Time4Learning https://www.time4learning.com Homeschool, Afterschool, Skill Building Thu, 10 Jan 2019 17:59:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Are You Re-Evaluating Your Homeschool Year? https://www.time4learning.com/blog/experienced-homeschooler/are-you-re-evaluating-your-homeschool-year/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/experienced-homeschooler/are-you-re-evaluating-your-homeschool-year/#respond Thu, 10 Jan 2019 13:00:39 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=20392 With the second half of the school year upon us, many families take this time to check in with their children to see how things are faring. And when you’ve been homeschooling for a few years, you have a pretty good idea of what works for your family and what you can do without. But […]]]>

With the second half of the school year upon us, many families take this time to check in with their children to see how things are faring. And when you’ve been homeschooling for a few years, you have a pretty good idea of what works for your family and what you can do without. But if you’re starting to sense that enthusiasm is starting to wane or smiles are starting to perform disappearing acts, it may be time to take a step back and re-examine some, if not all, aspects of your homeschool. And even if everything is peachy-keen and you live by the motto “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”, it’s always a good idea to re-evaluate your homeschool to see if there is room for improvement.

First, start off by having an open discussion with the entire family to get their general thoughts on how everything is going. Find out what their likes and dislikes are, and what they would like to change. Make sure to ask open-ended questions to really allow everyone to be honest and detailed in their answer. This will give you a good idea of what, if anything, may need to be tweaked.

Otherwise, you can consider the areas below to determine if any adjustments need to be made.

  1. Schedule – Are your children thriving and doing their best work with your current learning hours? Changing up your schedule can include everything from working in the afternoon instead of the morning, or even change the order and/or days you teach certain subjects. For example, rather than doing social studies twice a week, your students might be more receptive and retain more information if you added an extra day or two.
  2. Curriculum – Luckily, as a homeschooler, you can make a curriculum switch any time, unlike students in traditional schools who use the same curriculum for the entire year. If you have more than one child, remember that one program may not work for all of them. Also, keep in mind that one curriculum may work best with one subject but not another. Perhaps learning math is more effective using an online program, while reading and writing work best on a workbook or textbook.
  3. Learning Area – Some students are most productive when they have a designated area for learning complete with a laptop, supplies, and a comfy chair and desk. Others, however, prefer to learn on the couch, outside on a lounge chair, or right on the dining room table. Every student has their unique preferences, and as long as they are learning in a zone free of distractions, there’s no need for concern. But if you start to notice that your child’s concentration is focused elsewhere, like what’s going on outside the front window or the pile of mail across the table, then it may be time to find some new real estate.
  4. Progress – Progress comes in many forms. For any student, academic progress is of the utmost importance. As a homeschooler, this is probably something you already keep track of. Refer back to their records and make note of where they are thriving, and where they may be struggling or even regressing. But you should also evaluate their growth in other areas. How does your child fare in social settings? Does he or she work well with others and cooperate when working in groups? Being able to hone in on these skills now, helps children grow up to be productive members of a team that know how to successfully work with people from different backgrounds and personality types.
  5. Goals – If you created a list of goals at the beginning of the year, check in and see how they are coming along. Should they be modified in some way? Which ones have been accomplished? Depending on where things stand, it may help to create new goals for the next few months.

Lastly, how are you feeling? Are there too many days when you are feeling overwhelmed? Then something definitely needs to change. Maybe you’re taking on too much. Perhaps you can benefit from joining a homeschool group of co-op where your students can take classes outside the house and you can spend time with other homeschooling parents.

When was the last time you pampered yourself? Has it been too long since you got together with your friends, got a haircut or just had some time alone? If it has, then ask a close relative or babysitter to watch the kids. You’ll be amazed at what an hour of doing what you want will cleanse your mind and give you a fresh perspective.

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Unit Study Supplement: Utah Facts, U.S. 45th State https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-utah-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-utah-facts/#respond Thu, 03 Jan 2019 13:00:05 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=20225 A theory that is largely accepted as a fact about Utah, is that its name is derived from the Native American tribe “Ute” which could mean “they who are higher up” or “people of the mountains”. However, the origin and etymology of the name Utah is unclear. Widely known as having the best snow on […]]]>

A theory that is largely accepted as a fact about Utah, is that its name is derived from the Native American tribe “Ute” which could mean “they who are higher up” or “people of the mountains”. However, the origin and etymology of the name Utah is unclear.

Widely known as having the best snow on Earth, and famous Arches National Park, this unit study supplement will help you navigate through some of the most interesting Utah facts for kids! Make sure to stay tuned to Time4Learning’s series of United States unit study supplements. Your homeschooler can learn about each state with tons of information that includes historical and geographical facts, educational activities, field trip ideas, and more. You can also download our list of PreK-12 interactive lessons that align with your study of Utah facts and history.

Utah Fast Facts

Became a State January 4th, 1896
Order it Joined the Union 45th state
State Capital Salt Lake City
State Abbreviation UT
Border States
State Flag Utah State Flag
State Songs Utah, This is the Place
State Flower Sego Lily
State Nicknames The Beehive State
Notable Utahns
  • David Archuleta- singer, songwriter and actor
  • Julianne Hough- professional dancer, actress and singer
  • The Osmonds- family music group
  • Chrissy Teigen- model and author
  • Brendon Urie- singer and songwriter
  • Wakara- Shoshone leader in the late 1800’s who acted as a diplomat and warrior
  • Butch Cassidy- Outlaw from Circleville
  • Philo T. Farnsworth- The inventor of the television

Historical Facts About Utah

Thousands of years before the arrival of Europeans the Navajo, Shoshone, Goshute, Paiute, Anasazi and Ute peoples inhabited the area. Ancestral pueblo tribes carved their houses into the sides of mountains, lived in teepees, or constructed their houses of straw. The cliff dwellings of the Anasazi can still be seen today.

Juan Antonio de Rivera was the first European to lead an expedition through Utah in 1765. He found the Colorado river and claimed the land for Spain. In 1776, Franciscan priests from Mexico also explored the land looking for a way to California. Between the late 1700s and early 1800s travelers through Utah were mostly fur trappers looking for new hunting grounds. Jim Bridger was one of these men. He was the founder of the Great Salt Lake. Jedediah Smith, another Utah pioneer, traveled through the area and found a pass through the Rocky Mountains. John C. Fremont was another prominent explorer who made detailed maps of the area. These maps greatly helped future settlers.

In 1830, Joseph Smith formed the religious group called the Mormons. The Mormons were persecuted wherever they tried to settle. In 1844, when Joseph Smith was killed by an angry mob in Illinois, the Mormons decided they needed to find a new place to settle. They decided on Utah, since at the time it was so sparsely populated. In 1847, led by Brigham Young, a group of 148 Mormons settled in Utah. The following year 1,650 more Mormons arrived. The settlements grew rapidly forming new towns such as, Ogden, Provo, and Farmington. By 1850 there were more than 11,000 Mormons in Utah. They called their land the State of Deseret.

In 1848, the United States gained control of Utah from Mexico during the Mexican-American war. Over the following years, disagreements between Mormon leaders and the U.S government kept Utah from becoming a state.

In the 1860s, Utah had started to become more connected to the rest of the country. In 1861, the final link of the First Transcontinental Telegraph was connected in Salt Lake City. In 1869, the Transcontinental railroad was also connected in Utah. On January 4th, 1896, Utah finally became a state.

Today, Utah is growing rapidly. The major industries are mining, cattle ranching, salt production, and tourism to its many natural wonders.

The timeline below puts Utah history facts into perspective:

500 B.C

The Anasazi people lived in the region.

1300 A.D

The Anasazi civilization disappears.

1600s

The Native American Ute and Shoshone inhabit Utah.

1765

Juan Antonio de Rivera explores Utah.

1776

Franciscan priest from Mexico venture North looking for a route to California.

1821

Mexico becomes independent from Spain and claims Utah.

1824

Jim Bridger is the first European to find the Great Salt Lake.

1847

The Mormons settle in Utah and found Salt Lake City

1848

Utah becomes part of the United States after the Mexican-American war.

1849

The Mormons name the area the state of Deseret.

1850

The Utah territory is established by U.S Congress.

1861

The First Transcontinental Telegraph is connected in Salt Lake City.

1869

The First Transcontinental Railroad is completed in Utah.

1896

Utah becomes the 45th state.

1919

Zion National Park is established.

2002

The Winter Olympics are held in Salt Lake City.

Bring history and geography to life with Time4Learning’s interactive online social studies curriculum for grades 2-12.

Geographical Facts About Utah

Can your homeschooler locate Utah on this printable U.S. map? The mountainous valleys of Utah are home to pine forests. Not only mountainous, Utah’s biomes also include sand dunes and arid deserts. Utah connects the Rocky Mountains, Great Basin, and Colorado Plateau.

