabited as long as 20,000 years ago. When European settlers first arrived, there were two Native American tribes already established: the Cherokees and the Chickasaw.

The tribes and the settlers were at peace in the early 1700s, but the tribes became angry as the settlers claimed more land. After the French and Indian war, the tribes were removed and Britain gained control of the land in 1763. At this point, Tennessee was just a part of North Carolina, even after the American Revolution ended.

In 1784, Eastern Tennessee tried to become its own state, originally requesting to be called “Franklin.” This lasted until 1788, and all of Tennessee became a U.S. territory in 1789 during George Washington‘s first term as president. Finally, on June 1, 1796. U.S. Congress made Tennessee into a state.

When the Civil War broke out in 1861, Tennessee was originally divided between the Union and Confederacy, but it eventually sided with the Confederacy. Many major battles fought during the Civil War occured in Tennessee, and the Union had lots of control over Tennessee. Later, in 1920, Tennessee became known for its country music due to a popular radio show that started in the state called “The Grand Ole Opry.”

Here are some more historical facts about Tennessee that your homeschooler may find interesting.

880

Inhabited by the Chickasaw and the Cherokee. The Chickasaw were known to live in the west and the Cherokee were in the east.

1540

First explored by Hernando de Soto, who left to seek gold.

1740

Cherokee Village capital was named “Tanasi,” which later developed into the name of the state.

1779

The first city was founded, called Nashborough. This city later developed to become Nashville.

1783

European settlers arrived, the British claimed the land, and removed the Native American Tribes.

1784

Jonesborough was named the first capital of Tennessee, and eastern Tennessee tries to become a state, named “Franklin”.

1785

Capital moved from being in Jonesborough to being in Greeneville.

1789

All of Tennessee became a U.S. Territory.

1796

Tennessee became the 16th state to enter the union, and the capital was moved to Knoxville.

1807

Capital was moved to Kingston for just one day, to satisfy an agreement made with Native Americans. It was moved back to Knoxville the next day.

1812

The state nickname of “The Volunteer State” was received because of the many volunteer soldiers who fought in the War of 1812 that were from Tennessee. The capital was moved to Nashville.

1817

Knoxville became the capital again, for the third time.

1818

Murfreesboro became the capital, which was the sixth city it was moved to.

1826

Nashville became the permanent capital, and has not moved since.

1861

Tennessee was the last state to secede from the Union and join the Confederacy.

1866

Rejoins the Union after the Civil War ends.

1920

Became known for its country music because of a radio show called “The Grand Ole Opry”.

1925

The first official state song was released, called “My Homeland, Tennessee”.

1927

First miniature golf course was started in Chattanooga. It was created to help the hotel gain more bookings.

1970

State became politically divided; the office of the Governor has never been completely Democratic or Republican since.

2012

Tennessee’s 10th state song, “Tennessee,” is created.

Bring history and geography to life with Time4Learning’s interactive online social studies curriculum for grades 2-12.

Geographical Facts About Tennessee

Can your homeschooler locate Tennessee on this printable U.S. map? Tennessee is often referred to as the state of rivers because of how many large and important rivers there are. It is also home of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the most visited national park in the U.S. These are just some of the interesting facts about the Volunteer State’s geography that your homeschooler will find interesting.

To enhance your unit study supplement, explore a map of the state then download our printable Tennessee map below and mark it up with your child. Here are some facts you and your homeschooler may want to note about Tennessee’s geography and its unique features.

  • The highest point in Tennessee is Clingmans Dome, which is 6,643 feet tall. It is located on the border shared with North Carolina, about 50 miles southeast of Knoxville. This dome is a part of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park!
  • Over the years, 6 different cities were named the capital of Tennessee: Jonesborough, located in the northeastern tip of Tennessee; Greeneville, located just 20 miles southwest of Jonesborough; Knoxville, which is 70 miles west of Greeneville; Kingston is 30 miles west of Knoxville; Murfreesboro is 100 miles west of Kingston; and finally, Nashville is 30 miles north of Murfreesboro. Can you locate all these cities on the map?
  • Murfreesboro, one of the previous state capital, is located right in the geographical middle of Tennessee.
  • The flag of Tennessee has three stars on it, and the stars symbolize the three geographical regions in this state: the Great Smoky Mountains, the highlands, and the lowlands. The mountains are in eastern Tennessee, the highlands in central Tennessee, and lowlands in western Tennessee.
  • Tennessee’s western border, shared with Arkansas, is very squigle-y. This is because the border was carved out by the Mississippi river!
  • The Norris Dam was the first hydroelectric dam ever built, and is located just north of Knoxville. The town was created specifically to house construction workers that built the dam.
  • Lookout Mountain, which is 1,850 feet high, provides views of seven out of eight bordering states on a clear day. It is located in Chattanooga, resting right on the Tennessee-Georgia borderline. It is about 100 miles southeast of Nashville.

Tennessee State Map

Download our FREE Tennessee state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download Map of Tennessee

Activities for Children in Tennessee

Whether you are a homeschooler in Tennessee, or just a family who is planning a trip to the Volunteer State in the near future, you should be aware of some of the educational destinations in the state. Enhance your Tennessee state facts study with these field trip ideas.

  • Discovery Park of America (Union City) – Take a trip to this 100,000 square foot museum with a ton of different exhibits! Some are permanent and others are on a rotating schedule, so make sure to explore the website prior to visiting. This experience focuses around natural science, history, technology, and art.
  • The Hermitage (Nashville) – Andrew Jackson was one of the most famous people to come out of Tennessee. At The Hermitage, you can take a tour of President Jackson’s mansion, led by an experienced tour guide. There are occasionally homeschool days, so keep an eye on the events schedule!
  • Cumberland Caverns (McMinnville) – This caving system is one of the most explored in America! There are daytime and overnight trips, as well as a group discount option. Make sure your homeschoolers are ready to hike – the minimum distance is about a mile and half long.
  • Chattanooga Hop Trolley Tour (Chattanooga) – Historic Chattanooga has so much to see that it can feel overwhelming! The Chattanooga Hop Trolley Tour allows you to take the whole day exploring what this city has to offer. With 8 different stops, a ticket allows you to hop and off the trolley as it takes you to different attractions.
  • East Tennessee Historical Society (Knoxville) – Eastern Tennessee has lots of history behind it, including being the birthplace of the Tennessee Valley Authority. See exhibits that illustrate the content in this Tennessee unit study supplement, such as the story of Tennessee’s nickname of the Volunteer State.

Tennessee Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • World’s Fair Park (Knoxville) – Did you know that the 1982 World’s Fair took place in Knoxville? To remember this event, the land used for the fair was turned into a free park. Take your homeschoolers on a trip up in the Sunsphere to get a breathtaking view of Knoxville and the surrounding Tennessee area!
  • Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park (Limestone) – Famous frontiersman Davy Crockett was born in Tennessee! This state park has a replica of the 18th century cabin that Crockett lived in. There is also a beautiful monument and lots of different natural areas to explore in the park.
  • Lichterman Nature Center (Memphis) – This nature and environmental education center is perfect for homeschoolers who live in the city! There are so many different plants and animals to see; the park is over 65 acres. Admission is normally under $10, but every Tuesday from 1-3pm, the nature center is free.
  • Dunbar Cave State Park (Clarksville) – Earlier in this unit study supplement, it was mentioned that Tennessee land was inhabited over 20,000 years ago. This state park offers proof, with historic cave drawings and useful resources. Admission is free, and offers plenty of supplemental information to learn geography.
  • Tennessee State Museum (Nashville) – There are so many different exhibits to see in The Volunteer State’s capitol! Take a guided tour through the State Capitol building, walk through the Military Museum, or enjoy learning about Tennessee’s interesting history at the state museum. All three museums are free and located in the heart of downtown Nashville!

