Time4Learning https://www.time4learning.com Homeschool, Afterschool, Skill Building Sun, 11 Nov 2018 12:10:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Unit Study Supplement: Theodore Roosevelt, U.S. 26th President https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-president-theodore-roosevelt/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-president-theodore-roosevelt/#respond Thu, 01 Nov 2018 12:30:22 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=19074 Theodore Roosevelt was the youngest president to serve and an extraordinary one. He worked very hard to improve the quality life for the average American. Born and raised in New York, Roosevelt was homeschooled, then went on to attend Harvard University and then later studied Law at Columbia. He entered the politics field afterwards, becoming a part […]]]>

Theodore Roosevelt was the youngest president to serve and an extraordinary one. He worked very hard to improve the quality life for the average American. Born and raised in New York, Roosevelt was homeschooled, then went on to attend Harvard University and then later studied Law at Columbia. He entered the politics field afterwards, becoming a part of the New York legislature. After a tragic loss of his first wife and mother, he went to work on the ranch.

In 1886, he returned to New York and began to work in a variety of government jobs over the next few years. When the Spanish-American war broke out he created a volunteer cavalry regiment that became known as the “Rough Riders.” He was a conservationist, creating land for future parks and helping to establish the forest service in the United States. Today, we will be exploring some facts about Theodore Roosevelt’s presidency and life.

Theodore Roosevelt Fast Facts

Presidential Order 26th
Political Party Republican
Born October 27, 1858
Death January 6, 1919
State of Birth New York
Names of Spouse Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt
Served as President 1901-1909
Age When Elected to Office 43
Vice Presidents Charles Warren Fairbanks

Theodore Roosevelt Timeline

1858

Theodore Roosevelt born on October 27th

1876-77

September – Begins education at Harvard University

1880

  • June 30 – Graduates from Harvard with an A.B. Magna Cum Laude
  • October 27 – Marries Alice Hathaway Lee on his 22nd birthday
  • December – Enters Columbia Law School

1881

November – Elected to the New York State Assembly (youngest ever elected to the office)

1882-83

  • Roosevelt’s first book, The Naval War of 1812, is published. The book helps modernize and build the U.S. Navy.
  • August 1 – Joins the National Guard; commissioned a Second Lieutenant
  • January 1 – Elected Speaker of Republican Assembly (minority leader)

1884

  • Returns home after receiving telegram his wife and mother are ill
  • February 14 – Mother Martha Bulloch Roosevelt dies of typhoid fever; hours later, wife Alice Hathaway Lee Roosevelt dies from kidney failure
  • June 3 – Delegate to the Republican National Convention

1889

May – Starts as U.S. Civil Service Commissioner in Washington, DC; holds position until 1895

1895

  • May 5 – Resigns Civil Service Commission to become Police Commissioner of New York City
  • May 6 – Elected President of the Board of Police Commissioners

1897

April 19 – Appointed Assistant Secretary of the Navy by President William McKinley

1898

  • Receives Lieutenant-Colonel commission and forms the “Rough Riders”
  • May to August – Serves in Cuba during Spanish-American War; promoted to Colonel
  • August 14 – The Rough Riders land at Montauk, Long Island, to begin a six-week quarantine
  • September 27 – Nominated by the Republican Party for Governor of New York State
  • November 8 – Elected Governor of New York State; serves until end of 1900

1900

November 6 – Elected vice president

1901

  • March to September – Serves as vice president
  • September 6 – President McKinley shot while Roosevelt is hiking in the Adirondacks
  • September 14 – Becomes 26th President of the United States, youngest to ever hold the office

1902

  • February – Begins first of 45 antitrust suits to dissolve business monopolies
  • 1904-1905
  • Re-elected president
  • Establishes United States Forest Service

1906

  • Establishes numerous national parks and monuments
  • December – Awarded Nobel Peace Prize for mediating treaty of Russo-Japanese War

1909

  • March – Presidency ends
  • By 1909 there was an established 230 million acres of public lands

1910

Accepts Nobel Peace Prize (from 1905) in Norway

1912

  • February – Receives petition from Republican governors to accept nomination for president
  • August – Nominated as presidential candidate for Progressive party
  • October 14 – Shot in the chest before campaign speech; finishes speech totaling 84-minutes
  • November 5 – Despite receiving largest number of votes for a third-party candidate, loses presidential election to Woodrow Wilson

1914

  • February to April – Embarks on an expedition to explore an uncharted tributary of Amazon River
  • Sustains severe leg injury during expedition and nearly dies
  • May – Publishes Through the Brazilian Wilderness and Life Histories of African Game Animals

1919

January 6 – Dies in sleep at Sagamore Hill

Interesting Facts About Theodore Roosevelt

While learning about Theodore Roosevelt’s accomplishments may be interesting, homeschoolers may also enjoy discovering the lesser known facts about the 26th President of the United States.

  • Roosevelt was able to recite obscure poetry and other content well over a decade after he read the documents.
  • Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt were fifth cousins. Eleanor Roosevelt was Theodore’s niece. And Uncle Theodore presented the bride at Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s wedding.
  • Roosevelt was a college dropout, while Roosevelt graduated from Harvard, he left law school at Columbia without receiving a degree. Roosevelt had become focused on local politics and lost interest in a legal career.
  • In 1906 Theodore Roosevelt became the first American to win the Nobel Peace Prize for his success in ending the Russo-Japanese War
  • His nicknames include; Teddy, Trust Buster, TR and the Great Conservationist
  • Theodore Roosevelt had two pets a guinea pig; who he named Father O’Grady and a snake called Emily Spinach!
  • A sculpture of Theodore Roosevelt’s head, measuring 60-foot high (18 m) is carved into the granite of Mount Rushmore, South Dakota
  • The teddy bear was named after Roosevelt, in response to a cartoon showing the president refusing to shoot a bear after it had been tied to a tree.
  • As the first conservationist president, he spearheaded the creation of the United States Forest Service, and established five new national parks.
  • His other jobs were quite varied: cattle rancher, deputy sheriff, historian, naturalist, explorer, author of 35 books, police commissioner, assistant Secretary of the Navy, governor of New York, war hero, and lawyer.
  • At 42, he was the youngest person to become president, when President McKinley was assassinated.
  • President Theodore Roosevelt officially named the White House in 1901.

Hands-On Activities for Theodore Roosevelt Unit Study

Now that you’ve learned about Theodore Roosevelt’s accomplishments, try out some of these ideas, which we’ve organized by grade level, to enhance your Theodore Roosevelt Presidency Facts study.

Elementary Theodore Roosevelt Activities

  • Theodore Roosevelt was very active in the creation of the United States Forest, responsible for 42 million acres. Print out a map of the United States and have students color in the states where national parks were created.
  • Mr. Roosevelt was known as the father of our country, have your students use colored pencils or crayons to draw the sculpture at Mount Rushmore, where he is featured along with George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln.

Middle School Theodore Roosevelt Activities

  • Theodore Roosevelt wrote over 35 books. Have your child pick out a favorite book or article, and see how many words per minute they can read.
  • Theodore Roosevelt led a volunteer group, known as the “Rough Riders” into the Spanish American War. Write a short summary on the causes of the war.

High School Theodore Roosevelt Activities

  • In 1906, Mr. Roosevelt won the nobel peace prize for his success in ending the Russo-Japanese War. Write a short report on what he did to help assist this success.
  • Theodore Roosevelt was very active in writing, look at two of his books and write a comparison paper on the two pieces of work.

Quick Theodore Roosevelt Spelling Words

youngest desegregation
wealthiest sophistication
heroism upperclassman
courage gentlemanly
assassination visionary

Additional Learning Links for Theodore Roosevelt

Want to extend your American presidents unit study even further? The following learning resources offer even more interesting facts about Theodore Roosevelt’s life and times and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

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Nevada Field Trips for Homeschoolers https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/nevada-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/nevada-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/#respond Thu, 01 Nov 2018 12:00:42 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=19109 Vast desert, a rich mining industry, and world-famous tourist destinations make Nevada a state full of educational field trip ideas. If you’re looking for things to do with kids in Nevada, look no further. Here, you’ll find a list of places to visit that will enhance your homeschool and give your children fun, hands-on learning […]]]>

Vast desert, a rich mining industry, and world-famous tourist destinations make Nevada a state full of educational field trip ideas. If you’re looking for things to do with kids in Nevada, look no further. Here, you’ll find a list of places to visit that will enhance your homeschool and give your children fun, hands-on learning opportunities. Whether you’re into science, animals or history, these homeschool field trips in Nevada will get them excited about learning.