The Eastern half of the state is very arid because Utah is in the rain shadow of California’s Sierra Nevada and the Wasatch Mountains. Utah is home to stunning landscapes, as evidenced by their various National Parks, like Zion and Arches.

One cannot talk about Utah’s geography without mentioning the Great Salt Lake. Coined “America’s Dead Sea”, it is the largest saltwater lake in the Western Hemisphere, even saltier than the ocean.

To enhance your study of Utah’s geography, explore a map of the state, then download our printable Utah map below and mark it up with your child. Here are some Utah geography facts you and your homeschooler may want to note about Utah’s unique features.

  • Known as the “mighty five,” Utah has five National Parks: Zion, Bryce Canyon, Capitol Reef, Arches, and Canyonlands.
  • The Rocky Mountain range encompasses the center and Eastern part of Utah. The annual snowfall in Utah’s section of the Rocky Mountains is 47 inches, making it a popular ski destination.
  • Utah is the 13th largest state by area at 84,899 sq miles.
  • The Great Salt Lake is located in the Northwest section of Utah and has eight official islands. The largest is Fremont Island in the Northeastern part of the lake.
  • The Great Salt Lake has an average depth of 13 feet, and is 34 feet deep at its deepest point.
  • Salt Lake City, the state’s capital is located north-central part of the state. A little over 100 miles south of the border with Idaho.
  • Rainbow Bridge is nature’s abstract sculpture carved of solid sandstone. It is the world’s largest natural rock span. It stands 278 ft wide and 309 ft high. It is located in the South of Utah about 6 miles from the border with Arizona.
  • Utah is made up of 29 counties.

Utah State Map

Download our FREE Utah state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Activities for Children in Utah

Whether you homeschool in the state of Utah, or are just visiting, below is a list of field trip ideas that will bring the facts about Utah to life. You’ll find everything from science museums to outdoor activities in national parks.

  • Bryce Canyon National Park – Majestic and full of activities for nature lovers. Some of these activities include stargazing, hiking, scenic driving and winter sports. The park has exceptional stargazing and you can take a class with a Park Ranger on how to use a telescope to view planets (most commonly Venus and Jupiter). During winter, enjoy snowshoeing and cross country skiing.
  • Zion National Park – See the splendor of narrow canyons that have been whittled away by rivers. During peak season you can catch a free shuttle ride through the main roads of the park. Nearby is Grafton ghost town, which was featured in the movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” The trails vary in intensity, and there are many options depending on your level. In addition to trails, there are many points with observation views. One of these observation points is Canyon Overlook which offers views of the national park’s gorge.
  • Dinosaur Quarry (Jensen) – The Quarry is part of Dinosaur National Monument. This area contains some of the highest concentrations of dinosaur fossils from the Jurassic Period. Observe dinosaur bones that are on display, as well as dinosaur bones that are still being excavated and are exposed in the rock. You are able to touch many of the dinosaur bones.

Utah Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Red Hills Desert Garden (St. George) – Established in 2015, it is Utah’s first desert plant conservation garden. The garden is 5 acres and features 5,000 different water efficient plants. There is a stream through the garden that has native and endangered fish species. The garden also showcases 200 million year old dinosaur tracks that were found onsite.
  • Cox Honeyland (Logan) – See how honey is made with their live beehive and free short tours. The Cox family first opened their beekeeping business in 1929, and the the location is still being run by the 4th generation Cox family.
  • Bank Tour (Layton) – Learn about money, fraud and see an old fashioned vault from 1905. Kids will get a chance to play teller and learn about the drive through system. Check ahead of time, but customarily kids will receive a checkbook and learn about how they are used.
  • Hill Aerospace Museum (Roy) – Marvel at various planes and helicopters. There are over 100 aircraft on display and 1,000’s of aviation artifacts. This location is run by volunteers. If you visit during Veteran’s day you might have the lucky, unforgettable experience of touring with a Veteran who will show you which aircraft they flew.
  • BYU Museum of Paleontology (Provo) – A hit with kids who love science, this museum is full of dinosaur skeletons. There are over 17,000 specimens, ranging from Devonian fish (from 380 million years ago) to Pleistocene mammoths and cave fossils (from 15,000 years ago). The fossils have been collected through decades of excavation work done by Dr. James A. Jensen. The fossils are collected from Utah, Colorado, Montana and Wyoming. Some finds in the museum have yet to be officially named.
  • Wheeler Historic Farm (Murray) – A working farm that lets visitors observe the animals. It is on the National Register of Historical Places, and is one of the last 19th century farms in the Salt Lake Valley. Here kids can learn many pioneer skills, like basket weaving and soap making. When possible, you can even try milking some of their many cows.

Utah Learning Games for Children

Learn even more about the Beehive State and test your child’s knowledge about Utah facts and information with these free learning resources.

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Learn The Difference Between Unschooling and Deschooling https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/learn-the-difference-between-unschooling-and-deschooling/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/learn-the-difference-between-unschooling-and-deschooling/#respond Thu, 27 Dec 2018 13:00:43 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=20246 It’s that time of year! Parents of frustrated children may be looking for alternatives to the traditional schooling system. While doing research, parents may stumble across the world of homeschooling and want to find out more information. The journey of homeschooling can often be a learning curve. Along the way, you may encounter some new […]]]>

It’s that time of year! Parents of frustrated children may be looking for alternatives to the traditional schooling system. While doing research, parents may stumble across the world of homeschooling and want to find out more information.

The journey of homeschooling can often be a learning curve. Along the way, you may encounter some new and sometimes confusing vocabulary words – some of which sound the exact same! The most common confusion comes up when discussing unschooling and deschooling. While similar in sound, these two concepts are different. Read on to learn more!

Deschooling

If you are a parent who is beginning to transition your child from traditional school to homeschooling, deschooling is often the first step. Simply put, “deschooling” is the adjustment period that students go through when leaving the school system to become homeschooled. The traditional school environment is nowhere near the same experience as the homeschooling environment; children need time to decompress and unlearn habits that the rigid school environment has taught them.

During this time of deschooling, children may find it difficult to jump right into your ideal homeschooling schedule. In fact, transitioning from a rigid school day to the freedom of homeschooling is foreign to children, especially if they have been in the school system for a while. The longer that a child has been in school, the more time will be spent in the deschooling transition.

It is completely okay for this process to take some time! Every child is different, and some may take more time than others. During the deschooling process, however, there are still ample opportunities for learning. Take time to learn more about your children, especially academically; what are their interests? What subjects are their favorites? Who was their favorite teacher and why? How do they like to learn? This process can be enhanced by fun trips to the library, exploring the outdoors, or creating art. Finding a homeschool group is also extremely beneficial and can help smooth the transition from school to homeschool.

Unschooling

During the deschooling process, parents may stumble upon various homeschooling methods. One of the most common methods that deschooling can lead to is unschooling.”Unschooling” is a homeschool style that is focused around child-focused learning without a formal structure. In other words, unschooling is natural learning, based on a child’s interests.

The process of deschooling complements the unschooling method well. While a child is decompressing and unlearning the rigid schedule of traditional schooling, new discoveries are often made. Now that there is ample time in your child’s day, he or she may want to explore these newfound interests and discoveries. Overtime, these interests can continue to evolve and lead to more discoveries down the line.

For example, a child may observe you cooking a meal for the family. Say you are boiling a pot of water to cook pasta, and you salt the water for taste. Your child may observe that the salt completely dissolves into the water and may question why. According to the unschooling method, your child should be encouraged to find the answer to his or her question in whatever way works best! This could be accomplished through checking out a book from the library, watching a video, or engaging in an interactive online curriculum, such as Time4Learning. The beauty of unschooling is that it is up to your child to decide! Perhaps the simple observation of salt dissolving into water could turn into a lifelong passion for chemistry.

Of course, unschooling isn’t for everyone. Parents may want to explore other homeschooling methods, while others may have a set plan in mind. The wonderful thing about homeschooling is that there are no wrong decisions, as long as you keep your child involved during the process.

In summary, deschooling is a process that nearly every child – and parent! – will go through when transitioning from school to homeschooling. Unschooling, on the other hand, is a potential path that deschooling may lead you down. Do not be afraid to experiment and try new things with your child! Homeschooling is a learning experience, but it is also a fun one. Time4Learning offers a flexible curriculum for all grade-levels that can start, stop, or pause at any time. We strive to make your transition from school to homeschool as seamless as possible.

Sign up for our newsletter to get regular insights and practical advice about homeschooling, skill-building, and after-school enrichment.