Tennessee Learning Games for Children

Make sure to check out these available resources to assess your child’s knowledge about Tennessee and learn even more about the Bluegrass State.

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Unit Study Supplement: California Facts, U.S. 31st State https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-california-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-california-facts/#respond Thu, 06 Sep 2018 12:00:21 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=17597 Home to world-famous technology companies, bustling metropolitan areas, movie stars and popular tourist attractions, it’s no wonder that California is a global innovator and trendsetter in a number of fields. Boasting over 1,000 miles of coastline on the pacific, California is the third largest state in the country. In addition to its seashores, the state […]]]>

Home to world-famous technology companies, bustling metropolitan areas, movie stars and popular tourist attractions, it’s no wonder that California is a global innovator and trendsetter in a number of fields.

Boasting over 1,000 miles of coastline on the pacific, California is the third largest state in the country. In addition to its seashores, the state is also home to a diverse geography that includes forests, deserts, farms, and snow-capped mountains.

This unit study supplement will teach your child facts about the history and geography of the Golden State. Learn more about California’s rich history, diverse physical features, and more in our series of unit study supplements covering multiple state facts. You’ll also find field trip ideas in the state, including freebies that your family can take advantage of, whether you are a homeschooler in California or visitor.

You can also download our list of PreK-12 interactive lessons that align with your study of interesting facts about California.

California Fast Facts

Became a State September 9, 1850
Order it Joined the Union 31st state
State Capital Sacramento
State Abbreviation CA
Border States
State Flag California State Flag
State Song
  • I Love You, California
State Flower California Poppy
State Nicknames The Golden State
Notable Californians
  • Richard Nixon, 37th president
  • Tom Brady, NFL quarterback
  • Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson, actor
  • Bruce Lee, actor, martial artist
  • Robert Frost, poet
  • Jack London, author
  • Sally Ride, astronaut
  • Julia Child, chef
  • Joe DiMaggio, baseball player

Historical Facts About California

As with many other states, a number of Native American tribes were the first people to call California home thousands of years ago. In 1542, the first Europeans started to arrive. Explorer Sir Francis Drake reached the Golden State in 1579 and claimed the land for England. However, due to its distance from Europe, settlement in the state didn’t begin until several hundred years later.

With the hopes of converting the Native Americans to Catholicism, the Spanish began building missions in California during the 18th century. Totaling 21 missions altogether between 1769 and 1833, the first began in San Diego with the last one located in San Francisco.

In 1821, California became a province of Mexico after the country gained its independence from Spain. Many settlers were against Mexican rule and in 1846, John Fremont led a revolt and declared that California was an independent country which they called the Bear Flag Republic. That same year, the U.S. and Mexico fought in the Mexican-American War. When the war ended in 1848, the state became a territory of the U.S., then two years later, it was admitted as the 31st state.

Around that same time, gold was discovered at Sutter’s Mill about 36 miles northeast of Sacramento. This discovery led to a mass migration of more than 300,000 people between 1848 and 1855.

The name California is believed to come from a mythical island of the same name mentioned in the novel “The Adventures of Esplandian” where Queen Calafia lived. In the book, the island was rich in gold, which, coincidentally, is one of the things California is known for. This, and the expansive fields of yellow (gold) poppies that bloom in the spring, is one of the reasons that California was officially nicknamed the Golden State in 1968.

Learn more historical facts about California with this timeline that highlights important dates as well as interesting facts about the Golden State.

1542

Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo, the first European to visit the state, arrives to the coast of California.

1579

Sir Francis Drake arrives near San Francisco and claims the land for England.

1769

The Spanish build 21 total missions along the coast of California in an effort to convert natives to Catholicism.

1781

The city of Los Angeles is established.

1821

California becomes part of Mexico.

1846

California declares independence from Mexico.

1848

The California Gold Rush begins, drawing 300,000 people to the area.

1849

San Jose is declared the first capital of California.

1850

California becomes the 31st state through the Compromise of 1850 which admitted it into the Union as a free state.

1854

Sacramento becomes the state capital.

1879

Sacramento is named the permanent capital.

1906

A 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck San Francisco on April 18. The death toll is not certain, but reports estimate between 700-3,000.

1928

The St. Francis Dam, near present-day Santa Clarita, collapsed and the resulting flood killed approximately 430 people.

1933

Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge begins.

1937

Golden Gate Bridge opens to traffic.

1955

Disneyland opens in Anaheim in Southern California.

1966

Ronald Reagan was elected governor of California.

1989

An earthquake struck during game three of the World Series in San Francisco. With a magnitude of 6.9, the Loma Prieta earthquake killed 63 people and injured over 3,700.

Bring history and geography to life with Time4Learning’s interactive online social studies curriculum for grades 2-12.

Geographical Facts About California

California is on the west coast of the U.S. It is bordered by Oregon, Nevada, and Arizona. The Golden State ranks first in the U.S. in population with an estimated 39.5 million residents. In area, it ranks third with more than 163,000 square miles. Los Angeles, Spanish for ‘the angels’, is the largest city in the state and the second largest in the country, after New York City. The state is made up of 58 counties.

To help your child become familiar with California, use this printable U.S. map and have him or her try to locate the state. This detailed map of the state will then help your child locate important cities and landmarks, and develop an understanding for its geography.

  • California’s Death Valley located half way southeast of the state, and bordering Nevada is North America’s hottest desert.
  • Both the highest point and lowest point in the contiguous United States are located in California within 100 miles from one another. Mount Whitney at 14,505 ft above sea level and Badwater Basin in Death Valley at 282 ft below sea level.
  • The highest point, Mount Whitney is located in the eastern central portion of the state within the Sierra Nevada mountain range.
    Sequoia National Park (90 miles west of Death Valley), is home to the world’s biggest tree. A giant sequoia tree bigger than a basketball court and believed to be over 2,700 years old.
  • The San Andreas Fault, a crack in the Earth’s crust, extends approximately 750 miles through California from northwest to mid southwest to the Mexican border.
  • California is located within the Ring of Fire, a 25,000 mile area that includes over 450 volcanoes, and is known for its active seismic activity. The Ring of Fire runs along South America’s west coast near Chile in a u-shaped pattern up through North America, along Japan and the Philippines, then down near New Zealand.
  • The Mojave Desert on the southeastern part of the state, is the driest and smallest desert in North America. It receives less than two inches of rain a year, and covers 50,000 square miles.
  • Mount Shasta is a volcano located in north-central California. It last erupted in 1786.
  • Los Angeles, the cradle of the film industry and the second most populous city in the nation, is located on the southwest coast of the state. It is 220 miles north of the Mexican border.
  • The Sacramento River is the longest within the state. It starts near Mt. Shasta and flows about 400 miles south.
  • Scientists believe that increases in the amount of snowfall in California is tied to the air pollution in China.
  • 80% of the world’s almond production comes from California.