To start planning your field trips, use this printable map of Nevada. You’ll also find free Time4Learning lesson plans that you can download at the end of this post to help supplement your fun field trips in Nevada.

Home education is not the same in every state. Make sure you’re getting the information you need to start homeschooling in the Silver State.

Homeschool in NV Now!

Homeschool Field Trips in Southern Nevada

Field Trips in Southern Nevada
  • Hoover Dam, near Boulder City – Located on the Nevada/Arizona border, the Hoover Dam opened in 1936 and stands just over 726 feet. Visitors to this National Historic Landmark can learn about this engineering marvel through guided tours, exhibits, and more.
  • Valley of Fire State Park, Overton – With 40,000 acres to explore, visitors to Nevada’s oldest and largest state park can take in the colorful, red sandstone formations that formed millions of years ago. A visitors center features several educational exhibits.
  • Lion Habitat Ranch, Henderson – Fans of these big cats will love exploring this 8.5-acre ranch that is home to roughly 40 lions. Visitors can even book a ‘behind-the-scenes’ tour or take part in a number of experiences such as Feast with the Beasts, Feed the Animals, and a training session.
  • Shark Reef Aquarium at Mandalay Bay, Las Vegas – With 14 exhibits and over 2,000 animals, visitors can awe at the aquatic animals at this hotel located on the strip. Be sure to walk through the tunnels surround by glass and visit the touch pool for an up close view. Educational tours are available for groups.
  • Tonopah Historic Mining Park, Tonopah – Visitors to this 100-acre park can learn more about the mining industry through self-guided tours, exhibits, historical reenactments, and more.
  • Springs Preserve, Las Vegas – This 180-acre preserve is the perfect place for an educational trip where your homeschoolers can explore botanical gardens, take a nature walk on the numerous trails, visit museum exhibits, and more. Kids camps and guided tours as also available.

Homeschool Field Trips in Central Nevada

Field Trips in Central Nevada
  • Nevada Northern Railway Museum, Ely – Designated a National Historic Landmark in 2006, this museum features a collection of locomotives, freight and passenger rail cars, and more. Visitors can go on a train ride, take part in a number of hands-on opportunities, or take a walking tour at the main depot.
  • Cathedral Gorge State Park, Panaca – Enhance your geology and geography curriculum by taking a trip to this breathtaking location that covers over 1,600 acres. Families can picnic, camp, hike the trails, and explore the visitor center to learn about the natural area and how the formations came to be.
  • Kershaw Ryan State Park, Caliente – Considered an oasis in the desert of Nevada, this 265-acre state park features a picturesque valley, natural springs, and even a wading pool for children. First settled in 1873, families can study the natural area as they hike the trails and explore the gardens.
  • Great Basin National Park, Baker – Located in White Pine County, this 77,000-acre park is home to Wheeler Peak, the second highest point in Nevada, the Lehman Caves, and tons of other natural features. Study up on history, biology and geology through exhibits, films, and more.

Homeschool Field Trips in Northern Nevada

Field Trips in Northern Nevada
  • Northeastern Nevada Museum, Elko – Homeschoolers can learn about the art, animals, and local history of the area through numerous exhibits, galleries and dioramas. Educational programs are available as well as other special events for children.
  • Royal Peacock Black Fire Opal Mine, near Denio – If you live in or will be in the northwestern Nevada area, stop by this opal mine that has allowed visitors to mine their very own opals since 1981. There are several mining options to choose from and staff is available to answer questions and show you the ropes.
  • California Trail Interpretive Center, Elko – Interactive exhibits and demonstrations allow visitors to learn about the 2,000 mile journey that pioneers took on their way to California in the 1800s. Junior ranger programs are held throughout the year as well as other events.
  • Rainbow Ridge Opal Mine, Virgin Valley – Learn how opals are formed in petrified wood in this area where prospecting and mining for the stone began around 1907. Families can even dig the mine for a fee. Don’t forget to take lots of water and an umbrella for the sun!

Homeschool Field Trips in Western Nevada

Field Trips in Western Nevada
  • National Automobile Museum, Reno – Opened in 1989, this museum’s collection includes more than 200 cars dating as far back as the late 19th century. Educational programs and activities are available for families as well as Science Saturdays on the second Saturday of every month.
  • Children’s Museum of Northern Nevada, Carson City – In addition to numerous educational and interactive exhibits, this museum also hosts several weekly programs for children. Visitors can also take part in science workshops and explore the STEM room with different centers.
  • Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, Reno – Built in 1963, this center features a number of different planetarium shows and a hands-on exhibit hall. Exhibits include Living in Space, What’s Up, Our Earth, and more. Homeschoolers can take part in the field trip program for groups.
  • Lake Tahoe, Stateline – Visit the largest alpine lake in North America, located on the California/Nevada border. Guests can explore one of several visitor centers to learn more about the area and the lake that was formed roughly 2 million years ago. Families can also cross over to the California side and check out Vikingsholm, Tahoe’s hidden castle, so your homeschooler can get a glimpse of Nordic style living.

NV Field Trips Unit Study Suppl.

Is there anything more fun than learning through field trips? To make your experiences at these destinations even more meaningful, Time4Learning members will appreciate this download of free activity tie-ins.

Download

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Unit Study Supplement: Nevada Facts, U.S. 36th State https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-nevada-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-nevada-facts/#respond Thu, 25 Oct 2018 12:00:26 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=18520 The rich history and diverse geography in Nevada creates a great study and wonderful visiting destination. Nevada is more famously known for its extravagant hotels and casinos in the city of Las Vegas. However, in this study, you will discover transitions Nevada experienced before entering the United States, reasons for statehood and familiarize yourself with […]]]>

The rich history and diverse geography in Nevada creates a great study and wonderful visiting destination. Nevada is more famously known for its extravagant hotels and casinos in the city of Las Vegas. However, in this study, you will discover transitions Nevada experienced before entering the United States, reasons for statehood and familiarize yourself with the various areas of lands and activities Nevada contains.

In this unit study supplement, you will learn fun facts about Nevada, geography, educational field trip opportunities, free printable downloads, and more that will enhance your study of the state.

You can also download our list of PreK-12 interactive lessons that align with your study of interesting facts about Nevada.

Nevada Fast Facts

Became a State October 31, 1864
Order it Joined the Union 36th state
State Capital Carson City
State Abbreviation NV
Border States
State Flag Nevada State Flag
State Songs Home Means Nevada
State Flower Sagebrush
State Nicknames
  • Silver State
  • Battle Born State
  • Sagebrush State
Notable Nevadans
  • Andre Agassi, Professional Tennis Player
  • Pat Nixon, Former first lady
  • Lute Pease, Pulitzer Prize winner, artist
  • Henry Fountain Ashurst, producer/actor
  • Bryce Harper, baseball player
  • Amy Purdy ,professional snowboarder
  • Kurt Busch, professional racer

Historical Facts About Nevada

Modern day “Nevada” was inhabited long before Europeans arrived on set. Several Native American tribes lived in this land many years before. These tribes included the Shoshone, Paiute, Washoe, and Mohave tribes. Francisco Garces, a Spanish explorer and missionary was the first European to enter Nevada. Afterwards, Europeans continued to trickle in throughout the 1800’s. In 1827, an explorer named Jedediah Smith primarily mapped out the area for later travelers.

At first, Nevada was a part of Spain, until Mexico claimed it during their War of Independence. In 1821, Mexico won their independence from Spain, and officially owned Nevada as a part of their territory of Alta California. However, The United States soon acquired Nevada and much more land in the Mexican-American War through the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. America gained over 525,000 square miles of land in exchange for $15,000,000.