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Unit Study Supplement: Alabama Facts, U.S. 22nd State https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-alabama-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-alabama-facts/#respond Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:00:35 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=20235 Did you know that the first rocket that took humans to the moon was built by workers from Alabama, making Huntsville,AL the rocket capital of the world? Or that the state’s official nut is the pecan? Perhaps, you might find it interesting to know that Alabama is Helen Keller’s birthplace? With Time4Learning’s series of United […]]]>

Did you know that the first rocket that took humans to the moon was built by workers from Alabama, making Huntsville,AL the rocket capital of the world? Or that the state’s official nut is the pecan? Perhaps, you might find it interesting to know that Alabama is Helen Keller’s birthplace?

With Time4Learning’s series of United States unit study supplements you can delve into Alabama facts and information, geography, educational activities, field trip ideas and more. You can also download our list of PreK-12 interactive lessons that align with your study of interesting facts about Alabama.

Became a State December 14th, 1819
Order it Joined the Union 22nd state
State Capital Montgomery
State Abbreviation AL
Border States
State Flag Alabama State Flag
State Song Alabama
State Flower Camellia
State Nickname Yellowhammer State, Heart of Dixie, Cotton State
State Motto “We dare defend our rights.”
Notable Alabamians
  • Rosa Parks- civil rights activist
  • Channing Tatum- actor
  • Mia Hamm- soccer player
  • Lionel Richie- singer
  • Nat “King” Cole – Jazz pianist and vocalist
  • Harper Lee – Author (most notably To Kill a Mockingbird)
  • Coretta Scott King- civil right activist, wife of Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Condoleezza Rice – former United States Secretary of State
  • Debby Ryan- actress from Huntsville

Historical Facts About Alabama

The native tribes of Alabama include the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek and Koasati. In Choctaw “Alabama” means “thicket-clearers” or “vegetation-gatherers.” Alabama was first explored by Europeans from Spain on an expedition by Hernando de Soto in 1540. 160 years later, the French founded a settlement in Old Mobile. Alabama was under French control for 61 years as part of their La Louisiane territory. When the French lost to British forces in the Seven Years’ War Alabama became part of British West Florida.

In 1810 the estimated population was 10,000, but swelled to 300,000 by 1830. By 1860 the population was in the 900,000’s, of which nearly half were enslaved African-Americans. On January 11th, 1861 Alabama seceded from the Union and was an independent republic for a few days before joining the Confederacy. The capital of the confederacy was briefly located in Montgomery, AL. Alabama was heavily involved in the Civil War, although few battles were fought in the state.

Alabama’s enslaved African-Americans were granted freedom by the 13th amendment in 1865, although Alabama wasn’t restored to the Union until 1868. Unfortunately, the struggle for African-Americans did not end with this. In 1901 the Alabama constitution imposed Jim Crow laws which segregated African-Americans. Continued racial segregation, brutality, lynching and agricultural depression inspired many people to migrate out of Alabama. Between 1910 – 1920 the population growth rate dropped by nearly half. At the same time of this great migration, Birmingham Alabama attracted many rural people with industrial jobs. By 1920 Birmingham was the U.S’ 36th largest city.

Today, Alabama is invested in space exploration, education, health care, banking, mineral extraction, steel production and agriculture.

In the timeline below, you can learn more Alabama history facts:

10,000 B.C.

The Russell Cave National Monument has evidence of Native American presence since 10,000 B.C. The cave was a location of shelter, while the nearby forest provided food and resources. The location has been inhabited continuously since that time.

1539-1541

Hernando de Soto explores the Southeast encountering the Native American Chief Tuskaloosa. The largest Native American battle occurs in 1540 between Chief Tuskaloosa’s warriors and deSoto’s troops. Accounts corroborate that Tuskaloosa’s entire village of over 2,000 was destroyed. The location is said to be Mabila or Mauvila, though the exact location has eluded researchers until this day.

1702

Brothers Iberville and Bienville LeMoyne establish a French settlement and fort at Twenty-Seven Mile Bluff.

1720

The capital of French Louisiana is moved from Mobile to Biloxi, then to New Orleans.

1780

Spanish forces capture Mobile during the American Revolution.

1811-1812

Schools are established in Mobile (Washington Academy 1811) and Huntsville (Green Academy 1812).

1813-1814

Native American forces battle Europeans in the Indian Creek War.

1819

Alabama enters the Union as the 22nd state.

1835-1836

Alabama gold rush

1955

Rosa Parks is arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a boarding white passenger.

2004

Condoleezza Rice is appointed U.S Secretary of State.

2005

Hurricane Katrina causes major damage along coastal areas on the Gulf.

Alabama Geography Facts

Can your homeschooler locate Alabama on this printable map of the United States? To enhance your unit study supplement, explore a map of the state, then download our printable Alabama map below and mark it with your child. Here are some facts you and your homeschooler may want to note about Alabama’s geography and unique features.

  • The highest point is Mount Cheaha at 2,413 ft. It is located in the eastern part of the state, between Birmingham and the state’s border with Georgia.
  • Northern Alabama is mountainous with the Tennessee river cutting a large valley. This area is full of creeks, streams, rivers and lakes.
  • To the South, Alabama has 60 miles of coastline sandwiched between Mississippi and Florida.
  • Alabama caves include Cathedral Caverns east of Huntsville, and Shelta Cave west of Montgomery.
  • A 5 mile wide meteorite impact crater (Wetumpka Crater) is located in Elmore County, just north of Montgomery. The meteorite hit about 80 million years ago.
    There are 67 counties in Alabama.
  • The Appalachian Mountains extend from north-central Alabama up into Canada.
  • Major rivers in Alabama include the Alabama, Chattahoochee, Conecuh, Mobile, Tennessee and Tombigbee. The Tombigbee river and Alabama river join together in the Southern part of the state near Mobile to merge with the Gulf of Mexico.

Alabama State Map

Download our FREE Alabama state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Activities for Children in Alabama

Whether you homeschool in the state of Alabama, or are just visiting, below is a list of field trip ideas that will help supplement the Alabama facts unit study. You’ll find everything from historical mining hikes to the largest indoor rock-climbing center in the Eastern U.S.

  • U.S Space and Rocket Center (Huntsville) – Learn about the International Space Station and space shuttles through space travel simulators. There are rocket exhibits, artifacts and historical exhibits on the U.S’ achievements in space exploration. A few engineers from the original Apollo program are present and you can chat with them about their experiences and contributions to the space race.
  • National Memorial for Peace and Justice (Montgomery) – Described by visitors as a sobering experience, this museum documents social injustices that happened, and in some places are still happening in different forms, to African Americans. The museum is dedicated to over 4,000 African Americans who were the victims of lynchings.
  • Battleship USS Alabama (Mobile) – Marvel at the humongous battleship (over 12 decks), submarine and over 25 airplanes. Unique features include a flight simulator, exploring gun turrets and the brig. Several iconic tanks from World War II, Korea and the Vietnam war are in the tanks and artillery exhibit.
  • Noccalula Falls (Gadsden) – The majestics falls are not the only attractions here! Don’t miss the creeks, trails, petting zoo, mini golf and botanical garden. Try riding the train that takes visitors on a tour of the park before heading out to explore on foot. The trails are marked for their elevation change which ranges from moderate to flat.

Alabama Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Cane Creek Nature Preserve (Tuscumbia) – Hike near waterfalls, canyons and old-growth forests. The preserve also includes majestic rock shelters and lookout points.
  • Bartram Canoe Trail (Spanish Fort) – The trail winds through bottomland hardwood forests, cypress swamps, creeks and lakes. You can tackle many trails in one day or have many day trips here.
  • Ruffner Mountain Mining History (Irondale) – Join a guided 3 hour hike through land that was home to the Sloss-Sheffield Mines. On this hike you will get to see mining relics and iron ore crushers. This hike is suitable for children 10 and older due to some slopes and inclines.
  • Birmingham Boulders Indoor Rock Climbing (Birmingham) – The largest rock-climbing facility East of the Mississippi river. There is usually an entrance fee, but select nights are customer appreciation nights and entrance is free.

Alabama Learning Games for Children

Now that you have learned these Alabama facts and history, continue the fun with these free learning resources:

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Unit Study Supplement: North Carolina Facts, U.S. 12th State https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-north-carolina-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-north-carolina-facts/#respond Thu, 20 Dec 2018 13:00:49 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=20005 Resting along the coastline and containing rivers, forests, and mountains, the beautiful state of North Carolina not only offers gorgeous geography but great history as well. As one of the original 13 colonies, North Carolina’s historical legacy is strong; beginning some of the first initial attempts of colonization in the New World and holding stories […]]]>

Resting along the coastline and containing rivers, forests, and mountains, the beautiful state of North Carolina not only offers gorgeous geography but great history as well. As one of the original 13 colonies, North Carolina’s historical legacy is strong; beginning some of the first initial attempts of colonization in the New World and holding stories of pirates, wars, mysteries, and independence. This unit study supplement gives you information regarding North Carolina facts and history, geography, and fun, beautiful destinations to visit within the state.