California State Map

Download our FREE California state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Activities for Children in California

Do you homeschool in the state of California? Will you be visiting in the near future? There is a wealth of information that the Golden State has to offer. Students can learn tons of California facts by visiting the state’s seemingly endless attractions, many of which offer free admission. Below are just a few ideas to get you started.

  • La Brea Tar Pits (Los Angeles) – Learn facts about the Ice Age and how many prehistoric animals were so well preserved at this excavation site. Visitors can tour the tar pits and museum to view fossils of animals found at the site like the saber-toothed cat, mammoths, and more. Homeschool days are available throughout the year for families.
  • Alcatraz Island (San Francisco) – After taking a 15-minute ferry ride on San Francisco Bay, visitors will arrive on ‘the rock’, which was home to a federal prison for 29 years. Families can take a self-guided audio tour around the prison and visit the main cellhouse, dining hall, and more.
  • Monterey Bay Aquarium (Monterey) – Located in historic Cannery Row, this nonprofit aquarium first opened in 1984. It’s home to roughly 35,000 animals and exhibits include Tentacles, Kelp Forest, Open Sea, and more. The museum offers a homeschool program as well as other educational opportunities.
  • San Diego Zoo (San Diego) – Located in Balboa Park, this zoo is home to more than 3,700 animals including giant pandas, koalas, jaguars, giraffes, and more. A number of educational programs, special experiences, and activities are available for visitors.
  • Muir Woods National Monument (Mill Valley) – Walk among giant redwood trees that can grow over 370 feet tall at this park a few miles north of San Francisco. Several education programs and activities are available for students. Families can hike the many trails, take a guided tour, or observe the plants and animals that live here.

California Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Griffith Observatory (Los Angeles) – Located in Southern California, visitors can look up into the skies through telescopes, explore exhibits, learn during live shows at the planetarium, and more. Use of telescopes as well as admission to the observatory and grounds is free. There is a cost to view shows at the planetarium.
  • California State Capitol Museum (Sacramento) – Learn facts about California’s history and the lawmaking process in this historic building that is home to the state’s government. Visitors can take part in guided or self-guided tours, visit the theater to watch interpretive films, and explore the museum’s exhibits.
  • Timken Museum of Art (San Diego) – This museum’s collection covers more than 700 years of history and includes paintings, sculptures, and tapestries. First opened to the public in 1965, visitors can explore by taking guided tours free of charge.
  • Golden Gate Park (San Francisco) – This urban park is made up of over 1,000 acres. It so large, the park is home to museums, a carousel, an aquarium, several playgrounds, and more. Although there is a fee for certain attractions, entry to the park is free. Visitors can enjoy a picnic near one of the many lakes, walk or bike the numerous paths, and check out the buffalo paddock.

California Learning Games for Children

Have your child learn more California facts while practicing their spelling, sentence writing, and more with the fun learning games below. You can test their knowledge of the state or simply give them additional practice to reinforce what they’ve already learned.

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Labor Day Activities for Homeschoolers https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/labor-day-activities-for-homeschoolers/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/labor-day-activities-for-homeschoolers/#respond Thu, 30 Aug 2018 12:00:46 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=17315 The first Monday of September in the United States is dedicated to the celebration of the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made throughout its history. The roots of the commemoration are full of turmoil, however. At the height of the Industrial Revolution of the late 1800s, children as young as six […]]]>

The first Monday of September in the United States is dedicated to the celebration of the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made throughout its history. The roots of the commemoration are full of turmoil, however.

At the height of the Industrial Revolution of the late 1800s, children as young as six years old through old age were working up to 12-hour days in factories. Labor unions began rising up in response to the poor conditions and began organizing strikes and rallies. One of these events in 1894 grew to encompass around 250,000 workers in 25 different states, and riots broke out in many cities with at least a dozen deaths related to the unrest. In response to the turmoil, Congress urged then President, Grover Cleveland, to acquiesce to the unions by passing an act that would make the first Monday of each September officially “Labor Day.”

If you are searching for Labor Day lesson plans or activities to tie into the celebrations this year, look no further than the following educational information for this American holiday.

Labor Day History Timeline

1619

The first workers’ strike recorded in American history was organized and staged by Polish workers in Jamestown.

1882

A General Assembly of the Knights of Labor convened in New York City in September and held a public parade of various labor organizations.

1887

Oregon became the first state in the Union to make Labor Day an official public holiday.

1890

The carpenter’s union, led by Peter McGuire, initiated a strike that led to an 8-hour work day for up to 28,000 workers.

1894

Grover Cleveland signed an act establishing Labor Day as a federal holiday.

1912

A bill was enacted that created the United States Department of Labor.

1938

The Fair Labor Standards Act established the first minimum wage laws and 40-hour work weeks.

1963

The Equal Pay Act effectively banned wage discrimination based on gender.

1964

The Civil Rights Act banned worker discrimination based on race.

Why Highlight Labor Day for Kids?

Almost every homeschooler you are teaching right now will one day be a part of the workforce. Knowing the history of working conditions in America will heighten your student’s appreciation for the opportunities he or she has today. Understanding more about workers’ rights, child labor, labor unions, and workers strikes can open students’ eyes to the fact that Labor Day is about much more than parades, picnics, and the beginning of the new school year.

Labor Day Printable

Time4Learning members, make your holiday celebrations even more educational and meaningful with this free Labor Day printable for children in all grade levels.

Download

Labor Day Activities for Kids: Ideas by Grade Level

To aid you in your studies, Time4Learning has pulled together some Labor Day learning activities by grade level. Browse the lists below for inspiration on ways to bring your homeschooler’s attention to this important holiday and thereby grow their civic knowledge as an American.

Labor Day Activities for Preschool and Kindergarten

  • Whenever you encounter a worker (mail carrier, doctor, retail worker, etc.), ask your young homeschooler what they think that person’s job responsibilities might include. Could they draw a picture of that person doing a specific task?
  • A gentle way to introduce some jobs and workers to your preschooler is with this fun Sesame Street video.
  • Will you be attending a Labor Day parade in your town? Ahead of time, have your preschooler or kindergartener help you attach red, white, and blue ribbons to a large ruler or stick. Waving it throughout the parade will make them feel like part of the action.

Labor Day Activities for Elementary Students

  • There are many emerging readers and short chapter books with the labor movement as the central theme. Head to the library or bookstore and look for titles like Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type, Mother Jones: One Woman’s Fight for Labor, and Kid Blink Beats the World to incorporate into your reading list.
  • Have your student think of some jobs in the community that help others, such as law enforcement, firefighters, social service workers, and postal employees. Have them pick one of these, then use the week ahead of Labor Day to write thank you notes to the workers.
  • How many interesting facts can your elementary learner research and discover about women who worked in factories during World War 2? Have them turn their findings into a slideshow or poster.

Labor Day Activities for Middle School Students

  • Head to the library and have your homeschooler check out at least one book on a career they might be interested in pursuing. As they read, discuss with them the job opportunities available in their field of interest.
  • Have your student practice spelling, writing, and vocabulary mastery with these interactive Labor Day word games.
  • Do you have a friend or family member who is a member of a labor union? Have your middle schooler interview that person and specifically ask them what the Labor Day holiday means to them.