As official territory of the U.S.,  Nevada was included in the Mexican Cession Territory until it combined with the territory of Utah in 1850. Mormons created a settlement along the future border of Nevada and Utah, but conflict quickly arose between them and residents of Nevada. Federal troops were sent to the territory after receiving complaints regarding the Mormons. As a result, the Mormons left, then non-mormons took over and launched a separate statehood. On March 2, 1861 Nevada split from Utah and became its own territory. During this time, many people passed through Nevada on their way to the California gold mines amid the Gold Rush from 1848 -1855. Nevada’s population was later boosted when large amounts of silver were found within the territory in 1859.

Despite Nevada’s small population that disqualified their admittance into the union, they were accepted eagerly and urgently as a state. Nevada was one of two states that was accepted into the Union during the Civil War (hence the nickname: Battle Born State). Abraham Lincoln’s reelection was falling short and he required the support of an additional state in order to be elected again and incorporate his Pro-Northern ideas into the constitution and end the war. Urgently, Nevada requested statehood, sending a 16,543 word telegram, costing $4,303.27 (equivalent to $67,332 in 2017) to assure timely acceptance. On October 31, 1864 Nevada was admitted into the United States as the 36th state, just 8 days before the 1864 presidential election. Nevada then, supported Lincoln through the end of the war.

TimeLine

1775

Francisco Garces is the first European in Nevada.

1821

Mexico claims territory after winning Independence from Spain.

1827

Jedediah Smith enters Las Vegas Valley.

1828

Peter Skene Ogden travels the Humboldt River.

1848

Mexico cedes Nevada and other territories to the U.S. after the Mexican-American War.

1850

Nevada added to Utah Territory.

1851

Mormons set up a station that lead to California goldfields.

1857

Federal troops sent to Nevada after complaints sent from non-mormons in Nevada.

1859

The Comstock Lode, a silver deposit is found.

1860

Paiute War (also known as Pyramid Lake War).

1861

Nevada becomes a territory separate from Utah.

1861

Carson City is named the capital of Nevada.

1864

Nevada is admitted into the Union and becomes the 36th state of the nation.

1912

Pat Nixon, first lady (1968-75) to President Richard Nixon born in Ely, Nevada.

1931

Nevada legalized gambling again. Boulder (now Hoover) Dam construction begins

1935

Hoover Dam renamed after President Herbert Hoover is completed.

1941

Las Vegas strip was established.

1951

 Nuclear testing in Nevada begins.

1956

Flamingo Hotel opens.

1966 – 1998

Circus Circus, MGM Grand, Mandalay Bay, Venetian and The Bellagio hotels and casinos open.

1992

Nuclear testing in the state ceases

Bring history and geography to life with Time4Learning’s interactive online social studies curriculum for grades 2-12.

Geographical Facts About Nevada

Nevada geography contains deserts, rivers, lakes, and mountains; within its beauty is diversity and extremity. The State holds 17 counties with a population of 2,998,039 (as of 2017).  It is 33rd largest in population, but 7th largest in land area. Nevada posses 150 mountain ranges, making it the most mountainous state. 30 of her mountains exceed 11,000 feet and the highest (Boundary Peak) reaches 13,140 ft.

Furthermore, Nevada is also the driest state in the U.S., holding many deserts like The Great Basin Desert, Colorado Plateau, Mojave Desert, Sonoran Desert and Smoke Creek Desert. Ironically, Nevada also includes many bodies of water such as Lake Tahoe, Colorado River, Lake Mead, Pyramid Lake and more. Indeed, the land of Nevada carries many diversities in land, from mountains to deserts to lakes.

Below are some interesting facts about Nevada’s geography:

  • Nevada was named for its snowy mountains in the winter. “Nevada” means “snow covered” in Spanish.
  • Nevada is the largest gold-producing state in the nation and second in the world behind South Africa.
  • Nevada once held a destination that tested nuclear weapons. 928 nuclear tests took place between 1951 to 1992. The destination was located in the southeastern Nye County, Nevada desert about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas.
  • The Hoover Dam was built during the Great Depression in 1931. It is located between the U.S. states of Nevada and Arizona. It increases electric power, helps flood control and controls river regulation. The construction was completed in 1936.
  • Nevada contains the second lowest point in the Western Hemisphere, 282 ft below sea level.
  • Las Vegas, located in southern Nevada,  holds more hotel rooms than any other place in the world.
  • 85% of Nevada is owned by the federal government.

Nevada State Map

Download our FREE Nevada state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download Map of Nevada

Activities for Children in Nevada

One of the many perks of homeschooling is that you can take the learning outside. Do you currently homeschool in Nevada or plan to visit the state in the near future? If so, there are a plethora of educational opportunities, even some free ones, all around the state. Below are just a few ideas to get you started:

  • The Hoover Dam – Try visiting the Hoover Dam to observe the massive structure and learn it’s key purposes. It is the Nation’s 3rd largest dam standing at 726 ft. The Hoover Dam has many purposes including providing a strong hydroelectric power, protecting areas from floods, and supplying a reliable source of water. Learn more about the dam’s benefits through tours and more when you visit it.
  • Lake Mead National Recreation Area  – This national recreation area follows along the the Arizona-Nevada border which spans over 1.5 million acres and is 110 miles long. Depending on what time of the year you visit, temperatures can hit a high of 120º Fahrenheit in the summer months and drop well below freezing during the winter. Whether you are looking to hike, canoe, kayak, or swim, Lake Mead National Recreation area offers something for everyone.
  • Pony Express National Historic Trail – This trail stretches from St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento California and a portion of it lies in Nevada. It is known for its highly productive mail delivery route in early U.S. History. On the Pony Express Trail in Nevada, you can hike, ride a horse and visit 5 past Pony Express stations. Take time to enjoy the nature and history along the trail route.
  • National Atomic Testing Museum – Receive a deeper understanding of the history of past nuclear tests in Nevada and its importance. This museum works through educational and scientific programs to develop insight to the atomic bomb testing. Find exhibits that explain the possibility of the testing, how to survive the impact of an atomic bomb and more.
  • Nevada State Museum – Discover unending and enduring Nevada state facts in the official Nevada State Museum. Study Native American tribes from Nevada, early settlers, minors, hear more about the Hoover Dam and Atomic Bomb testing sights along with the rise of Las Vegas’ popularity. This museum will enrich your knowledge of Nevada in all topics. It is free for Nevada residents, along with children 18 years and younger, but a cost of $20 is required for out of state residents.
  • Springs Preserve –  Located approximately 3 miles west of downtown Las Vegas, the Springs Preserve consists of 180 acres. You can walk, bike, or ride the train through the 3.5 mile long preserve to get a sense of where Las Vegas began. Cost of admission ranges between $4.95 – $18.95 depending on if you are a NV resident and ages of your children/guest.

Nevada Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Great Basin National Park – Experience the beauty found in Nevada at The Great Basin National Park. Visit for a day or camp for a week. Watch the night sky light up or explore intricately designed caves. This National Park is free to visit but costs to camp.
  • 7 Magic Mountains – Driving along the Interstate 15, you will see neon-stacked boulders against the desert scenery. This is Land Art displayed in Nevada created by Ugo Rondinone and provided by the Art Production Fund and the Nevada Museum of Art. If desired, you may visit this piece of art for free.
  • Tree House & Play Zone at the Container Park – Container Park located in downtown Las Vegas holds enjoyable activities for everyone. From shops and meals to large and exciting playgrounds. Everyone will find something to enjoy in the Container Park.
  • Galena Creek Regional Park – Located in Reno, Nevada, Galena Creek Regional Park is filled with natural and cultural history. You can roam around the park and identify the different wildlife you might come across while exploring the park. Also, Galena Creek Regional Park organizes homeschool program days for homeschool groups and students, where they can perform outdoor science-based field study activities. (Cost is $5.00 per child)

Nevada Learning Games for Children

Make sure to check out these available resources to assess your child’s knowledge about Nevada and learn even more about the Silver State.