North Carolina Fast Facts

Became a State November 21, 1789
Order it Joined the Union 12th state
State Capital Raleigh
State Abbreviation NC
Border States
State Flag Flag of North Carolina
State Songs The Old North State
State Flower Flowering Dogwood
State Nicknames
  • Tar Heel State
  • Old North State
Notable North Carolinians
  • O. Henry, Short Story Writer
  • Michael Jordan, Professional NBA Player
  • Dale Earnhardt, Professional Race Car Driver
  • Andrew Jackson, 7th U.S. President
  • James K. Polk, 11th U.S. President
  • Andrew Johnson, 17th U.S. President
  • Clay Aiken, Singer
  • Charlie Rose, Television Journalist
  • Andy Griffith, Actor

Historical Facts About North Carolina

Throughout its history, North Carolina experienced many shifts and changes regarding the inhabitants. The territory is believed to have been inhabited 10,000 years before Europeans arrived in the 1500’s. At this time, many indian tribes were established, including the Chowanoke, Roanoke, Coree, Cape Fear, Waxhaw, and Catawba. Then, upon discovery of the land, Europeans began to trickle in and attempt colonization.

Giovanni da Verrazzano began the exploration of North Carolina by mapping out the coast in 1524. Following him, several other spanish explorers launched expeditions to gather territory or colonize the land. One explorer, Juan Pardo arrived in North Carolina with the intention of claiming territory for Spain. As he traveled through the New World, he established 6 forts, leaving men to watch over each. Fort San Juan was established in modern day Burke County, North Carolina in 1567. Unfortunately, after 18 months, native indians attacked and killed most of the stationed men at Fort San Juan and burned the structure to the ground.

Following Spanish failure, Englishmen began colonization for their country.  In 1584, Queen Elizabeth I granted permission to Sir Walter Raleigh for settlement in present day North Carolina. Raleigh sponsored several expeditions including one by Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe as well as the attempted colonization of Roanoke Island off the coast. The “Lost Colony” of Roanoke leaves a living mystery. When the small colony who had arrived on the Island in 1587 began lacking supplies, they sent their governor, John White, back to England. Leaving his family and colony, White traveled to England to beg for supplies and help. His immediate return to Roanoke was delayed for 3 years due to the Anglo-Spanish War. When he finally arrived back at Roanoke Island in 1590, he found it completely deserted with only one previous sign of them; the word “Croatoan” carved into a wood post. This was the name of a nearby Island and Indian tribe with the same name.

The rocky coasts of North Carolina prevented easy access, thus, the territory became widely populated by Englishmen moving down from Virginia in 1650. These people became the first permanent settlers in North Carolina. Later, King Charles II granted permission for colonization in North America in 1663; this grant led to the general establishment of the “Province of Carolina” borders. Soon, extreme tensions and differences between the North and South of Carolina led to their division in 1712.  Following the separation, North Carolina temporarily became an English Royal Colony.

On April 12, 1776, North Carolina became the first to instruct its delegates to vote for independence against the British. Then, following the American Revolution, North Carolina became the 12th state to ratify the constitution on November 21, 1789.

In 1860, during the Civil War, North Carolina was a slave state. However she refrained seceding from the Union until President Lincoln asked them to attack South Carolina. The command caused their secession on May 20, 1861. Although few battles were fought in the state, they sent more troops to fight for the confederacy than any other confederate state.

1524

Giovanni da Verrazzano maps out the coastline.

1539

Hernando de Soto begins exploring West Central North Carolina in search for gold.

1566

Juan Pardo explores the land.

1567

Juan Pardo establishes Fort San Juan.

1568

Indians destroy Fort San Juan.

1584

  • Queen Elizabeth I grants Sir Walter Raleigh permission for colonization in America.
  • Expedition by Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe.

1587

  • The small colony arrives at Roanoke Island.
  • John White sails for England to gain supplies and help.

1590

White returns to Roanoke Island to find it abandoned.

1650

English people migrated down from Virginia.

1663

  • King Charles II grants Carolina colony to 8 supporters who helped him ascend to the throne.
  • Carolina colony is founded. It was named after Charles I. It included North and South Carolina.

1705

The first town in North Carolina, Bath is founded.

1712

North Carolina and South Carolina divide.

1718

Blackbeard arrives and dies off the coast of North Carolina.

1729

North Carolina becomes a royal English colony after 7 of the 8 proprietors sold their shares to the crown.

1767

Construction of Tryon Palace begins.

1771

Tryon Palace is completed.

1776

Votes for independence.

1788

Raleigh chosen for capital.

1789

Becomes the 12th state.

1836

Construction of the Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad begins.

1861

Seceded from the Union to join the Confederacy

1861

Seceded from the Union to join the Confederacy

1865

Troops surrender

1868

Rejoins the Union

1903

The Wright brothers successfully fly their plane in North Carolina in Kitty Hawk.

1943

UNC becomes the nation’s first four-year college for Native Americans in Pembroke, NC  

Bring history and geography to life with Time4Learning’s interactive online social studies curriculum for grades 2-12.

Geographical Facts About North Carolina

The beautiful destination of North Carolina contains a variety of natural features including rivers, forests, beaches, and mountains. It is ranked as the 28th largest state land wise, and 9th most populous with 100 counties. The geography of North Carolina divides into 3 main sections: the mountainous area in the west, the central Piedmont Plain and the Atlantic Coastal Plains in the east.

Parts of the Appalachian Mountains are located in North Carolina’s mountainous quarter along with other mountains like The Great Smoky Mountains and Blue Ridge Mountains. Central Piedmont Plain is the most populated and urbanized region, including 6 of North Carolina’s highest populated cities. This area also consists of rivers and small, isolated mountains like Pilot Mountain, the Uwharrie Mountains, the Brushy Mountains, and the South Mountains.

Finally, the Atlantic Coastal Plain is the largest part of North Carolina, consuming 45% of the land. In this region, there are barrier islands, rivers, and coastal forests, along with rich soil beneficial for growing tobacco, cotton, soybeans and melons.

  • The first successful flight in history occurred at Kill Devils Hills on the coast of NC, 200 miles east of Raleigh.
  • Raleigh, the state capital is located in the northeast central region of the state.
  • Mount Mitchell, the highest mountain in Eastern North America and of the Appalachian Mountains  is located in North Carolina. The height reaches 6,684 ft.
  • North Carolina is a native home to the Venus Flytrap plant.
  • The first gold nugget discovered in North America was found in Little Meadow Creek,  just northeast of Charlotte,NC.
  • The waters of Cape Hatteras are nicknamed “Graveyard of the Atlantic” in reference to numerous shipwrecks the dangerous waters have caused. The Cape Hatteras is located off the east coast of North Carolina.
  • Forests cover nearly 60% of North Carolina.
  • High Point is the only city in North Carolina that extends into 4 counties.
  • The nickname “Tar Heel State” comes from a time when the state produced high amounts of tar.
  • North Carolina has 18 rivers within its borders including Cape Fear River, Neuse River, Pee Dee River and Catawba River.

North Carolina State Map

Download our FREE North Carolina state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Activities for Children in North Carolina

Whether you are a homeschooler in North Carolina, or just a family who is planning a trip to the Tar Heel State in the near future, you should be aware of some of the educational destinations in the state. Enhance your North Carolina state facts study with these homeschool field trip ideas.

  • The Outer Banks – In addition to the beautiful ocean scenery barrier islands of the Outer Banks provide, the shore also carries historical background as the first place Europeans attempted settlement in North America. On the Outer Banks, you can enjoy the beauty of the islands while reminiscing the history.
  • Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum  – A museum created to honor over 2,000 ships that met their end off the coast of Cape Hatteras. It contains artifacts from destroyed ships and exhibits regarding the Hatteras Islands, Piracy and the Civil War.
  • Battleship North Carolina –  Walk along the deck of a powerful weapon of the sea that was once used in World War II. This hands-on, wondrous historical artifact teaches the ship’s contribution to the war, provides stories of soldiers and allows you to experience roles soldiers carried out during the war.
  • Cape Lookout – Upon your arrival of the island, Cape Lookout calls for adventure and fun times. It offers various activities such as fishing, lighthouse climbing, touring historic villages and camping. The geographical beauty and exciting activities provide a naturally enjoyable destination. Entrance is free, however the ferry ride to reach the island, as well as activities and camping will cost.
  • Wright Brothers Memorial – The first successful flight by the Wright brothers was completed in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Taking advantage of the original location, the Wright Brothers Memorial teaches facts about the pair of brothers while offering numerous exhibits that display the original plane design, daily life of the Wright brothers and more.
  • Old Salem – Old Salem revives the lifestyle of early southerners. On display through historical traditions using reserved objects, buildings and landscapes, accompanied by knowledgeable historians and cultural actors; you are assured an enjoyable visit that will allow you to experience life during this time in history.