Labor Day Activities for High School Students

  • Your high schooler will enjoy getting the full story of the unfolding of the holiday by watching The History of Labor Day, a video from the History Channel.
  • César Chávez, one of the labor leaders of the 20th century, is the perfect subject for a high school research paper. Make sure your high schooler has a firm grasp of the skills for essay writing before writing, though!
  • A great way to combine a study of the job market with a math lesson is to ask your high schooler to try to prepare a budget. Have him/her research the expected earnings of a career they are interested in, then follow up with research on common costs for housing, utilities, transportation, and food to see what their actual earnings might be.

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Unit Study Supplement: John F. Kennedy, U.S. 35th President https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-john-f-kennedy/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-john-f-kennedy/#respond Thu, 16 Aug 2018 12:00:46 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=15469 Although President John F. Kennedy’s life was tragically cut short, he is one of the most remembered presidents in U.S. history. His young family and charisma were well liked by the public, and his years in office were marked by a combination of both success and failure. Usually referred to as JFK, and known to […]]]>

Although President John F. Kennedy’s life was tragically cut short, he is one of the most remembered presidents in U.S. history. His young family and charisma were well liked by the public, and his years in office were marked by a combination of both success and failure.

Usually referred to as JFK, and known to his family as Jack, Kennedy came from a wealthy, prominent political family with many of his relatives holding various offices. As a child, it was expected that John F. Kennedy’s brother Joseph Jr. would be president. However, when Joseph Jr. died during World War 2, John’s father turned to John as the next president, helping him get elected to the U.S. Congress.

After being a congressman and U.S. Senator, he ran against Richard Nixon and won the presidency. As a president, he was best known for his accomplishments during the Cold War. Today, we’ll be exploring some John F. Kennedy facts about his presidency and life.

John F. Kennedy Fast Facts

Presidential Order 35th president
Political Party Democratic
Born May 29, 1917
Death November 22, 1963
State of Birth Massachusetts
Name of Spouse Jacqueline Lee Bouvier
Served as President 1961-1963
Age When Elected to Office 43 years old
Vice Presidents Lyndon B. Johnson

And so, my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.

John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy Timeline

1917

Born on May 29 in Brookline, Massachusetts.

1940

Graduated from Harvard University with a degree in International Affairs.

1941

Joined the U.S. Naval Reserve.

1943

  • March — Took control of PT boat during World War II and sails from San Francisco to the Solomon Islands.
  • August — PT boat collided with Japanese destroyer 5 months later, killing two men and severely injuring the rest, including Kennedy.

1944

Kennedy’s brother, Joseph, is killed during World War II.

1946

Elected to the House of Representatives (Massachusetts).

1952

Kennedy was elected to the U.S. Senate.

1953

Married Jacqueline Lee Bouvier.

1957

Daughter Caroline was born.

1960

  • Announced plans to run for president
  • Son John Jr. was born.

1961

  • Sworn in as 35th President of the U.S. making him the youngest elected president.
  • An attempt to overthrow Cuban dictator Fidel Castro during the Bay of Pigs invasion fails. Kennedy had to negotiate the release of over 1,100 invading exiles. Several hundred were killed by the Cuban government.

1962

After discovering that the Soviet Union was building and storing missiles in Cuba, Kennedy initiated a blockade of the island to prevent further missiles from being delivered. After a tense 13 days, the Soviet Union agreed to remove the missiles if the U.S. agreed not to invade Cuba again. This event came to be known as the Cuban Missile Crisis.

1963

Assassinated at the age of 46 in Dallas, Texas.

Interesting Facts About John F. Kennedy

  • While learning about John F. Kennedy’s accomplishments may be interesting, homeschoolers may also enjoy discovering the lesser known facts about the 35th President of the United States.
  • John F. Kennedy’s political party was technically democratic, but by present day’s standards, he would be considered to be a conservative due to his work to lower taxes.
  • Kennedy had eight siblings: Joseph Jr., Rosemary, Kathleen, Eunice, Patricia, Robert, Jean, and Ted.
  • Kennedy received a Purple Heart Medal for wounds received during World War II.
  • He established the Peace Corps in 1961 by executive order.
  • Kennedy’s administration came to be known as the Camelot Era.
  • His book “Profiles in Courage” won a Pulitzer Prize in 1957.
  • Kennedy was the first Roman Catholic President.
  • President John F. Kennedy was the last to wear a top hat at his inauguration, even though he was known to hate hats.
  • After the boat he was assigned to was rammed by the Japanese, Kennedy and the surviving crew members swam to a nearby island in the Solomon Islands. While stranded there for several days, Kennedy wrote an SOS message on a coconut husk which he gave to natives. He kept the husk in the Oval Office and used it as a paperweight during his presidency.
  • The wreckage of the boat, a PT-109, was discovered in 2002 (nearly 60 years later).
  • Kennedy is the second wealthiest president to take office. In fact, he donated his presidential and congressional salary to charity.
  • Kennedy was above average reader. Reportedly, he learned to read about 1,200 words per minute.
  • After his death, many of his proposals were enacted by Congress, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
  • Kennedy is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Hands-On Activities for John F. Kennedy Unit Study

There is a lot to learn about John F. Kennedy, from his many accomplishments to his interesting life story. Since learning is best done with multi-sensory activities, we have come up with some ideas for how to make these John F. Kennedy presidency facts stick, organized by grade level.

Elementary John F. Kennedy Activities

  • John F. Kennedy was in the Navy during World War II, and assigned to a PT-109 boat. Look up images of that boat or similar ones used during World War II. See if your student can replicate the boats using Legos™ or other interactive building toy.
  • John F. Kennedy was running opposed by Richard Nixon in the 1960 election, and John won by a close call. Print out a map of the United States and color in the states based on who voted for which candidate.

Middle School John F. Kennedy Activities

  • John F. Kennedy could read up to 1,200 words per minute! Have your child pick out a favorite book or article, and see how many words per minute they can read.
  • For his efforts and injuries in World War 2, John F. Kennedy was given a purple heart medal. Write a short summary on what a Purple Heart Medal is, and identify one additional person who received it and why they did.

High School John F. Kennedy Activities

  • The Cuban Missile Crisis led to conflict and stress, and John F. Kennedy had to make a decision on how to prevent the development of missiles in Cuba. Write a research paper about John’s decision, and why it was or was not a good idea.
  • In 1957, John F. Kennedy won a Pulitzer Prize for his book about U.S. Senators, called “Profiles in Courage.” Read his book and write a short report on what the book is about, and why it is important.

Quick John F. Kennedy Spelling Words

youngest desegregation
wealthiest sophistication
heroism upperclassman
courage gentlemanly
assassination visionary

Additional Learning Links for John F. Kennedy

Want to extend your American presidents unit study even further? The following learning resources offer highlight of the John F. Kennedy presidency facts you’ve learned and give your students the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

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How to Help Struggling Readers This Back to School Season https://www.time4learning.com/blog/afterschoolskill-building/how-to-help-struggling-readers-this-back-to-school-season/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/afterschoolskill-building/how-to-help-struggling-readers-this-back-to-school-season/#respond Thu, 09 Aug 2018 12:00:31 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=16719 Now that the summer has come and gone, many parents are preparing for the new homeschool year. If you noticed your child had troubles with reading last year, now’s the time to have a plan to help your struggling reader. Reading plays a pivotal role in education, and it’s important for students to completely grasp […]]]>

Now that the summer has come and gone, many parents are preparing for the new homeschool year. If you noticed your child had troubles with reading last year, now’s the time to have a plan to help your struggling reader. Reading plays a pivotal role in education, and it’s important for students to completely grasp the topic to ensure success.