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Sharpen Your Child’s STEM Skills With An After-School Program https://www.time4learning.com/blog/afterschoolskill-building/sharpen-your-childs-stem-skills/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/afterschoolskill-building/sharpen-your-childs-stem-skills/#respond Thu, 18 Oct 2018 12:00:04 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=16945 STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) pervades our lives — from the roads and bridges that take us from point A to point B every day to calculating our budget for our grocery store list. Not only is STEM a big driver of our global economy, but it continuously generates new career opportunities for men […]]]>

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) pervades our lives — from the roads and bridges that take us from point A to point B every day to calculating our budget for our grocery store list. Not only is STEM a big driver of our global economy, but it continuously generates new career opportunities for men and women.

What is the importance of STEM Education?

Whether you homeschool or your child is traditionally schooled, an after-school program to supplement what they are learning is something you should consider. Supplementing your child’s current curriculum can make the difference that helps ensure your child’s success especially as it relates to STEM.

STEM (Science, technology, education and mathematics) allows children to learn through hands-on activities that apply to real-life scenarios. STEM allows students to push their limits and open a new horizon of opportunities while they acquire and build on their knowledge, important life skills, critical thinking, problem-solving, and more.

STEM education shapes the future by supporting innovation and design of new technologies that will further the world. This is why many educators, homeschooling parents and school teachers alike, around the U.S have begun incorporating STEM into their curriculum.

According to the National Science Foundation, the 21st century is highly technological and information-based because of globalization and the growing economy. STEM education is incredibly important in our fast-moving society, and can even break divides that exist in education.

The reason for this push can be found in STEM career statistics: jobs in STEM are growing at 13%, while non-STEM careers have a 9.8% growth rate. There are over nine million STEM workers in the United States and employment rates for the field continue to grow.

Because STEM skills are so important, parents should ensure that their child is getting the proper education. For STEM education in particular, it might be best to use an after-school online program to supplement what your child is learning in school. At Time4Learning, we have plenty to offer as an after-school program in STEM subjects.

Science Curriculum

Since science knowledge is constantly changing, we have divided up our science education in a unique way so students of any age can develop science skills.

  • K-5 Science: At the lower levels, science is divided by grade level to ensure that students learn fundamental science skills and can build upon them through hands-on science experiments and more. Think of these years as general science knowledge; students will have a basic understanding of nearly every science topic under the sun! The Kindergarten through 5th grade years can also give your student time to develop his or her interests in science, so your child can specialize in a particular subject area, if desired.
  • Middle School and High School
    • Earth/Space Science Curriculum: Students learn in depth how the Earth is structured and the various cycles that make life possible. Outer space is also observed in-depth, allowing students to grow their education out of this world! Earth and Space Science is an experience open to middle and high school students. Check out this free high school space science worksheet!
    • Life Science and Biology Curriculum: This particular class is more suited for students who are interested in the small picture, especially if they have any interest in medicine! Learn about plants, animals, and humans, and the cells that make them. Since this topic is so in-depth, there are two courses. Biology is geared towards high school students, whereas Life Science is suited for middle school students.
    • Physical Science Curriculum: For students who can’t wait to learn about chemistry and physics, this course is a great start! After-school students will discover atoms, molecules, states of matter, how heat works, and more. This is offered as a class for middle and high school
    • Chemistry and Physics Curriculum: High school students who loved physical science will also enjoy either chemistry or physics! Offered as two separate classes, chemistry and physics allow students to focus on a specific area of the physical sciences to perhaps discover their passion.

Math Curriculum

For students developing STEM skills, it is important to have a solid foundation of information. This is no exception for math; our curriculum is broken down by grade level to ensure that your student will succeed as he or she continues in STEM education. To do so, we focus on five math strands for each grade:

  • Number Sense and Operations: This strand is important for all grades, even for high school students. It is the ability to represent and compare numbers, and it ensures an understanding in number theory, place values, and an understanding of operations. Check out this free math fractions worksheet for elementary students!
  • Geometry and Spatial Sense: Younger children are taught different shapes, which is information later built upon to create understandings of 2D and 3D shapes. Eventually, students will be able to apply this knowledge to high school geometry and trigonometry.
  • Measurement: The ability to take measurements, count and sort money, determine temperature, and tell time are essential. These basic skills can be easy to lose track of throughout the years, but are essential to every grade level.
  • Data Analysis and Probability: From figuring out the odds of a penny landing on “heads,” all the way to determining if an experiment has statistical importance, data analysis builds important skills. This strand is particularly important in helping visual learners avoid math anxiety.
  • Algebra Curriculum: Starting at a young age, children begin to sort and order objects and numbers using pattern recognition. These skills develop into the ability to solve more complex problems, such as high school algebra I or II classes.

Using Time4Learning for afterschool STEM-skill building

Time4Learning has plenty to offer to students of all ages and educational backgrounds. Parents have the ability to designate specific lessons for their child to complete, which can help students struggling in a particular subject area. Our software is web-based and incredibly interactive, making after-school learning fun rather than a chore. Sign up today!

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5 Ways to Keep Homeschool Enthusiasm Going https://www.time4learning.com/blog/experienced-homeschooler/5-ways-to-keep-homeschool-enthusiasm-going/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/experienced-homeschooler/5-ways-to-keep-homeschool-enthusiasm-going/#respond Thu, 11 Oct 2018 12:00:36 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=18446 The Cambridge Dictionary defines enthusiasm as: “A feeling of energetic interest in a particular subject or activity and a desire to be involved in it, or a subject that produces such a feeling.” As a homeschooler, you have an “energetic interest” in your child’s education. You’ve decided to homeschool for a reason, and now that […]]]>

The Cambridge Dictionary defines enthusiasm as: “A feeling of energetic interest in a particular subject or activity and a desire to be involved in it, or a subject that produces such a feeling.” As a homeschooler, you have an “energetic interest” in your child’s education.

You’ve decided to homeschool for a reason, and now that you made that decision, you want to give 100 percent…always. But sometimes, that’s easier said than done.

The Power of Enthusiasm

You’ve witnessed enthusiasm before: Parents rooting for their children during a sporting event, fans screaming for their favorite team, and teachers passionately conveying their message on a subject. And those who feel that enthusiasm and witness its genuine power, feed off it.

You can harness the same power that enthusiasm possesses in your everyday homeschool classroom. It’s just a matter of believing in what you’re doing and how important your time with your children really is during the school year. Once you convey your passion and show your children how enthusiastic you are about teaching them, they will also become enthusiastic. It’s a natural occurrence.

Once you get the enthusiasm ball rolling though, it’s not always easy to keep it going. Even the most veteran homeschoolers experience burnout some time during the homeschool year.

Fire it Up

The constant pressure that many homeschooling parents put on themselves makes the days feel like a daily grind. This is natural, but there are ways you can avoid it. Use these tips and keep the atmosphere in your house exciting and inspiring.

  • Don’t Compare – People have a bad habit of comparing themselves with others. Ellen, a homeschool mom for two years, started comparing her daughter and her own homeschooling techniques with other families. It impacted their homeschooling experience in a negative way.

    “When I first joined a homeschool group, I couldn’t help but notice how much better the other homeschooling moms were doing with their children. I even became disappointed in my own daughter’s performance. It really got me down, and my daughter noticed my bad moods. After confiding with a friend who was an experienced homeschooler, she told me that you can’t compare yourself with others. Every family has different reasons for homeschooling and has different teaching techniques. The ones that work best for you, are the right ones – not the ones that seem to work for others. I started believing in myself again and praised my daughter for what she did best. I looked at the good things and focused on improving what I could do better.”
  • Keep Realistic Goals – Including your children once you begin the goal setting process will help them better understand what goals are and what’s expected of them throughout the school year. Many homeschoolers keep each child’s goals posted in a place that is convenient to access, such as on a whiteboard or taped to the refrigerator.