For more educational field trip ideas in North Carolina read this post!

North Carolina Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Blue Ridge Parkway – This beautiful national park provides a gorgeous roadway coated with aspects of the breathtaking beauty of nature. Along its path are numerous destinations and activities to enjoy for free such as hiking, fishing, museums, camping, experience a tour for an added fee.
  • Mount Mitchell State Park – As eastern North America’s highest point above sea level, this is another state park laced with history and natural beauty that would provide a wonderful field trip. Discover astonishing views at the highest point of the Appalachian Mountains and it’s cultural history as one of the nation’s first state parks.
  • Fort Raleigh – Serving as England’s first home in the New World, this historical site reserves their first settlements as well as the history of native Americans and more. Additionally, it preserves the memory of the dwellers of Roanoke Island with a live-action play inside the park. The site is free to enter, but additional exhibits inside require payment, including The Lost Colony play and the Elizabethan Gardens.
  • North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences – North Carolina’s most visited museum is an extravagant resource with numerous exhibits and an iconic globe resting on the outside of its building. This museum includes exhibits regarding live animals, dinosaurs, bugs, hidden gems and much more! Inside its walls, you will discover scientific facts of life and opportunities for involvement. General admission is free, though donations are appreciated. The museum also offers homeschool classes monthly from September through May.  The class fee changes per class.
  • The Mint Museum  – North Carolina’s first art museum provides various artistic aspects including paintings, crafts and activities. The museum ties together art from around the world with intentions to preserve and display human creations and inspire creativity in others. The museum is free to visit on Wednesdays from 5-9pm. Come admire artistic outlets of others and welcome creative stimulation in your spirit.
  • The Billy Graham Library – Designed to reflect the life of Billy Graham who was known as “America’s Evangelist”, this library displays the journey of his life and his spiritual influence.

North Carolina Learning Games for Children

Make sure to check out these available resources to assess your child’s knowledge about North Carolina.

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Maryland Field Trips for Homeschoolers https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/maryland-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/maryland-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/#respond Tue, 11 Dec 2018 13:30:54 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=19990 If you’re looking for fun, educational field trips in Maryland, there are tons of options in the state. No matter what region of the state you live in, we have compiled a list of historic sites, museums, parks and more where you can learn about a wide range of topics. Whether you’re looking to learn […]]]>

If you’re looking for fun, educational field trips in Maryland, there are tons of options in the state. No matter what region of the state you live in, we have compiled a list of historic sites, museums, parks and more where you can learn about a wide range of topics. Whether you’re looking to learn about nature and science, uncover the state’s rich and diverse history, or explore its more than 4,000 miles of coastline, you are sure to find a homeschool field trip in Maryland to suit your child’s interests.

Below are several field trip ideas in Maryland sorted by region. We’ve also included a printable map of Maryland to help your child become more familiar with the state’s geography. As a bonus, we’ve added a free download of Time4Learning lesson plans that might be the perfect supplement for each trip [at end of article]!

Home education is not the same in every state. Make sure you’re getting the information you need to start homeschooling in the Old Line State.

Homeschool in MD Now!

Homeschool Field Trips in the Western Region

Homeschool Field Trips in the Maryland Western Region
  • Antietam National Battlefield, Sharpsburg – Families can enhance their history lessons by learn about the bloodiest single-day battle of the Civil War that took place on September 17, 1862. Students can explore the exhibits at the visitor center as well as walk along the battlefield on designated trails, as well as visit the Pry House Field Hospital Museum.
  • Hagerstown Roundhouse Museum, Hagerstown – Learn about local railroad history and explore all the model railroads on display at this museum that also features and outdoor train yard, artifacts, a railroad library, and more. The museum also hosts several special events throughout the year.
  • Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown – With free admission and parking, families can save money as they enrich their arts studies at this museum that was established in 1931. The museum permanent collection features thousands of paintings, drawings, sculptures, and more. A number of young artist programs are available for students.
  • C & O Canal National Historical Park, Hagerstown – This historical park stretches the length of the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal — 184.5-miles! With numerous visitor centers and historic structures along the way, families can learn about how people traveled and made a living for almost 100 years in the area. You can also take in the sights of Great Falls as you hike along the Billy Goat Trail.
  • Crystal Grottoes Caverns, Boonsboro – Take a tour of the only public cave in Maryland that was discovered in 1920. Explore the different rooms and compare the unique formations such as those in the Blanket Room, and learn about the geology and history of the cave.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Capital Region

Homeschool Field Trips in the Maryland Capital Region
  • National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick – Families can learn about the medical techniques that were used during the Civil War at this 7,000-square-foot museum. Five exhibits allow students to learn how the wounded were cared for, the tools and resources used, and more. On display is the only known remaining surgeon’s tent, as well as surgical kits and other items.
  • Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt – NASA’s first space flight center, this facility’s 10,000 employees conduct investigations, build spacecraft, develop and operate of space systems, and more. A visitor center allows families to explore numerous exhibits and take part in educational activities and events such as model rocket launches.
  • Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel – Established in 1936, this 12,841-acre refuge is home to a biological research center that became the first wildlife experiment station in the U.S. Families can explore the visitor center’s exhibits, take part in hands-on nature studies, learn through both indoor and outdoor classes and more.
  • Oxon Hill Children’s Farm, Oxon Hill – Families can explore this living farm museum on a self-guided tour where they’ll see animals, antique farm equipment, and more as they learn about life on a farm. A visitor activity barn features exhibits and activities for students. Plus numerous farm programs allow children to get hands on by milking the cows, feeding chickens, and more.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Central Region

Homeschool Field Trips in the Maryland Central Region
  • National Aquarium, Baltimore – Opened in 1981, this non-profit public aquarium’s mission is “to inspire conservation of the world’s aquatic treasures”. Exhibits include Dolphin Discovery, Living Seashore, Shark Alley, and more. Numerous homeschool programs are available for families and groups.
  • Maryland Science Center, Baltimore – Visitors can enhance their science study at this center that opened in 1976 by exploring dinosaur skeletons, a planetarium, and an observatory. Exhibits include Our Place in Space, Dinosaur Mysteries, Your Body, and Newton’s Alley just to name a few. Numerous homeschool programs are available for families.
  • Fort McHenry National Shrine and Monument, Baltimore – Visitors can explore this star-shaped fort where an American flag inspired Francis Scott Key to write a poem that would become the national anthem of the U.S. Students can take part in ranger-led activities that include flag changes and interpretive programs where they will learn about the Battle of Baltimore, the U.S. flag, and more.
  • Banneker-Douglass Museum, Annapolis – Families can learn about the contributions of African-Americans from the state including Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Thurgood Marshall and more at this former church that was built in 1874. In addition to numerous exhibits, the museum offers guided tours, workshops, and educational programs.
  • Maryland State House, Annapolis – Dating back to 1772, the Maryland State House is the oldest state capital in the U.S. Here, George Washington resigned as commander in chief of the Continental Army in 1783. Visitors can learn about the House’s rich history through informative exhibits, numerous tours, and educational programs.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Southern Region

Homeschool Field Trips in the Maryland Southern Region
  • Calvert Cliffs, Lusby – Families can explore and go fossil hunting at this state park where prehistoric sharks’ teeth and other fossils from the Miocene Era have been identified. Visitors can also hike through the park’s marked nature trails, bird watch, or take in the sights of the huge cliffs along the Chesapeake Bay.
  • Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, St. Leonard – This environment preserve features over 70 archaeological sites dating back thousands of years. Families can explore the visitor center and learn through numerous interactive exhibits on display. Students can also take part in several educational programs and workshops.
  • Historic St. Mary’s City, St. Mary – As Maryland’s first permanent settlement, there is a rich history and a lot for students to learn at this 800-acre living history museum. Homeschoolers can learn what life was like in the 17th century through tours, family programs and more.
  • Historic Sotterley Plantation, Hollywood – Families can step back in time and learn about local history at this 18th century plantation. Students can explore exhibits like an 1830’s slave cabin, a 19th century schoolhouse, and more. Homeschool days, summer programs, and a number tours are available.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Eastern Shore Region

Homeschool Field Trips in the Maryland Eastern Shore Region
  • Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, St. Michaels – This 18-acre museum first opened to the public in 1965 and showcases the rich history of the area with artifacts, exhibits as well as the largest collection of Chesapeake Bay boats. Students can take part in a number of education programs, scavenger hunts, lighthouse overnight adventures, and more.
  • Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, Cambridge – Established as a sanctuary for waterfowl, this 28,000-acre refuge is home to more than 250 bird species including bald eagles and Canadian geese, as well as reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. Children can take part in educational programs including guided tours, habitat explorations, and more.
  • Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, Church Creek – Homeschoolers can learn about this heroic figure who helped free hundreds of slaves. The visitor center features exhibits, interpretive programs, and more. Twenty minutes away, families can also check out the Harriet Tubman Museum and Educational Center to view more exhibits and a short film free of charge.
  • Fair Hill Nature and Environmental Center, Elkton – Be one with nature and take part in the numerous outdoor environmental programs available for students. The center’s vision is to “educate and inspire current and future generations to explore, respect and protect nature”. Families can learn through nature tours, summer camps, and other events throughout the year.