Sometimes, parents will observe that their child is struggling with reading. This is not a new problem by any means, but luckily, there are more solutions than ever for teaching struggling readers. Discover more about the difficulties in reading and how to help struggling readers!

What are the difficulties in reading?

Do you know which areas are causing your child reading problems? To understand why students struggle with reading, it is important to first recognize the different components of reading. The National Reading panel says that there are five:

  • Phonemic awareness – the ability to hear and manipulate individual sounds in spoken words
  • Phonics – understanding the relationships between letters and sounds
  • Fluency – the ability to read accurately and quickly
  • Vocabulary – words that are known and recognized
  • Comprehension – the reason for reading; understanding what is being read

In general, these components are learned in sequence; a student who has fluency must have phonemic awareness. The steps to get a student to reading comprehension are seen in a reading pyramid, which outlines these components in more detail.

For children struggling with reading, one or more of these components don’t make sense, and there are a few reasons for this.

  • Learning disability: About one in five children in the United States have a documented learning disability. To determine if this is the cause behind your child’s reading struggles, the best thing is to first talk to his or her teacher. Combining the knowledge of behavior at home and at school may help determine if this is the issue.
    There is also a program called Child Find, which is available to all students for free as a learning disability diagnostic assessment. If this is the case, there are plenty of resources to help your child succeed.
  • Decoding issues: This is when your child has difficulty sounding out words, reads slowly, or does not use expression when reading out loud. Generally, these students get stuck on individual words and can lose sight of the bigger picture of reading. A lot of time and energy is spent focusing on words and children can get frustrated during this process.
  • Comprehension issues: If your child is struggling to remember what a book was about, or just doesn’t seem to be understanding a story, comprehension may be the problem. This can occur even if the student is an expert decoder; comprehension focuses more on understanding and interpreting text. This may occur if a child does not have strong vocabulary skills.
  • Retention issues: Students with retention issues have a strong grasp on decoding and comprehension, but may struggling to remember what he or she has read. This can be observed when asking a child to write a book report; he or she may not be able to summarize it accurately or in great detail.
  • Lack of interest: The final possibility for why your child is struggling with reading is because he or she does not have an interest in it. However, this is probably one of the easier problems to fix; children enjoy reading if it’s done correctly!

How do you encourage your child to read?

Once you have identified the problems causing your child to struggle with reading, it is important to recognize the solutions. In order to most effectively address these problems, we’ve broken solutions down by causes of reading difficulty.
For children with decoding issues:

  • Play with magnetic letters on the fridge and put them in order as you sing the alphabet song!
  • Start writing out notes and letters, and as you’re writing, sound out the letters that are being written.
  • Point out irregular words that don’t follow the normal rules of phonics, such as “said,” “was,” and “are.
  • Find creative ways to represent letters, such as writing them in sand or sidewalk chalk.
  • Use signage (such as stop signs or one-way signs) to make real-world connections to how letters can be used.

For children with comprehension issues:

  • Take notes, outlines, or create word maps or flash cards while you read. Writing down information about the book will help you understand it better.
  • Start small by reading short passages or short stories. Quiz your child and see if he or she can understand that text, and if your student can, then move onto larger pieces.
  • Read with a friend or with a parent. Discuss the book while you’re reading it, especially passages you might be confused on. Try to connect the stories to real life.
  • Predict the ending of the book or story based on what you have understood about the story so far.
  • Choose a story that has been made into a movie. Watch the movie first, then read the book. Discuss how the book and the movie differ.

For children with retention issues:

  • Begin to bookmark the story or book you are reading with different colors. Perhaps a green bookmark indicates a happy moment, whereas a red would mean something negative.
  • Try to build a timeline of the book after reading it, without looking through the book again. This lets children visualize the story and determine if they have left anything out – does the timeline look complete?
  • Have your child read through a book, and ask questions about the book when he or she is done. At first, ask the questions immediately. If your child can answer quickly, start waiting an hour or two to talk about the book.
  • Discuss the book and find out what your child found interesting. Take the time to look up fun facts or answer questions about the topic.
  • Have your child read out loud to someone or something. Studies have shown that reading to a dog drastically improved comprehension and retention, since students remember 90% of what they teach.

For children who are reluctant readers:

  • Get books with graphics or have your child pick out a book he or she finds most interesting. It doesn’t matter if it’s fiction or non-fiction – any reading is good reading!
  • Alternate while reading; your child can read one page, and you can read the next. You can even make it into a game by changing your voices while you read.
  • There are plenty of word and reading games available for students to utilize. This can help your child improve his or her vocabulary with all sorts of fun words.
  • Take weekly field trips to the library.
  • Utilize learning tools like Mad Libs™ or Choose Your Own Adventure™ books.
  • Ensure that your child has a specific time and place to read. This should be a distraction-free environment so he or she can focus and give complete attention to the reading.
  • Make sure that you, as parents, are reading as well. Providing a role model for students to follow is essential to reading success.

Of course, these strategies and tips can be mixed and matched, depending on the needs of your child. The most important thing to do when your child is reading is to be encouraging and supportive. Not everyone learns at the same pace, and that is normal.

Time4Learning’s reading curriculum features best practices for literacy development and reading instruction by interweaving listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Check Our Reading Curriculum!

What about standardized tests?

Testing can be a scary process for some children, especially students who struggle with reading. In fact, a majority of elementary school students score below reading proficiency levels, according to 2015 national reading assessments.

This can be stressful for families, especially if a child suffers from testing anxiety. However, there are a number of tips and strategies to help improve your child’s reading skills test scores. Reading success is just a click away!

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Unit Study Supplement: Missouri Facts, U.S. 24th State https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-missouri-facts-u-s-24th-state/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-missouri-facts-u-s-24th-state/#respond Thu, 09 Aug 2018 11:30:37 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=17069 Nestled between eight states near the geographical center of the U.S., is the state of Missouri. Known for its grassy plains, Ozark Mountains, and towering Gateway Arch, the Show-Me state has quite a lot to show. Missouri is the central meeting place for the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The Missouri River, the largest river in […]]]>

Nestled between eight states near the geographical center of the U.S., is the state of Missouri. Known for its grassy plains, Ozark Mountains, and towering Gateway Arch, the Show-Me state has quite a lot to show.

Missouri is the central meeting place for the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The Missouri River, the largest river in North America, runs west to east from Kansas City to St. Louis, where it converges with the Mississippi River that runs north to south.

If you’re learning about U.S. history and geography, the Time4Learning series of United States unit study supplements will take the guesswork out of what to teach. You’ll find information on the state’s geography, history, as well as discover field trip destinations and educational activities in Missouri.

Also included are learning games that allow you to test your child’s knowledge of Missouri facts. You can also download our list of PreK-12 interactive lessons that align with your study of interesting facts about Missouri.