    Once you decide on your goals, figure out what steps you and your children will take to make these goals attainable. But remember, as the school year progresses, the steps may change, and that’s okay. As your children make steps toward attaining their goals, praise their successes and if some failures or challenges occur, speak with them about how they can best meet and defeat these challenges in the future. They will feed off your positive energy and your encouragement.
  • Make a Checklist of What Works for Your Family – Each child is different. What inspires and makes your children enthusiastic may not be the same as other children.

    Once you notice and record what works for your children, you can effectively keep the burnout blues to a minimum. For example, if you noticed in the past that your child became tired or lazy after reading basic textbooks for a while and then watched them rebound after using online, interactive lessons, make a note of it.
  • Talk With Other Families – Sharing ideas and thoughts with other homeschoolers almost always creates new teaching methods and fun activities. Emily homeschools three children and she noticed when one child was down in the dumps, the others sometimes experienced the same mood swing. She spoke with a friend who also had three children and received some great advice.

    “My friend told me that she let one of her children suggest a fun activity. She took turns and each child got a chance once a week. They loved having the power to choose and looked forward to it each week. Some suggestions included making a homemade pizza, playing hide and go seek outside, and painting a chair that she let her children doodle on and paint different colors.”
  • Remember Why You Chose Homeschooling – Every parent chose to homeschool for their own reasons. Regardless, the choice was made because it was the best option for their child’s education.

    Homeschooling really does allow you to bond with your children in a way that traditional schooling just can’t. When you find yourself in a funk, just think back at all the wonderful times you’ve shared with your children. It will help perk you up and may even put a smile on your face.

Every Day Won’t Be Perfect

Let’s face it, some days just won’t go your way. You’re not superhuman with the powers to make everyday a perfect success.

When things aren’t going well or don’t feel right, the best strategy is identifying the problem (or problems) and then making a game plan. If you or your children are sick, take a break. Maybe you changed the curriculum or are starting a new schedule. If so, give it some time or make a few adjustments. Some homeschoolers stop the regular lessons and do a unit study on a fun, educational topic.

Every new and veteran homeschooler go through bad days. So, don’t beat yourself up or get depressed about it. It’s how you bounce back that counts.

If despite all your best efforts, nothing is working, consider Time4Learning. Our online, award-winning curriculum can be the solution that brings life back to your homeschool. We offer a fun and interactive approach to learning that allows students to work at their own pace, on their own time. Check out our demos to see our lessons in action.

Sign up for our newsletter to get regular insights and practical advice about homeschooling, skill-building, and after-school enrichment.

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Homeschooling Strategies in 10 Minutes https://www.time4learning.com/blog/experienced-homeschooler/homeschooling-strategies-in-10-minutes/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/experienced-homeschooler/homeschooling-strategies-in-10-minutes/#respond Thu, 04 Oct 2018 12:00:12 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=18236 Homeschooling can be a tough task; keeping my students engaged and motivated to complete school work is especially difficult. How do you prevent school from becoming a chore students can’t wait to finish? Here’s 10 homeschooling tips that help me keep my own students engaged. You can apply one of these tips in just about […]]]>

Homeschooling can be a tough task; keeping my students engaged and motivated to complete school work is especially difficult. How do you prevent school from becoming a chore students can’t wait to finish?

Here’s 10 homeschooling tips that help me keep my own students engaged. You can apply one of these tips in just about 10 minutes and make a big difference in your homeschool!

  1. Allow Freedom
    Flexibility is essential in homeschooling and to be honest, one of the many reasons why we started homeschooling. My children are not fond of strict schedules, they easily get frustrated. While I do have a set routine I typically like to follow, I allow some breathing room in the daily schedule to allow freedom which allows my children to feel comfortable and not pressured while learning.
  2. Games and Hands-On Activities
    Learning can be fun. My children enjoy learning through hands-on activities and games. We find fun ways to address my students’ weaknesses and reinforce our lessons with a fun activity that allows us to create memories while developing engagement. Some of our favorites have been building a birdhouse in the geometry class to get a handle on measurements and angles and fun card games to enhance their reading skills.
  3. Involvement
    Involvement in your student’s homeschool will create motivation since some school subjects can be dull and boring when done alone. What do we do to spruce up our homeschool? We joined a co-op group! Every other Tuesday, we conduct science experiments. My students are excited to work amongst their friends while learning and I get excited because, well, my house isn’t the one getting dirty! I’ve seen a huge difference in motivation from my kiddos since we joined. I highly recommend joining a co-op as it will help increase the enjoyment and remove gloomy prospects from those lonely experiments.
  4. Interruptions
    If interruptions are not limited, then studies will be. My children are easily distracted and struggle to discipline themselves. Our number one homeschool rule is that no one is allowed to play with their electronics, unless we are using Time4Learning, until all their school work is completed. I do allow brief interruptions, but I certainly contain them. Only within the balance between freedom and discipline will homeschooling function properly.
  5. Gear Subjects Towards Your Student’s Passion
    Allow students to lead their own education. Observe their strengths and passions, then develop courses around their talents. My oldest loves to cook, so we do a lot of learning in the kitchen. Reading ingredients, following directions, and measuring just to name a few. My youngest is fascinated with engineering, so together (with some help from dad) we built a remote control car. We also wrote essays about the operations of machines for English, and studied the development of these discoveries through history. Two key tips for my homeschooling moms out there: Refrain from demanding students to fit into an expected learning style. Instead, develop subjects uniquely just for them.
  6. Set a Good Example
    People often mirror the actions and attitudes of those around them. If you display expectations for your students through your actions, they will be encouraged to perform similarly. Are you willing to try new learning games? Do you research things you don’t know? Are you enthusiastic about school? It is impossible to expect these attitudes from students who never see them displayed. From one homeschooling mom to another, take this homeschooling advice and show your students how to be excited about learning.
  7. Consistency
    Consistency allows for clear, predictable schedules, expectations, and responsibility. A non-constricting daily routine enables students to act responsibly when they know what to expect and understand their role. We always start our day off, at the kitchen table,to discuss what needs to be accomplished that specific day, so my students have a clear understanding of my expectations. Like I mentioned previously, schedules can become overbearing. Consistency is a wonderful tool until it becomes too controlling and stressful.
  8. Real Life Connections
    Subjects that seem meaningless in real life are very unmotivating to complete. Thus, to engage my kids in undesired subjects, I find ways to connect our homeschool studies with reality and complete experiments that display the subject’s value.
    Here are some ideas:

    • Visit nearby battlefields from wars studied in their history lessons.
    • Discover living creatures in nature to spruce up your online biology curriculum.
    • Complete math-applied experiments, like building furniture or baking.
    • In English, learn how to write letters, articles, ads, how-to papers, etc.
  9. Be Your Student’s Partner
    Partner with your students, and focus on tackling education alongside them. I always assure my kids have my support and am always willing to work with them whatever the case may be. Guide your student and provide learning opportunities. Your faithful support will encourage them and your partnership will motivate them.
  10. Keep It Simple
    In my 10+ years of homeschooling, I’ve learned that over complicating your homeschool and pressuring your child will only develop stress and frustration. Focus on learning and working on keeping education simple. It is important you understand what you are doing, but also important to relax. Learn to teach at your student’s pace and enjoyment. Design your homeschool specifically for your student and make learning fun and enjoyable for all.

Teach students to love learning using these homeschooling tips and tricks. If you’ve got tips that work for you and your homeschool students we love for you to share them in the comments below!

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West Virginia Field Trips for Homeschoolers https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/west-virginia-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/west-virginia-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/#respond Thu, 04 Oct 2018 11:30:09 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=18539 There is no shortage of natural beauty in the Mountain State. With tons of rich history, scenic mountains, rolling hills and endless recreational activities, homeschoolers have never-ending options for educational field trip ideas in West Virginia. Below are several ideas to enhance your child’s learning in the Mountain State broken down by geographical area. To […]]]>

There is no shortage of natural beauty in the Mountain State. With tons of rich history, scenic mountains, rolling hills and endless recreational activities, homeschoolers have never-ending options for educational field trip ideas in West Virginia.

Below are several ideas to enhance your child’s learning in the Mountain State broken down by geographical area. To start planning your adventures, use this printable map of West Virginia.