MD Field Trips Unit Study Suppl.

Is there anything more fun than learning through field trips? To make your experiences at these destinations even more meaningful, Time4Learning members will appreciate this download of free activity tie-ins.

Download

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Oregon Field Trips for Homeschoolers https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/oregon-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/oregon-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/#respond Tue, 11 Dec 2018 13:00:22 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=19699 As the ninth largest state in the U.S., there is no shortage of fun things to do in Oregon with your homeschoolers! Families looking for educational field trips in Oregon can take advantage of all the destinations available to explore and learn from. Whether your child is interested in Earth and space, learning about art […]]]>

As the ninth largest state in the U.S., there is no shortage of fun things to do in Oregon with your homeschoolers! Families looking for educational field trips in Oregon can take advantage of all the destinations available to explore and learn from. Whether your child is interested in Earth and space, learning about art and history, or curious about plants and animals, you are sure to find an Oregon field trip to satisfy their thirst for knowledge.

To start planning your fun field trips, use this printable map of Oregon. You’ll also find free Time4Learning lesson plans that you can download at the end of this post to help supplement your homeschool field trips in Oregon.

Home education is not the same in every state. Make sure you’re getting the information you need to start homeschooling in the Beaver State.

Homeschool in OR Now!

Homeschool Field Trips in Central Oregon

Homeschool Field Trips in Central Oregon
  • Tumalo Falls, Bend – This impressive, 97-foot waterfall is part of the Deschutes National Forest and is a perfect destination for students learning about Earth’s features. Visitors can explore the day use area that offers picnic sites as well as numerous hiking and biking trails.
  • Oregon Observatory, SunriverLearn about Earth and space science at this observatory that gives you access to over 10 telescopes to explore and learn about the stars, planets, galaxies and more. Visitors can take part in both day and night viewing, and also register for kids and family classes. The educational value of participating in the viewing is priceless and can help bring their learning to life.
  • High Desert Museum, Bend – Opened in 1982, this 100,000-square foot museum aims to teach visitors about the high desert environment, the animals that call it home, and the area’s cultural heritage. Students can learn about both science and history by taking part in numerous events and activities as well as through engaging indoor and outdoor exhibits.
  • Lava River Cave, Bend – Visitors can either explore this lava tube on their own or join a guided tour to learn about this cave that was formed 80,000 years ago by a volcanic eruption. At a length of 5,211 feet, this is the longest continuous lava tube in the state. Families can check out the visitor center for more about this cave’s history and geology.
  • Painted Hills, Mitchell – Enhance your geography curriculum with this unusual display of natural beauty that is also one of the 7 wonders of Oregon. Numerous fossils can be found throughout this portion of the John Day Fossil Beds that get its name from the colorful layers of various soils and sedimentary rock.
  • Metolius Balancing Rocks, Culver – Spice up your physics curriculum by visiting these huge boulders that sit precariously on narrow stone spires. Found in Cove Palisades State Park along the Metolius River, these rocks are what remains of volcanic activity from thousands of years ago. Families can get some exercise by hiking along the area and exploring the unique sculptures.

Homeschool Field Trips in Eastern Oregon

Homeschool Field Trips in Eastern Oregon
  • Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City – Students can learn about the historic, 2,100-mile Oregon Trail at this center that features exhibits, presentations, special events, and living history demonstrations. A number of educational resources are available online and homeschoolers can also take part in family fun days throughout the year.
  • Baker Heritage Museum, Baker City – Learn about the local history through exhibits, interpretive displays and artifacts that tell the story of this area. Visitors will learn about mining, ranching, agriculture, wildlife, and more. Photos and virtual exhibits are also available online.
  • Pete French Round Barn State Heritage Site, near Burns – Named for the cattle rancher who owned and constructed the barn, this site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Visitors can explore the round barn that was built around the 1870s and 1880s as well as the nearby gift shop.
  • Kam Wah Chung State Heritage Site, John Day – Once a Chinese medicine shop and general store, this museum was the home of two Chinese immigrants who came to be well known in the area for more than 50 years. Even though the building was abandoned for almost two decades, it was left intact and still houses thousands of artifacts. An interpretive center allows visitors to learn more through guided tours.

Field Trips in Mt. Hood & Columbia River Gorge

Field Trips in Mt. Hood & Columbia River Gorge
  • Mt. Hood Railroad, Hood River – Families can visit this historic railroad and take part in numerous excursions. Passengers will be able to take in the scenic ride that offers views of the Hood River and Mt. Hood. Visitors can also explore the Hutson museum and even witness a Western train ‘robbery’.
  • Multnomah Falls, Cascade Locks – Located in the Columbia River Gorge, this tiered waterfall is over 600 feet high, making it the tallest in the state. Visitors can take in the breathtaking views from a trail that leads to the Benson Footbridge . A visitor center in the Multnomah Falls Lodge offers trail maps and brochures to further enrich your visit.
  • Mt. Hood National Forest, Sandy – Made up of more than one million acres and home to a volcano of the same name, this national forest is one of the most visited in the U.S. Families can take part in a number of recreational activities including hiking, nature viewing, free fishing clinics, visitor programs and more.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Oregon Coast

Homeschool Field Trips in the Oregon Coast
  • Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport – Opened in 1992, this aquarium features exhibits that focus on the plants and animals found along the Oregon coast. It is home to the largest seabird aviary in North America. Homeschool programs are available and allows students to participate in lab programs, family sleepovers, and more.
  • Tillamook Cheese Factory, Tillamook – Homeschooled foodies can learn about the process of making cheese and even taste it at this creamery that offers free, self-guided tours. Founded in 1909, this creamery allows visitors to also learn about life on a dairy farm.
  • The Astoria Column, Astoria – Opened in 1926, the Astoria Column was built to celebrate the early settlers of the area and the discovery and expansion of the pacific coast. Visitors can climb the 164-step spiral staircase of this 123-foot tall column and get a bird’s eye view of the Columbia River and the surrounding city.
  • Thor’s Well, Yachats – This spectacular natural wonder is a popular tourist attraction, but but don’t stand too close. What seems like a hole in a rock is actually a collapsed sea cave that drain the ocean water right in during high tide and then spew it back out. Although it seems bottomless, it is believed to be about 20 feet deep.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Portland Region

Homeschool Field Trips in the Portland Region
  • International Rose Test Gardens , Portland – Study plant life at this garden in Washington Park that offers guided and self-guided tours for visitors. Families can take in the beauty of more than 10,000 rose bushes in over 600 varieties within the gardens 4.5 acres.
  • Portland Art Museum, Portland – Founded in 1892, this art museum is the oldest on the west coast. Homeschoolers can learn about art from different cultures including Native American, American, Asian, European and more. Artwork by artists such as Van Gogh, Cezanne, and Monet are on display. Family free days are held throughout the year as well as family tours.
  • The Sloth Center, Rainier – Home to the largest captive population of sloths, families can slow down and learn about these arboreal anteaters at this conservation facility. Numerous programs are available, some of which allow visitors to interact with the animals and even take part in a ‘sloth sleepover’. Please note that visits are by appointment only.

Homeschool Field Trips in Southern Oregon

Homeschool Field Trips in Southern Oregon
  • Crater Lake National Park, Crater Lake – Established in 1902, Crater Lake is the fifth oldest national park in the U.S. and the only one in Oregon. At its deepest point, the lake is 1,949 feet, making it the deepest in the country. Students can learn about the area, important science concepts, and more by taking part in the Classroom at Crater Lake field trip.
  • Wildlife Safari, Winston – Animal lovers can get an up close view of all kinds of wildlife at this park that opened its doors in 1972. Hundreds of animals are free to roam the 600-acre park that is home to elephants, lions, cheetahs, bald eagles, tortoises, and more. Students can take part in camps, classes, and even a junior zookeepers program.
  • Oregon Caves National Monument, Cave Junction – Take a tour of the marble caves within the Siskiyou Mountains and learn about these unique formations. Homeschoolers can take part in ranger-led family tours and hike one of six trails where you will come across meadows, forests, waterfalls, and more. This educational trip is sure to be one for the memory books!