Missouri Fast Facts

Became a State August 10, 1821
Order it Joined the Union 24th state
State Capital Jefferson City
State Abbreviation MO
Border States
State Flag Missouri Flag
State Song The Missouri Waltz
State Flower White Hawthorn Blossom
State Nickname The Show-Me State
Notable Missourians
  • Maya Angelou, poet
  • Harry S. Truman, 33rd president
  • Mark Twain, author
  • Chuck Berry, singer
  • T.S. Eliot, Nobel Prize-winning poet
  • Edwin Hubble, astronomer
  • Langston Hughes, poet

Historical Facts About Missouri

The history of Missouri begins thousands of years ago when Native American tribes such as Osage, Missouria and the Otoe settled in the region. It was in the late 1600s, when Europeans first arrived in the state.

Missouri became a central hub of trade and transportation. Mining attracted early French settlers to the area and they eventually created the first permanent settlement in the state in the mid-1730s, Ste. Genevieve. In 1764, St. Louis became a fur trading post. Its location and proximity to both the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers made it one of the largest settlements in the state.

In 1803, the United States acquired the state from France as part of the Louisiana Purchase, making Missouri part of the Louisiana Territory. In 1812, the area was renamed the Missouri Territory to avoid confusion with the newly founded state of Louisiana. In 1818, Missouri requested statehood. A few years later, President James Monroe signed the Missouri Compromise, which brought Missouri into the Union as a slave state.

Before the Civil War, Missouri had entered the Union as a slave state. However, during the war, the majority of the state was pro-Union.  Missouri had 109,000 men fighting for the north, while 30,000 fought for the Confederacy. With two opposing sides, there were many conflicts within the state such as the Battle of Wilson’s Creek near Springfield.

Below is a timeline with additional historical facts about Missouri that highlights important dates as well as interesting facts about the Show-Me State.

1682

Robert de la Salle arrived in Missouri and claimed the area for France.

1803

The Louisiana Purchase was signed on April 30, which included Missouri.

1804

The Lewis and Clark Expedition left St. Louis to explore the northwest.

1812

A portion of the Territory of Louisiana became the Territory of Missouri on June 4th.

1818

Missouri requests statehood to Congress.

1820

The Missouri Compromise settled a dispute between slave states and free states. It allowed Missouri to enter the Union as a slave state and Maine as a free state.

1821

Missouri is admitted to the Union as the 24th state on August 10 with St. Charles as the capital.

1826

Jefferson City becomes the capital of Missouri.

1835

Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain), is born in Florida, Missouri on Nov 30th.

1857

The Missouri Compromise was deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court during the Dred Scott v Sandford case.

1860

The Pony Express mail service began its 1,900-mile route in St. Joseph and traveled west all the way to Sacramento, California.

1873

The first public kindergarten in the nation was opened in St. Louis by Susan Elizabeth Blow.

1889

One of the most important astronomers of all time, Edwin Hubble, is born in Marshfield on November 20th.

1896

A tornado struck St. Louis, killing over 250 people and causing millions in damage.

1919

Missouri grants suffrage to women when they became the 11th state to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment.

1928

The first packaged sliced bread was introduced by the Chillicothe Baking Company in Chillicothe, the “home of sliced bread’.

1945

Missouri-born Harry S. Truman became president after the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

1967

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis opened to the public. It is 630 feet tall, making it the tallest man-made national monument in the U.S.

2011

An EF-5 tornado struck the southwest town of Joplin, devastating the area and killing 158 people, injuring over 1,100, and causing over $2 billion in damages. It was the deadliest tornado to strike the U.S. since 1947.

Bring history and geography to life with Time4Learning’s interactive online social studies curriculum for grades 2-12.

Geographical Facts About Missouri

Along with Tennessee, Missouri is bordered by eight states, the most by any state.  Missouri ranks 21st in area with over 69,000 square miles. As far as population is concerned, the mid-western state ranks 18th in the country with approximately 6.1 million people.

Missouri is made up of 114 counties. The largest city is Kansas City, located on the western edge of the state near the border with Kansas.  In 2017, its population was almost 489,000.

Does your homeschooler know where Missouri is? This map of the state will help your child pinpoint important cities and landmarks, and help them become more familiar with the Show-Me State. You can then use this printable U.S. map and have your child try to locate the state.

  • Taum Sauk Mountain, near the southeast portion of the state, is the highest point at 1,772 ft.
  • The central point in Missouri is located 20 miles southwest of Jefferson City.
  • Missouri is located in an area of the U.S. known as Tornado Alley,
  • Also known as ‘the cave state’, Missouri is home to over 6,000 caves.
  • The southeastern corner of the state is called the bootheel because of its shape.
  • The St. Francois Mountain range, part of the Ozark Plateau, is in southeast Missouri.
  • Marvel Cave is one of the largest caves in the state. It is located in the southwest, near Branson.
  • The Bagnell Dam in Miller County near the center of the state impounds the Osage River. The dam is 148-feet tall and 2,543-feet long.

Missouri State Map

Download our FREE Missouri state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Activities for Children in Missouri

If you homeschool in the state of Missouri, there are tons of things for the Show-Me State to show your family. Expand on this Missouri facts unit study by giving your child the opportunity to see many of the state’s museums, parks, and other attractions. Below are a few ideas to get you started.

  • Gateway Arch (St. Louis) – Not for the faint of heart, this 630-foot tall structure will give your child a bird-eye’s view of St. Louis, the Mississippi River and more. Be sure to visit the museum and its six, themed exhibits to learn about the Arch and its history. Although you have to buy tickets to the ride to the top, you can visit the museum free of charge.
  • National WWI Museum and Memorial (Kansas City) – America’s official museum dedicated to WWI, this museum first opened to the public in 1926 as the Liberty Memorial. Visitors can learn the story of the war through two main galleries, theaters, a research center, and more. A number of programs and resources are available for families.
  • Bonne Terre Mine (Bonne Terre) – This national historic site is the world’s largest freshwater dive resort. If you’re the adventurous kind and are certified, you can scuba dive, otherwise, take an underground boat and walking tour to explore the mine out of the water.
  • Old St. Louis County Courthouse (St. Louis) – Part of the Gateway Arch National Park, this historic courthouse has been around since the 19th century. Visitor can explore restored courtrooms and learn about significant moments in St. Louis’ past, as well as important trials that took place at the courthouse.
  • The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures (Kansas City) – Established in 1982, this 33,000-square foot, 38-room museum has a whopping collection of over 300,000 items. It is also home to the world’s largest collection of marbles. Visitors can explore the numerous exhibits through either a self-guided or guided tours.

Missouri  Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Missouri History Museum (St. Louis) – Learn historical facts about the St. Louis area at this free museum. Exhibits vary throughout the year, however, continuing exhibits include Seeking St. Louis and The 1904 World’s Fair.
  • Hallmark Visitors Center (Kansas City) – Learn how the world’s largest greeting cards are brought to life on a self-guided tour. Visitors will find works of art, a collection of Christmas trees, and popular keepsake ornaments. Take a star-shaped bow home as a souvenir after watching the bow machine create is right before your eyes.
  • The Money Museum (Kansas City) – Learn about the economy, the Federal Reserve, and all things money through a number of exhibits and tours.  Visitors can design their own currency and even take home some shredded money as a souvenir.
  • Ha Ha Tonka State Park (Camdenton) – Hike the ruins of a stone castle, walk the trails and boardwalks, or have a picnic in the lake area. This state park also features a natural bridge, sinkholes, and caves.
  • Branson Landing (Branson) – Take a walk on the scenic boardwalk in this popular tourist destination. Don’t miss the daily fountain show complete with music and special effects. Concerts and special events take place year round. Plus there are dozens of options for dining and shopping.