You’ll also find free Time4Learning lesson plans that you can download at the end of this post to help supplement your fun field trips in West Virginia.

Home education is not the same in every state. Make sure you’re getting the information you need to start homeschooling in the Mountain State.

Homeschool in WV Now!

Homeschool Field Trips in the Ohio River Valley, WV

Ohio River Valley WV Field Trips
  • Grave Creek Mound Historical Site, Moundsville, WV – Built by the Adena, a Native American culture, this burial mound is one of the largest in the U.S. and stands 63 feet tall, and 240 around. Visitors can also visit the Delf Norona Museum that first opened in 1978 to learn more about the Adena people through exhibits and displays. Groups can book interpretive lectures as well as partake in hands-on programs.
  • Olgebay Good Zoo, Wheeling, WV – This 30-acre zoo is home to more than 50 species of animals including meerkats, river otters, lemurs, and more. A one and a half mile train ride gives visitors a unique view of the zoo. A homeschool program is available for families, as well as a teen volunteer program, painting classes, and more.
  • Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, WV – First opened in 1952, this museum is the largest art museum in the state. Visitors can view various art collections including American, European, and Asian art, Haitian paintings and sculptures, a glass collection, and more. Program are available for children as well as teens.

Homeschool Field Trips in Allegheny Plateau, WV

Allegheny Plateau WV Field Trips
  • Clay Center for the Arts & Science of West Virginia, Charleston, WV – Opened in 2003, this 240,000 square foot facility houses an art museum, discovery museum, and a performing arts center. Families can take part in educational programs and workshops at the art museum, numerous hands-on exhibits at the discovery museum, and a number of shows, special events, and concerts at the performance hall.
  • Beckley Exhibition Coal Mine, Beckley, WV – Although initially opened in the late 19th century as a drift mine, this mine first opened to the public in 1962. Visitors can tour the underground mine and learn firsthand from former miners, explore numerous hands-on exhibits, and check out numerous coal camp buildings nearby.
  • Stonewall Jackson Lake State Park, Roanok, WV – For those families looking to get in their physical education, this park offers tons of options. Homeschoolers can swim, bike or hike the various trails available that range from one mile to just over three miles. Visitors can also play mini golf, try the indoor rock climbing wall, and more.

Homeschool Field Trips in Allegheny Highlands, WV

Allegheny Highlands WV Field Trips
  • Lost World Caverns, Lewisburg, WV – Explore the stalagmites and stalactites as you head underground at these caverns discovered in 1942. Visitors can take a self-guided tour or opt for a guided tour where they can view many of the cave’s formations such as Snowy Chandelier, Ice Cream Wall, and more.
  • Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge, Davis, WV – For families studying science or nature, this wildlife refuge offers tons of learning opportunities such as wildlife viewing, photography, and more. Nature-themed storytime as well as several interpretive and environmental education programs are available for students.
  • Green Bank Observatory, Green Bank, WV – Located in an area known as the National Radio Quiet Zone and home to the world’s largest radio telescope, this observatory offers tons of learning opportunities for homeschoolers. Visitors can take a guided tour of the 25,000 square foot science center, explore the hands-on exhibit hall, and more.
  • Blackwater Falls State Park, Davis, WV – Visitors to this park can take advantage of the trails that offer picturesque views of the surround area as well as the various falls, including the main attraction, Blackwater Falls. The 62-foot cascade is one of the most photographed places in West Virginia.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Potomac Section, WV

Potomac Section WV Field Trips
  • The John Brown Wax Museum, Harpers Ferry, WV – Families can enhance their social studies curriculum by learning about abolitionist John Brown and his raid on Harpers Ferry. Over 80 life-size wax figures with voice and animation tell the story of how he planned to free slaves by inciting a revolt.
  • Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, WV – Visitors can explore this historic community that includes numerous exhibits, museums, ranger programs, and more. Guided tours and talks are available on a number of topics, as well as hikes and living history programs.
  • Potomac Eagle Scenic Railroad, Romney, WV – Take a scenic ride on this heritage railroad that gives passengers views of the mountains, pastures, as well as the South Branch Valley of the Potomac River where many bald eagles make their home. Operating since 1991, the railroad offers various excursions and special events throughout the year.
  • Seneca Caverns, Riverton, WV – Discovered in 1742 and opened to the public in 1930, these limestone caverns were one used by Seneca Indians for shelter, ceremonies, and more. Homeschoolers can go on a cave tour to explore the geological formations or take part in gemstone mining where visitors can take home their findings.

WV Field Trips Unit Study Suppl.

Is there anything more fun than learning through field trips? To make your experiences at these destinations even more meaningful, Time4Learning members will appreciate this download of free activity tie-ins.

Download

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How to Boost Your Homeschool Enthusiasm https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/how-to-boost-your-homeschool-enthusiasm/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/how-to-boost-your-homeschool-enthusiasm/#respond Mon, 01 Oct 2018 12:00:18 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=18515 Many children become bored very easily. Even adults can get bored if they’re doing the same old routine every day. When this happens, it’s important to harness the power of enthusiasm. Afterall, enthusiasm is contagious. In an article on enthusiasm in the Washington Post, career coach Joyce E. A. Russell states, “Have passion and find […]]]>

Many children become bored very easily. Even adults can get bored if they’re doing the same old routine every day. When this happens, it’s important to harness the power of enthusiasm. Afterall, enthusiasm is contagious.

In an article on enthusiasm in the Washington Post, career coach Joyce E. A. Russell states, “Have passion and find inspiration for what you are doing. What’s the purpose for it? How does it help you or anyone else? Passion is critical to keep you excited about your work and to keep your enthusiasm high, even during stressful times. If you’re not passionate for your work, why would anyone around you (e.g., customers, direct reports, etc.) be interested in it?”

You have the passion and you know your purpose for homeschooling your children. Your purpose may differ from other homeschoolers, but that doesn’t matter. Once you convey your passion and show your children how enthusiastic you are about teaching them, they will also become enthusiastic.

Go Ahead, Mix Things Up!

As the adage states, nothing worthwhile comes easy. Your homeschool enthusiasm will wane at times. As you become more experienced at homeschooling, you’ll discover that you don’t have to follow the same routine. There are no strict rules or schedules you must follow.

Long time homeschooler Kelly Anne, who homeschools her two children ages 8 and 13, says, “I start out the school year enthusiastic and it rubs off on my children. But at times I get tired and a bit stressed. They feel that and almost mimic my moods. So, I try to mix things up to inspire them and get my motivation back.”

Try these tips to boost everyone’s homeschool enthusiasm:

  • Hands-On Activities – Children of all ages enjoy hands-on activities and the ideas are nearly endless. Just find out what interests your children, use your imagination and begin. Emily homeschools her eight-year-old daughter and recently discovered that she loves the piano. “I bought a cheap used electric piano. I sit with my daughter and learn easy notes and songs, such as “Mary Had a Little Lamb”. This not only teachers her a skill she can use for the rest of her life, but it also teaches her about timing and rhythm, and keeps her brain active. We love it.”

    Other exciting hands-on activities include building model cars, building diagrams, learning to use a camera, crafting, etc.

  • Day/Field Trips – Who doesn’t like a field trip? Many parents remember them fondly, not to mention that field trips offer a great opportunity to teach your children about many things. For example, you can take a trip to the beach or local lake and collect rocks, plants, soil/sand, etc. You can bring the samples home and look them up to learn more.

    You can also visit museums, join homeschool groups on day trips, or ask a local business if you can visit their establishment and learn about what they do and how they serve the community. Once you walk out of the house, the world is one big learning opportunity.

  • Switching Up the Schedule – Remember when we said homeschooling is flexible? It’s true. You don’t have to follow one strict schedule. Although some children (and parents) thrive on a set schedule, but if you find that your daily routine has lost its luster and your enthusiasm is suffering from it, try mixing things up. Melanie, a homeschooler of two children, found that they were losing concentration after lunch. “After my children ate their meals, they become tired and lackadaisical. And that’s when I had the math courses set up on my schedule. So, I moved math to the morning after they finished their chores and rescheduled art and science lab for the afternoon. I found that these active courses kept them more alert.”