Homeschool Field Trips in Willamette Valley

Homeschool Field Trips in Willamette Valley
  • Oregon State Capitol, Salem – Kick your history and social studies lessons into high gear by visiting the state capitol. Families can take a tour of either the building itself or the tower to learn about the state’s history and legislative process. An art collection and numerous exhibits are also available for exploring on the first floor of the building.
  • Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum, McMinnville – Take off into this aviation and space museum that is home to numerous military and civilian aircrafts, as well as several spacecrafts. Visitors can explore two exhibit halls, watch movies in an IMAX theater, take part in numerous educational programs, and homeschool days.
  • Silver Falls State Park, Silverton – The largest state park in Oregon is full of learning and recreational opportunities for homeschoolers. Be sure to check out the Trail of Ten Falls, which also includes the most visited waterfall, South Falls. Interpretive signage through the park allows students to learn more about the area.

OR Field Trips Unit Study Suppl.

Is there anything more fun than learning through field trips? To make your experiences at these destinations even more meaningful, Time4Learning members will appreciate this download of free activity tie-ins.

Download

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Simplifying The Mid-Year Homeschool Transition https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/simplifying-the-mid-year-homeschool-transition/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/simplifying-the-mid-year-homeschool-transition/#respond Thu, 29 Nov 2018 13:00:10 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=19492 If you’re making the homeschool leap mid-year, there are many benefits that homeschooling offers. Most importantly, homeschooling provides you with the freedom and flexibility that traditional schooling doesn’t offer. You set the rules, generate the schedule, and choose the curriculum. But before you get started homeschooling, there are several things you should do. Choosing an […]]]>

If you’re making the homeschool leap mid-year, there are many benefits that homeschooling offers. Most importantly, homeschooling provides you with the freedom and flexibility that traditional schooling doesn’t offer. You set the rules, generate the schedule, and choose the curriculum.

But before you get started homeschooling, there are several things you should do. Choosing an educational path that suits your children’s needs, following your state’s requirements, and keeping your children’s educational records can be overwhelming – especially for new homeschoolers. But don’t worry, there are people and places that will lend a helping hand.

Can You Start Homeschooling Anytime?

Yes! Once you’ve made the decision to homeschool, you can start doing so any time, even if it’s in the middle of a semester or school year. However, before you begin your homeschooling adventure, make sure you become familiar with your state’s homeschooling laws so that you don’t encounter any issues. Below are several important steps that will help make your transition into homeschooling a smooth one.

Let’s get started.

Know Your State Requirements

Every state has different requirements that you must follow as a homeschooling parent. For example, there are some states like New York with stricter laws and others, like Georgia, with more lenient ones. The amount of foot work you’ll have to do depends on which state you live in. You can easily find your state’s requirements by doing a quick online search or by visiting our homeschooling by state resources.

Some requirements that may or may not impact you include:

  • Notifying educational officials of your intent to homeschool
  • Parent qualifications — some states require the parent have a high school diploma or GED.
  • Required subjects that you must cover
  • Record keeping — some states require a portfolio of your student’s work.
  • Assessments requirements to make certain your student is making academic progress.

Withdraw Your Student

Depending on your state laws, you may be required to notify your school district that you are withdrawing your child from public school. It’s also a good idea to notify your school district. Truancy laws vary in each state, but each one has some law on the books. With that in mind, you should make certain that every entity is properly notified in a timely manner.

File an Intent to Homeschool

Many states require that you submit a notice of intent form when you begin homeschooling. Twenty-nine states require an annual form. The information on the form varies for each state. In some states, the intent form only requires the name of the homeschool and the administrator (the parent). Other states require a basic curriculum plan and maybe even your child’s name, grade level, and a copy of their birth certificate. Again, a simple online search for your local or state homeschooling organization will help you learn about your state’s requirements.

Many states offer the option of homeschooling under an umbrella (aka cover) school, which avoids the NOI altogether. Do a quick search to find out if this is an option in your state.

Explore Homeschool Curriculum Options

Homeschooling gives you the flexibility to pick and choose the lessons, assignments, materials, tools, and activities you’ll use when teaching certain subjects. For example, you can use web-based tools for math and science, and text books for reading if that fits your child’s learning styles and needs. There is no one perfect curriculum. You fashion the curriculum around your educational goals and your child’s strengths and weaknesses. You have the flexibility – take advantage.

Set Up Your Classroom & Create A Schedule

Classrooms can be set up in many ways. Some homeschoolers utilize one room for their students using traditional chalkboards or whiteboards, desks, and a dedicated area where they keep their supplies. Other parents utilize different rooms in their home, like the kitchen table or couch, and some have learning stations for different subjects. And for a just about all homeschoolers, the world is their classroom. The experiences gained from travelling can be just as invaluable as any learned in a classroom environment.

As far as scheduling out your day, a stringent school schedule, such as one public schools use, does not work for every child. A flexible schedule, on the other hand, lets you teach your children at the optimum time. For example, some children learn better in the morning while others prefer the afternoon. You not only maximize their learning, but your children can also learn at their own pace — not the pace designated for a whole classroom. It’s OK to do things outside the box if that makes you and your student happy.

Plan and Set Goals

The first important thing to do before you start planning and setting goals is something called deschooling. This is the process of shedding the traditional schooling methods that your children have experienced in public school. In other words, you are not bringing the classroom home with you. It is a time when children decompress, break away from the traditional learning process, and start adjusting to their new educational experience. Many parents don’t do any schooling during this time. They often read aloud to their children, practice real life skills such as cooking or baking, play games, and discuss the future with their children.

Next comes the goal setting and planning step. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, the poet and the author of The Little Prince, said, “A goal without a plan is just a wish.” And since your new homeschooling endeavor is seriously important to you and your child, creating a plan should not be just a “wish.” It’s a reality.

First off, evaluate your child’s education. Write down their strengths and weaknesses. Note the subjects they thrive in and the subjects that give them trouble. Have a meeting with your children and discuss what they enjoy about learning and what styles of learning they prefer. Some children like a more visual learning style, others prefer verbal learning. Once you know what curriculum you’ll be using, start preparing your lesson plans. Some homeschoolers like to plan out the whole year, others like to take things on a week by week basis.

Starting homeschooling mid-year may feel overwhelming for both you and your child, but it helps to allow everyone to decompress and take things slowly at first. Remember, homeschooling is an adventure. And all adventures have their challenges, their highs and lows, and their most inspiring moments. You will experience all these things as you and your children begin the process. Enjoy the adventure and don’t forget to have fun!

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How to Homeschool Through the Holiday Season https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/how-to-homeschool-through-the-holiday-season/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/how-to-homeschool-through-the-holiday-season/#respond Wed, 21 Nov 2018 13:00:12 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=19593 Is your “to-do” list packed? Will company be arriving to your house in a few short days? Decorations are only beginning to mesh and your shopping list reaches the ground. Although the holiday season is filled with joy, demands seem to be endless and stress, tangible. In the midst of chaos, it is difficult for […]]]>

Is your “to-do” list packed? Will company be arriving to your house in a few short days? Decorations are only beginning to mesh and your shopping list reaches the ground. Although the holiday season is filled with joy, demands seem to be endless and stress, tangible. In the midst of chaos, it is difficult for homeschoolers to maintain their typical homeschool routine. However, fun and easy ideas are available to assist you to homeschool through the holidays. It is alright to step away from textbooks or online lessons and supplement with holiday themed lessons, games, cooking, and more! You can still enjoy the holiday season with educational benefits by incorporating a holiday curriculum, history, generosity and games into your homeschool routine.

Life skills and academic intelligence can be taught anywhere. For example, most games teach social skills, perseverance, patience, and turn-taking. Plus, math is applied in scorekeeping. Below are some ideas that you can implement in your busy schedule to keep the learning going throughout the holidays.

Board Games

Monopoly and The Game of Life teach:

  • adult responsibilities
  • budgeting
  • negotiation
  • Investing

Scattergories and Taboo develop:

  • creative brainstorming
  • vocabulary extension

Puzzles, Jenga and Connect Four use:

  • critical thinking
  • logic

Scrabble teaches:

  • spelling
  • counting word score

Additionally, holiday trivia can be played with prizes from cookies to cash to motivate students. When your schedule overflows, allow these games to be played with confidence, knowing academic value is being impressed on your students.

Many subjects can be adjusted to include holiday activities that produce identical learning outcomes. Below are some examples:

Art

  • Homemade cards (try making a pop-up card!)
  • Christmas tree ornaments
  • Snow Globes
  • Kwanzaa map
  • Pine Cones
  • Handprint Menorahs

English/Writing

  • Analyze classic holiday poems/songs
  • Write a holiday tale (original or a spin-off from a classic)
  • Write about holiday traditions or history

Math and Science: Teach in the Kitchen!