Missouri Learning Games for Children

Use the fun learning games below to teach your child even more Missouri facts. With several games to choose from, students can continue to learn about the Show-Me State while they practice their spelling, unscramble words, and play crossword games.

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Homeschool Budget Hacks for Back-to-School https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-budget-hacks-for-back-to-school/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-budget-hacks-for-back-to-school/#respond Fri, 03 Aug 2018 12:00:33 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=17037 I’m sure there are a few out there, but I’ve yet to meet a family who isn’t homeschooling on a budget. Knowing how much homeschooling costs up front means not being blindsided by unexpected costs that can put a damper on the whole homeschool year. If you’ve been at this homeschooling thing for a little […]]]>

I’m sure there are a few out there, but I’ve yet to meet a family who isn’t homeschooling on a budget. Knowing how much homeschooling costs up front means not being blindsided by unexpected costs that can put a damper on the whole homeschool year.

If you’ve been at this homeschooling thing for a little while, then you already know that the primary source of funds for your educational needs will come from you. Very few states offer funding for homeschooling or offer grants for homeschooling families. And, even if they did, most families wouldn’t be interested because taking that money could potentially lead to giving the government additional oversights into your home education choices.

Instead, families interested in affordable homeschooling need to get resourceful. They need to be aware of the tricks of the trade for everything from low cost homeschool curriculum to where to find the best homeschool prices on equipment and supplies.

Before the new school year kicks off, we’ve put together a list of HOMESCHOOL HACKS that you should be aware of to help you save money and stay within budget. Browse the list below, be sure to pin it to your Pinterest profile, and then share it with any homeschool family you know who could also benefit from saving a buck or two this school year!

Homeschool Budget Hacks for Curriculum

  • Before purchasing any new curriculum, take it for a test drive. For online curriculum, be sure to explore lesson demos, and for hard copy curriculum, ask the company to send you pdf samples of lessons and materials.
  • Even if your local homeschool group doesn’t have a curriculum lending library or dedicated swap event, experienced homeschooling families in your area can still be the best source for used curriculum. Start a Buy/Trade thread on your favorite homeschool community group network or simply post a list of what you are looking for. Chances are, someone in your group has used it and is ready to pass it along.
  • One of the absolute best venues for buying new curriculum is at a state homeschool conference. Vendors are eager to have homeschoolers try their wares and often offer discounts and/or free trials during these events. Just be careful not to splurge on something that you haven’t researched carefully. Even deeply-discounted curriculum is a waste of money if you never end up using it.
  • You use online coupon codes for clothing, household goods, and toys, so why not for homeschool curriculum? Before signing on the dotted line for your next curriculum do an internet search for the name of the curriculum + “coupon” to see what you turn up.
  • It’s true that there is no “wrong question,” and especially so when it comes to curriculum buying. Don’t hesitate to ask if the curriculum company you are interested in offers multi-children, military, or bundled discounts.
  • The right combination of affordability, flexibility, and ease of use in an online curriculum can save you money every year. Time4Learning’s homeschooling program provides the right mix of quality and affordability you need.

Homeschool Budget Hacks for Books

  • Certainly, you are aware of your local library, but when it comes to books, don’t miss out on some potential extra “perks” of your library card. Many libraries offer digital subscriptions to audio-books and eBooks which you can download to your favorite mobile device. And before you give up on locating that “hard-to-find” title, check to see if it might be available via inter-library loan.
  • Speaking of the library, make a point of finding out if yours does a yearly (or more often) book sale. These are an excellent way of scoring great books on a multitude of subjects for pennies on the dollar.
  • A library sale isn’t the only place to get books on the cheap, though. Thrift stores, yard sales, and estate sales are a fun way to treasure hunt for titles that will enrich your homeschool library.
  • When it comes to the classics, you won’t need to head farther than your computer or device to consume almost any classic lit. Just pick up a classic literature reading list and you’ll be pleasantly surprised to find that almost any title is available for free online.
  • Are you homeschooling a child with special needs? The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped offers free talking books to people who are eligible. That includes students who are visually impaired, have physical difficulty holding books, or who have a diagnosed reading disability.

Homeschool Budget Hacks for Field Trips

  • One of the key perks of schooling from home is being able to take frequent homeschool field trips that enhance what you are learning about. One thing you may not realize is that many of the popular kid-friendly destinations have started to offer “homeschool days” that include not only educational activities but discounted homeschool prices.
  • If you belong to a homeschool support network, or have a large set of homeschooling friends in your area, you may be able to take advantage of reduced rates by scheduling field trips as a group.
  • One of the chief expenses of visits to museums, galleries, and parks is the food. To save a bundle when day-tripping, pack up any food or drinks you’ll consume in a large cooler. Don’t forget to stick a few snacks in your backpack for when your student gets the “munchies” between meals, too.
  • Sometimes you want to get out and get hands-on with your learning, but there is simply no money in your budget for it. To prepare for these times, make a list of all the free field trip options within driving distance. Also, don’t forget to note attractions that offer weekly, monthly, or yearly “free entry” days as well.
  • Never underestimate the fun of a virtual field trip. To break up your routine, take a day to visit places you can get to with no money and just a mouse-click, such as the Plimouth Plantation, the world’s largest cave, or the length of the US/Mexico border.

Homeschool Budget Hacks for Extracurriculars

  • When exploring homeschool curriculum options, pay attention to the fine print. Some companies offer extra education resources either as bonus material or at a discount just for being a member.
  • Now that homeschooling is such a mainstream educational option, businesses and individuals that offer art, music, and drama are definitely paying attention. Many of these target homeschoolers with low-price classes, especially since homeschoolers can often sign up for times when traditional schoolers can’t.
  • Does your local area have a large population of homeschoolers? Then don’t be surprised if they also have organized extracurriculars available too, such as athletics, band, chess, or fine arts.
  • Be careful not to define “extracurricular” too narrowly. Community service is a type of non-academic activity that is not only completely free but can enhance a student’s transcript. It’s also an undertaking that whole families can often participate in together.
  • If you haven’t heard of 4H clubs, it’s time to do some research. 4H is a global network of youth organizations with a goal of developing citizenship, leadership, responsibility and life skills of youth through experiential learning programs. 4H offers a wide range of extracurricular learning opportunities in subjects such as agriculture, photography, animal care, and handicrafts.

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South Carolina Field Trips for Homeschoolers https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/south-carolina-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/south-carolina-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/#respond Thu, 02 Aug 2018 12:00:51 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=17067 There are so many educational places to visit in South Carolina that families may be overwhelmed with all their options.  Thanks to its early settlement, homeschoolers will find it easy to tie their history curriculum to numerous places where significant events in America’s story played out. The Palmetto State is also full of natural and […]]]>

There are so many educational places to visit in South Carolina that families may be overwhelmed with all their options.  Thanks to its early settlement, homeschoolers will find it easy to tie their history curriculum to numerous places where significant events in America’s story played out. The Palmetto State is also full of natural and cultural destinations that will keep all family members excited about day trips in South Carolina.