    You can be as subtle or drastic as you want. Some parents find that their children learn better after dinner or in the evening. There is no perfect schedule that’s set in stone. The schedule that works for you and your family is the right schedule.

  • Make Your Curriculum More Eclectic – The goal of eclectic homeschooling is to create a specialized educational experience for each child based on their strengths, learning styles, and interests. For example, some children enjoy learning with books while others prefer online activities. By creating a mix of activities, you find balance.

    An eclectic approach may include a combination of online learning courses, workbooks and textbooks, courses at local schools, mentors and tutors, and various other curricula. It’s a winning medley or recipe that matches your child’s needs.

  • Project-based Learning – Project-based learning (PBL) joins real-life experiences with school work. PBL encourages children to take the initiative, respond to a situation, investigate pertinent information, communicate with their team, and solve any conflicts that pop up as they advance the project to its conclusion. You could build a family budget, which teaches your children about math and personal finances, or have them arrange a large party that consists of planning the meal, buying the groceries, cooking the meal and creating invitations for the guests. This teaches them about finances, organization, and much more.

    Remember, think about your child’s interests and keep their learning styles in mind when choosing a project. This will keep them more enthusiastic as the project progresses.

  • Utilize Your Child’s Input – Meeting with your child to see if they are enjoying and engaged in their education is important. You should at least have monthly sit-downs to discuss the curriculum, courses, and schedule. Each child is different, but many parents find that including their children in the educational process lets them feel empowered and more confident.

    As your children grow older, start brainstorming with them about their schooling. Don’t try to do this on your own. Remember, your children are a part of the process, too. They want to be heard and be a part of the decision making.That doesn’t mean that they must make all the decisions, but including their ideas certainly will make your job easier.

  • Use Your Imagination – What’s really cool about homeschooling is that you can pick out creative electives. Meet with your children and find out what they’d like to study and learn. You might be amazed. Sheila homeschools her 12-year-old and she couldn’t believe her son’s response when she asked him about electives. “My son said he wanted to build his own fishing poles. I knew he liked to fish but I never knew he was interested in building his own custom pole. Heck, I didn’t even know that it was possible. I thought is was done on an assembly line or something. But he told me about fishing pole building kits you could buy. He recently caught a fish for the first time with a pole that he constructed. I was so happy for him and he was so proud!”

    Other creative electives include cooking, sewing, animal care, web design, and theater.

Don’t Forget to Have Fun

Your passion for your children’s educational experience will create an enthusiastic atmosphere as you progress through your homeschool journey. There will be tough days, but you can most certainly keep your enthusiasm levels high by using these tips. Recharge your batteries when you sense that it’s time, and remember your purpose. Give it your all and always enjoy the wonderful times with your children.

If despite all your best efforts, nothing is working, consider Time4Learning. Our online, award-winning curriculum can be the solution that brings life back to your homeschool. We offer a fun and interactive approach to learning that allows students to work at their own pace, on their own time. Check out our demos to see our lessons in action.

Sign up for our newsletter to get regular insights and practical advice about homeschooling, skill-building, and after-school enrichment.

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Unit Study Supplement: Wisconsin State Facts, U.S. 30th State https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-wisconsin-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/unit-study-supplement-wisconsin-state-facts/#respond Thu, 27 Sep 2018 12:00:42 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=15681 Located in the north-central portion of the country, Wisconsin is one of 13 states that makes up the Midwestern U.S. As one of the leading producers of dairy in the U.S., particularly cheese, it’s no wonder Wisconsin is known as “America’s Dairyland”, or that residents are sometimes referred to as cheeseheads. This is part of […]]]>

Located in the north-central portion of the country, Wisconsin is one of 13 states that makes up the Midwestern U.S. As one of the leading producers of dairy in the U.S., particularly cheese, it’s no wonder Wisconsin is known as “America’s Dairyland”, or that residents are sometimes referred to as cheeseheads.

This is part of Time4Learning’s series of United States unit study supplements, where your homeschooler can learn about each state with tons of information including historical and geographical facts, educational activities, field trip ideas, and more. Learning about the Badger State is fun with our dedicated unit study supplement all about Wisconsin. Through fun facts like these, your student will be able to become more familiar with the state. You can also download our list of PreK-12 interactive activities that align with your study of interesting facts about Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Fast Facts

Became a State May 29, 1848
Order it Joined the Union 30th state
State Capital Madison
State Abbreviation WI
Border States
State Flag Wisconsin State Flag
State Song On, Wisconsin!
State Flower Wood Violet
State Nicknames
  • The Badger State
Notable Wisconsinites
  • Gene Wilder, actor
  • Georgia O’Keefe, artist
  • William H. Rehnquist, Supreme Court Justice
  • Laura Ingalls Wilder, writer
  • Frank Lloyd Wright, architect
  • Thornton Wilder, playwright
  • Liberace, pianist
  • Al Molinaro, actor

Historical Facts About Wisconsin

Just like most states in America, Wisconsin was first inhabited years ago by Native American tribes. The Chippewa, Menominee, Oneida, Potawatomi, and Winnebago tribes were all inhabiting Wisconsin until the arrival of European settlers. The first settler was a Frenchman by the name Jean Nicolet, who arrived in 1634.

At the time of Jean Nicolet’s exploration of Wisconsin, he found lots of beaver furs. This led to interest in Wisconsin as a location for fur trading, and more Europeans began to go to Wisconsin. The land was eventually claimed for France by Jean Nicolet in 1689. However, the British began to visit Wisconsin, causing conflict between the French and English.

In 1754, during the French and Indian war, France and Britain began fighting over ownership of the land. Britain won and claimed Wisconsin as their own in 1763. Approximately 20 years later, after General George Washington won the Revolutionary war, Wisconsin became part of the lands owned by the U.S. However, this land remained undeveloped until many years later.

In the 1820s, explorers found lead ore in the land that would become Wisconsin, and settlers moved in. At this time, there were still Native Americans living on that land, which led to the Black Hawk war in an attempt to remove the Native Americans from the land. The explorers were successful and claimed the land in 1832.

Just 4 years later, the Wisconsin Territory was created by the U.S. Congress and began to grow, run mostly by farmers. Wisconsin officially was added to the Union in 1848, during James K. Polk’s presidency Wisconsin was truly developed and became industrialized during the Civil War, and remained a member of the Union.

10,000 B.C.

Burial mounds were built by Native Americans to mourn the dead. The mounds are still visible today.

1630

Native Americans lived in domed shelters called “Wigwams,” made of wooden poles, bark, and grass

1634

Jean Nicolet was the first explorer to set foot in Wisconsin. He was looking for a Northwest Passage to China

1689

Wisconsin becomes known as a trading post for furs, and the land was claimed by Jean Nicolet for France

1754

British and French began to fight over ownership of Wisconsin, during the French and Indian War. Native Americans fought on both sides, some supporting the British while other supported the French.

1763

The British won ownership over Wisconsin

1788

The United States owned Wisconsin and the rest of the Northwest Territory, after the Revolutionary War. The English still partially inhabited the land.

1812

Americans finally defeated the Europeans and kicked them out of the Northwest Territory once and for all.

1820

Lead ore became popular and helped to increase development and economy. The settlers removed the Native Americans while looking for more ore. The state received the nickname “the Badger State” because the way miners made holes and slept in them while looking for lead is just like how badgers burrow.

1832

The Black Hawk War occurred because the Fox and Sauk tribes tried to move back to Wisconsin. It got its name because the tribes at war were under the command of Chief Black Hawk. They were defeated in the Battle of Bad Axe. During the Black Hawk War, Abraham Lincoln was a member of the U.S. Army fighting against the tribes.

1836

Wisconsin territory was created by the U.S. Congress

1841

Developed the first cheese-making factory in 1841. They love their cheese so much that there’s even a cheese museum that creates a 90lb wheel of cheese every year.

1848

Wisconsin was admitted to the Union

1865

The Civil War did not have any major battles in Wisconsin, but the state did send over 90,000 soldiers to fight for the Union. Wisconsin became industrialized and developed at this time.