  • Practice measuring ingredients
  • Try doubling recipes
  • Practice fractions
  • Notice physical and chemical changes as temperature affects food.
  • Discover how popcorn pops (A tiny drop of water in the starch filled coating that expands when heated)

The holidays are a memorable time for families around the globe. Studying some of the most unique holiday traditions from the winter season creates a great holiday curriculum in history that expands and deepens your child’s understanding of winter holidays and foreign cultures.

  • Study origins, history and the impacts of holidays.
  • Discover why Christmas is celebrated in December or why Winter Solstice began.
  • Did you know that Hanukkah was originally celebrated with oils before candles?
  • Or that Kwanzaa comes from the Swahili phrase “matunda ya kwanza” meaning “first fruits”?

Indeed, limitless fun facts and history engulf the winter holidays. These holidays and more can be studied including Yule, New Years Eve, Chinese New Year, Diwali, or Las Posadas. Unending history and cultural lessons are found in the backgrounds of holidays guaranteed to enrich your homeschooling experience during the holiday season.

While homeschooling during the holidays, the most valuable lessons of the holiday season are brought to life. Once they start learning about how other cultures celebrate the winter season and what the holidays mean to them, they will understand that many share the true spirit of the holidays. Which lies in kindness, sharing and spending time with loved ones. Some states require good citizenship to be taught in their homeschool; this season provides a perfect opportunity to display faithful citizenship and help students recognize their prosperity. Encourage students to sort through old clothes, backpacks, shoes, toys and stuffed animals to donate to orphans, foster children, or homeless shelters. Make crafts or cards and bring them to a retirement home or homeless shelter. This season is a wonderful time to teach generosity, sacrifice and good citizenship by gifting others.

It is possible to continue homeschooling during the holiday season. With adjustments, these celebrations generate fun opportunities to create a new holiday homeschool schedule. Subjects can be conformed to include holiday themes, or adjusted to fulfill education around your festivities. Moreover, studying holiday’s historical backgrounds develops understanding while donating improves character and benefits others. Games, educational adjustments, and generosity can all be leveraged to strengthen academics and character growth in your students throughout the holidays.

Free Holiday Printable Worksheet

Looking for more ways to incorporate all winter holidays into your child’s education? Download this holiday printable and learn about holidays such as Christmas, Yom Kippur, Kwanzaa, and more!

Download

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Unit Study Supplement: John Adams, U.S. 2nd President https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-president-john-adams/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-president-john-adams/#respond Thu, 15 Nov 2018 13:30:00 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=19426 Education was taken seriously in the Adam’s family and John was very serious when it came to learning. He was not only homeschooled by his father and mother, but accompanied his dad in various trips abroad. This allowed him to gain an abundance of knowledge through his studies and travel. The wealth of knowledge he […]]]>

Education was taken seriously in the Adam’s family and John was very serious when it came to learning. He was not only homeschooled by his father and mother, but accompanied his dad in various trips abroad. This allowed him to gain an abundance of knowledge through his studies and travel. The wealth of knowledge he learned from the diverse educational opportunities he encountered allowed him to thrive.

Serving as our nation’s first vice president and 2nd President of the United States of America, President John Adams constantly pursued independence, peace and honor. In addition to his time in office, Adams achieved respect in numerous other instances. He graduated from Harvard where he earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degree, and excelled as a lawyer, writer, diplomat and Founding Father of the USA.

Adams persistently fought for the betterment of our country in and out of office. Before presidency, he refused to relent until the U.S. acquired independence. As President, Adams maintained peace in the midst of thick turmoil. His hunger for honor and respect drove his perseverance to excel in all his occupations. 217 years later, we can admire John Adams’ accomplishments including all the effort, wisdom and peace he contributed to our beloved country.

John Adams Fast Facts

Presidential Order 2nd
Political Party Federalist
Born October 30, 1735
Death July 4, 1826
State of Birth Massachusetts
Names of Spouse Abigail Smith
Served as President 1797-1801
Age When Elected to Office 61
Vice Presidents Thomas Jefferson

John Adams Timeline

1735

Born on October 30th in Braintree (now Quincy) Massachusetts.

1751

Entered Harvard College at age 16.

1755

Graduated from Harvard College with a Bachelor of Arts degree. Afterwards, Adams taught school in Worcester before deciding to pursue law.

1756

Began reading law under John Putman (an outstanding lawyer in Worcester).

1758

Acquired a Master of Arts degree from Harvard.

1763

Published 7 political theory essays in Boston newspapers under the pen name “Humphrey Ploughjogger”.

1764

Married Abigail Smith on October 25th.

1765

Wrote “Braintree Instructions” which was sent to the Massachusetts a representative to encourage opposition towards the Stamp Act of 1765.

1767

Son, John Quincy Adams, who would become the 6th president of the United States, is born.

1774

Attended First Continental Congress.

1775

Attended Second Continental Congress

1776

U.S. gained independence.

1777

Accepted a position as a Commissioner to France. John Quincy Adams accompanied.

1780

Traveled to the Dutch Republic as an ambassador.

1785

Appointed first American ambassador to Great Britain.

1789

Became vice president under George Washington.

1797

  • Sworn into office as second president.
  • Promised to send a peace treaty to France, but also called for increase in army defenses because of France’s threat. The Peace treaty was rejected the following year.

1798

  • Adams signs “Alien and Sedition Acts”.
  • May – Undeclared Quasi War began.
  • The Secretary of Navy position is created in the Cabinet.
  • Enacted Direct Tax of 1789 to pay for Quasi War.

1789

Became vice president under George Washington.

1800

Lost election, succeeded by Thomas Jefferson, his former friend and vice president.

1826

Died at age 90 from congestive heart failure.

Interesting Facts About John Adams

While learning about John Adams’ accomplishments may be interesting, homeschoolers may also enjoy discovering the lesser known facts about the 2nd President of the United States.

  • Adams was the first president to live in the White House. He and his family inhabited it for 4 months while the paint was still wet.
  • Adams organized the “Committee of 5” who drafted the Declaration of Independence.
  • Deeming campaigning a “silly and wicked game”, Adams never campaigned for presidency.
  • The Navy department in The Cabinet was created by Adams during his presidency.
  • Adams is nicknamed “Father of the Navy” because of the relationship he held with the Navy while in office.
  • The oldest professional musical organization in the country, the United States Marine Band, was formed by Adams.
  • At a young age, Adams often skipped school to pursue his passions. Later, he was homeschooled by his mother and father.
  • Adams was committed to diary writing. His journals are filled with well written entries covering varieties of topics including events, people and sentiments.
  • His presidency is the only term that contained a president and vice president from different political parties.
  • Despite their disagreements, Thomas Jefferson and Adams were wonderful friends. However, their friendship was shattered when Jefferson succeeded Adams as president in 1801. After 11 years of silence and discord, Adams wrote to Jefferson, and their friendship was restored. Although they never saw each other in person again, they communicated through letters for 14 years until their death.
  • Jefferson and Adams died on the same day, exactly 50 years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1826.
  • Adams’ last words were “Thomas Jefferson survives.” Ironically, Jefferson had died a few hours before.
  • He is one of the few Founding Fathers who never owned a slave.
  • Adams is the father of the 6th president, John Quincy Adams.
  • The first five presidents of the US were all born in Virginia, except for John Adams who was born in Massachusetts.
  • Father of the United States Marine Band, the oldest continuously active professional musical organization in our country.

Hands-On Activities for John Adams Unit Study

Elementary John Adams Activities

  • Adams journaled very well, leaving wonderful information for later historians. He documented events and recorded information about people. Make a diary entry like Adams would; describe people in your life or the events of your day.
  • Hunting was a favorite hobby of Adams’ as a student. Today, hunting laws are different in every state. Research the laws in your state and discover which apply to you.

Middle School John Adams Activities

  • Adams wrote many letters to his wife, family, friends and politicians. He used strong honest words and wrote in an eloquent fashion. Write a formal letter to someone you know.
  • Adams helped draft the Declaration of Independence. Memorize The Preamble of the Declaration of Independence to receive a deeper understanding of what the Founding Fathers wished to accomplish in the newborn country.

High School John Adams Activities

  • Adams wrote many important political documents and political opinion essays including the Massachusetts Constitution, Braintree Instructions, True Sentiments of America and Thoughts on Government. Attempt to write an official political document.
  • As president, Adams signed several controversial bills and often acted against the advice of his Cabinet. Although he successfully kept our country in peace, he divided his Federalist party and upset the Democratic-Republicans. This resulted in his loss of re-election. Write a report explaining what Adams could have done better to win re-election, but don’t forget to include the advances he contributed to our newly born country.

Quick John Adams Spelling Words

Founding Father
Independence advocate
duality righteousness
pugnacity Pragmatic
Diplomat Commissioner

Additional Learning Links for John Adams

Want to extend your American presidents unit study even further? The following learning resources offer even more interesting facts about John Adams life and times and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

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