Plan out each of your learning adventures on this printable map of South Carolina from Time4Learning.  Plus, as a bonus, we’ve even included a free download of Time4Learning lesson plans that might be the perfect supplement for each trip [at end of article]!

Home education is not the same in every state. Make sure you’re getting the information you need to start homeschooling in the Palmetto State.

Homeschool in SC Now!

Homeschool Field Trips in the Upstate

SC Field Trips Upstate
  • Children’s Museum of the Upstate, Greenville/Spartanburg – Two different upstate locations offer dedicated places for children to explore, imagine, and get hands-on with their learning. Between the two, homeschoolers can interact with many STEAM-related exhibits. Ongoing dedicated programs for homeschoolers are available for ages 4-12.
  • Rose Hill Plantation State Historic Site, Union – After the election of President Abraham Lincoln, a pivotal moment in U.S. history occurred when the governor of SC, William Henry Gist, made the decision to secede from the Union. Visitors can learn about this period in history by touring the plantation owned by the “Secession Governor.”
  • South Carolina Botanical Garden, Clemson – On the campus of Clemson University is a 295-acre garden, a nature-based sculpture collection, historic home and cabin, and geology museum. On the last Wednesday of each month, homeschoolers five and up can participate in hands-on learning experiences. A 4-H Junior Naturalists club also meets at the garden.
  • Split Creek Farm, Anderson – Some South Carolina day trips are completely unique – – like learning about dairy goats! If you schedule a tour of Split Creek Farm, you can learn about different breeds of dairy goats, how herding dogs keep things orderly, take a tour of the milking parlor, and even get to taste-test some of the things that are made from the farm’s goat milk supply. Don’t forget this is a true working farm – – wear clothing that you don’t mind getting dirty.
  • Walhalla State Fish Hatchery, Mountain Rest – A visit to a hatchery could be a great tie-in for lessons on the food supply, food webs, aquatics species or even conservation. The Walhalla hatchery is the only one in the state dedicated to trout – – a coldwater fish common in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The Chattooga Picnic Area is adjacent to the site.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Midlands

SC field trips midlands
  • Andrew Jackson State Park, Lancaster – Combine history, art, and the great outdoors and you have an educational field trip opportunity for learning about Andrew Jackson, the 7th U.S. president. The museum details the boyhood of Jackson, and students will also enjoy exploring the replica of an 18th-century one-room schoolhouse. A campground, hiking trails, fishing pond, and other natural features are ready to be explored here, as well.
  • Camden Battlefield & Longleaf Pine Preserve, Camden – In 1780, the city of Camden was strategic for both British and American forces during the Revolutionary War. The Battle of Camden was a major British victory in the campaign which strengthened the hold of the British over the Carolinas. Admission to the battlefield is free, but you may want to combine it with a visit to other historic sites around Camden, of which there are many.
  • DuPont Planetarium, Aiken – Enhance your science homeschool curriculum with a study of astronomy and the changing night sky. The brand new Digistar 6 Planetarium System is a technologically advanced way to view shows such as “Two Small Pieces of Glass,” an exploration of the use of telescopes over the past 200 years.
  • Riverbanks Zoo, Columbia – The animal lover at your house would probably get excited about day trips in South Carolina that include feeding an elephant or touching a tortoise! The behind-the-scenes tours at Riverbanks would be an amazing educational experience for him or her! But even a general tour of this extensive zoo will teach students about more than 2,000 fascinating animals.
  • South Carolina Railroad Museum, Winnsboro – Step back into a way of life where railroad freight and passenger travel were the primary means of transporting goods and people from one place to another. Walk through a display train that features a business car, a Southern Post office car, and a Nickle Plate caboose. Not only can you tour the museum, but 10-mile round trip train rides are available as well!

Homeschool Field Trips in the Pee Dee

SC field trips pee dee
  • Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge, McBee – When you next study birds in your homeschool, you’ll want to plan a trip to one of the premier birding locations in the state. The refuge is home to nearly 200 species of birds, including water birds, raptors, and songbirds. Don’t forget your binoculars!
  • Franklin G. Burroughs-Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum, Myrtle Beach – When you think of homeschool field trip ideas at the beach, an art museum might not be your first thought, but don’t miss out on this completely free cultural treasure that offers 11 galleries of constantly changing artwork. Field trips activities to complete before and after your visit are included on the website.
  • Hopsewee Plantation, Georgetown – This historic site was home to one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Lynch, Jr. It was built at least 40 years before the Revolutionary War and was a major rice plantation in the South. Topics that homeschoolers can learn about here include rice agriculture, slavery, and the American Revolution.
  • Horry County Museum and L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway – Looking for fun, educational field trips in South Carolina that won’t break the bank? A visit to this destination is completely free and filled with learning opportunities on topics like the history of farming, textiles, industry, wildlife, and more.
  • ScienceSouth, Florence –  Some field trips in South Carolina seem to be custom-made for homeschoolers. That’s true of this educational organization dedicated to all things “science.” ScienceSouth has an entire Homeschool Science Academy for grades K-8 on the mornings of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Fridays of each month. Lab science courses are also available at the high school level.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Low Country

SC field trips low country
  • Bee City Zoo, Cottageville –  With all the “buzz” about the declining honeybee population, your homeschoolers can learn about this subject up close and personal. But this destination is much more than a bee farm; students can also interact with animals such as lemurs, monkeys, alpacas, turkeys, and traditional farm animals. The site also has one of the most extensive reptile centers in South Carolina.
  • Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet – Don’t let the name “Gardens” fool you – – there is way more than just flora and fauna to explore here. The thousands of acres of Brookgreen’s Lowcountry History and Wildlife Preserve are able to be explored, as well, by foot or by boat tour. Learn about the historic rice fields that are now home to alligators, osprey, and waterfowl.
  • Frances Beidler Forest, Harleysville –  The largest remaining stand of virgin, old-growth bald cypress and tupelo gum trees in the world is located right here at this Audubon site. The sanctuary is located within Four Holes Swamp, so a visit could tie in with studies of swamps, conservation, and wildlife.
  • North Charleston & American LaFrance Fire Museum, North Charleston – Fun field trips can sometimes even give you insight into career options, like what firefighters do on a daily basis. In addition, you can learn about the history of firefighting, and learn about fire safety. Your visit will include interactive exhibits featuring real smoke, hands-on displays, a 40-person theater, children’s play area and fire truck simulator.
  • Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum, Mount Pleasant – Three different museum ships are included in an educational trip to Patriots Point. If possible, try to connect your visit to one of the scheduled learning programs, but even if you are just doing a self-guided tour, your homeschoolers will learn much about history, science, aviation, marine science and the military.

For additional South Carolina field trips ideas, visit A2ZHomeschool’s South Carolina Field Trips page. Do you have any additional South Carolina field trips we didn’t mention here? Add them in the comments or share them on our South Carolina Homeschool Support forum!

SC Field Trips Unit Study Suppl.

Is there anything more fun than learning through field trips? To make your experiences at these destinations even more meaningful, Time4Learning members will appreciate this download of free activity tie-ins.

Download

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