1919

The Green Bay Packers football team is established

Bring history and geography to life with Time4Learning’s interactive online social studies curriculum for grades 2-12.

Geographical Facts About Wisconsin

Can your homeschooler locate Wisconsin on this printable U.S. map? Wisconsin got its name because of the large river that runs through the state – it means red stone river. This great river eventually connects with the famous Mississippi River, and this connection was used during European exploration. These are just some of the interesting facts about the Badger State’s geography that your homeschooler will find interesting.

To enhance your unit study supplement, explore a map of the state, then download our printable Wisconsin map below and mark it up with your child. Here are some facts you and your homeschooler may want to note about Wisconsin’s geography and unique features.

  • The highest point is Timms Hill, which is 1,951 ft; Lake Michigan is the lowest point.
  • Wisconsin is made up of 72 counties.
  • The largest city is Milwaukee, with a population of approximately 595,000. It is in the southeast portion of the state, located on Lake Michigan.
  • Madison is located in the southern part of Wisconsin, about 50 miles from the Wisconsin-Illinois border. Belmont, the original capital, is about 50 miles southwest of Madison, and Milwaukee is 80 miles directly east.
  • Wisconsin is known for its farmland because of the rich soil left by the glaciers that cut the tops off of hills. There are also over 15,000 lakes because of the ice age!
  • Wisconsin is actually the Swiss Cheese Capital of the World.
  • Sheboygan, which is 100 miles northeast of Madison, is the Bratwurst Capital of the World. There is also the World’s Largest Brat Fest, which takes place in Madison every Memorial Day weekend.
  • The oldest city in Wisconsin is Green Bay, which is 140 miles northeast of Madison. It was established when Jean Nicolet started a fur trading post in 1634.
  • Lake Michigan borders Wisconsin to the east.
  • The Central Plain is a U-shaped, which borders with states Michigan and Minnesota.

Wisconsin State Map

Download our FREE Wisconsin state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download Map of Wisconsin

Activities for Children in Wisconsin

Whether you homeschool in the state of Wisconsin or are just visiting, below is a list of field trip ideas that will help supplement the Wisconsin facts unit study. You’ll find everything from art and science museums to outdoor activities in national parks.

  • Milwaukee Art Museum (Milwaukee) – With a collection of over 25,000 works of art, this museum is one of the largest in the country. Established in 1882, the art museum offers various educational programs, youth studio classes, and summer camps. Admission for Kids 12 & under is free.
  • Apostle Islands National Lakeshore (Bayfield) – Located on the northern tip of the state on Lake Superior, this recreational park features 21 islands, lighthouses and caves to explore. Visitors can hike, camp, kayak. Guided activities include lighthouse tours, campfire programs, and more.
  • Discovery World (Milwaukee) – This science and technology center museum features over a dozen interactive exhibits that include the Reiman Aquarium, Simple Machine Shipyard, Clean Air Trek, and more. The museum also offers interactive tours, lab experiences, and homeschool days.
  • Ice Age National Scenic Trail (Eagle) – Stretching 1,200 miles across the state and tracing a huge glacier that once covered much of North America, this park offer endless indoor and outdoor activities. The park’s western end is located in Polk County and on the eastern end in Door County. Families can hike, birdwatch, camp, stargaze, visit the interpretive centers, and more.

Wisconsin Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Aquanut Water Shows (Twin Lakes) – Take in some impressive stunts by water skiers at these free shows that take place every Wednesday and Sunday at Lance Park.
  • Jelly Belly Factory Tour (Pleasant Prairie) – Who doesn’t want to take a free ride on the Jelly Belly express train? Take a free warehouse tour (offered daily) and learn how these sweet treats are made. Be sure to stop at the interactive Jelly Belly Station for fun games, samples, and more.
  • Wisconsin Veterans Museum (Madison) – Established in 1901, this museum and research center is dedicated to the veterans and soldiers of Wisconsin. The museum features rotating exhibits, as well as various programs and events for students of all ages.
  • Iron River National Fish Hatchery (Iron River) – Established in 1979, families can learn more about fish conservation at this hatchery that also features an informative visitor center and several aquariums. The hatchery’s 1,200 acres also provides a trail system for visitors to explore.

Wisconsin Learning Games for Children

Learn even more about the Badger State and test your child’s knowledge about Wisconsin facts with these free learning resources.

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Math Strategies for Autistic Students https://www.time4learning.com/blog/special-needsgifted/math-strategies-for-autistic-students/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/special-needsgifted/math-strategies-for-autistic-students/#respond Mon, 24 Sep 2018 12:00:19 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=18229 When it comes to homeschooling, there are certain subjects that parents just don’t feel comfortable teaching. At the top of the list, you’ll usually find math. When it comes to autism and math skills, some students are highly gifted. There are others who can memorize certain facts but are unable to apply the information when […]]]>

When it comes to homeschooling, there are certain subjects that parents just don’t feel comfortable teaching. At the top of the list, you’ll usually find math.

When it comes to autism and math skills, some students are highly gifted. There are others who can memorize certain facts but are unable to apply the information when solving problems and equations. Since there are various autism spectrum disorders, it’s important to consider the child’s current academic abilities as well as their communication, social and behavioral skills when selecting the ideal math curriculum for autistic students.

Below are a few math strategies for autistic students that can help parents successfully teach the subject and keep their children engaged in the process.

Visual Aids

Math is one of those topics in which doing is the best way to learn. If your child is young and just learning the numbers or simple addition and subtraction, you may want to use small toys or their favorite snacks to add and subtract. Math counters are a great tool to teach students to add, subtract, and count. An abacus is also a useful item that helps them perform calculations and overcome their math difficulties. These manipulatives are also great for students who are prone to fidget.

One Step at a Time

When teaching math to students with autism, it’s important to make sure they have basic speech skills first so they can understand commands and directions. Don’t overwhelm your child with everything they need to do at once. For students with autism who struggle with communication skills, it is best to provide step by step, simple-to-follow verbal directions. In addition, make sure to give your child ample time to complete one step before moving on to the next. For students who may not be able to communicate verbally, you can also show them what to do first so they can then mirror what you did.

Write it Out

If your child is still working on their fine motor skills, holding a pencil might be a challenge. Having your child trace numbers into the air is a good start. You can also have your child work on a computer or tablet since it may be easier for them to use a keyboard and/or touch screen. For students who have developed their fine motor skills, a small whiteboard and dry erase marker are perfect for learning to count and writing equations.

Printable Math Worksheets

Looking for more ways to introduce math into your homeschool? Download this printable math packet for K-12 students and start practicing or advancing your math skills today.

Start Practicing Now!

Make a Plan

For many students with autism, following a routine helps them feel at ease since they know what to expect. Whether it’s doing math after breakfast or before recess, doing so at the same time each day allows them to mentally prepare. It can also help to start math the same way each time. This can be by singing a particular song or starting each lesson by sitting on a special rug.

Let’s Play

Math games for autistic students can be very effective, especially when the subject isn’t exactly their favorite. Whether in person, or online, playing games can help your child associate math with fun, thereby increasing their interest. You can try apps, an online curriculum, or even card games/flash cards. You can also try incorporating something your child likes or brings them comfort, perhaps a particular toy or a special blanket.

You Did It

Be sure to give your child praise when they learn a new skill or get a correct answer. This helps motivate students and will help them associate math with good, positive feelings. Remember that for some children with autism, facial expressions and other non-verbal cues are difficult to understand, so be sure you use straightforward, direct language when expressing what a great job they did.

If your child tends to become overstimulated, be sure to choose a teaching environment that is quiet, free of distractions and clutter. Keep in mind that lighting can also play a role in a student’s comfort level, so whether you have to open windows or dim the lights, do what works best for your child. If you find that your child is not interested despite your best efforts, it may be possible that what you are teaching them may not be challenging enough.

Lastly, don’t forget to take breaks when you notice that your child is losing interest or becoming frustrated. Setting up a sensory station can be the perfect way for your child to relax. Remember, these are special memories you are making with your child as you both learn new things together.

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