state unit study – Time4Learning https://www.time4learning.com Homeschool, Afterschool, Skill Building Mon, 15 Jan 2018 16:31:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 Homeschool Unit Study: Connecticut State Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-connecticut-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-connecticut-state-facts/#respond Tue, 09 Jan 2018 13:30:57 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11787 On January 9, 1788, Connecticut became the fifth of the original colonies to join the United States, and we’ve prepared you this homeschool unit study just in time for Connecticut’s anniversary. Whether you live in Connecticut or are simply interested in the “Constitution State,” we’ve collected information about its history and geography for you to […]]]>

On January 9, 1788, Connecticut became the fifth of the original colonies to join the United States, and we’ve prepared you this homeschool unit study just in time for Connecticut’s anniversary. Whether you live in Connecticut or are simply interested in the “Constitution State,” we’ve collected information about its history and geography for you to use as part of your homeschool state unit study. You’ll also find educational destinations in CT, perfect for planning field trips with your homeschoolers. Once you’ve studied all the interesting facts about Connecticut, put your homeschooler to the test with fun learning games and other activities about the Nutmeg state. Combine this unit study with the unit studies about the different states to teach your homeschooler the rich history of our country. Are you ready to find out what important reference book was first published in Connecticut? Want to know how many miles of river wind through the state? Then let’s get started learning!

Connecticut Fast Facts

Became a Colony 1636
Became a State 1788
State Capital Hartford
State Abbreviation CT
Border States
  • New York
  • Massachusetts
  • Rhode Island
State Flag Connecticut State Flag
State Song Yankee Doodle
State Nicknames
  • The Constitution State
  • The Nutmeg State
Notable People from Connecticut
  • Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin
  • Katharine Hepburn, actress
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe, abolitionist
  • George W. Bush, 43rd president of the U.S.
  • Nathan Hale, Revolutionary War hero
  • J.P. Morgan, entrepreneur
  • Noah Webster, journalist

Historical Facts About Connecticut

The word Connecticut is derived from a word that the Mohegan tribe had for the long, winding river that flowed through the area that is now Connecticut: “Quinnehtukqut.” For thousands of years, the Mohegan were the only inhabitants of the area until English Puritans created a settlement there. In 1636, it officially became a colony. Let’s discover some other interesting Connecticut colony facts.

  • The first European explorer to discover the Connecticut area was Dutchman Adriaen Block.
  • While under Dutch rule, the area was part of the Dutch colony called “New Netherland.”
  • From 1703 to 1875, the state had two different capitals: Hartford and New Haven. Hartford eventually became the single state capital.
  • In 1647, the colonists hanged Alse Young for the crime of witchcraft.
  • Chief trade and enterprise in the Connecticut Colony included whaling, fishing, shipbuilding, fur trading, timber production, and maple syrup.
  • The first medical diploma ever issued in the United States was at Yale University in CT in 1729.
  • It was the fifth colony to become a state on January 9, 1788.

But statehood was only the beginning for Connecticut. Here are some more Connecticut state facts your homeschoolers will be interested to learn.

  • Because of its structural government document of 1638/1639 called “The Fundamental Orders,” Connecticut got its nickname as “The Constitution State” for having the first formal state constitution in the Western world.
  • In 1806, Noah Webster published his first dictionary in the state.
  • Many abolitionists lived in CT during the anti-slavery movement of the 1800’s, including Harriet Beecher Stowe and John Brown.
  • The Hartford Courant, established in 1764, is the oldest continually published newspaper in the U.S.
  • In the 1920’s, Yale students discovered that empty pie tins from Mrs. Frisbie Pies in Bridgeport could be sailed across the campus lawns, giving rise to the game of “frisbee.”
  • The world’s first nuclear submarine was launched from CT in 1954.
  • Connecticut has no county government. There is state-level government and then city/town-level government.

Geographical Facts About Connecticut

While there are plenty of Connecticut facts for children that highlight the history of the state, you’ll want to make sure to cover important facts about Connecticut’s geography, too. Exploring a map of the state will help a lot, then download our printable Connecticut map and mark it up with your child! Here are just some of the things you may want to explore and mark on your map.

  • Connecticut is the third smallest state (after Rhode Island and Delaware)
  • The Connecticut River, the Thames River, and the Long Island Sound have been formative in the state’s long maritime history.
  • The state has a variety of geographical features including rolling mountains, river valleys, and beaches.
  • There are over 5,800 miles of river in the state of CT.
  • All three rock types are found in Connecticut: sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous.
  • If you are standing in Stamford, CT, you can travel north, south, east, or west, and the next state you will hit is New York.
  • Mt. Frissell, the highest point in Connecticut, is found in the northwestern corner of the state.
  • Geologists believe that Lake Hitchcock in CT formed over 15,000 years ago when a glacial ice melt dammed up part of the Connecticut River.
  • Ivy League University Yale, is located on the south part of this small state, in the city of New Haven, 40 miles south of the state’s capital Hartford!

Connecticut State Map

Download our FREE Connecticut state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Educational Places of Interest in Connecticut

One of the best ways to energize any state unit study is by adding hands-on activities. Do you live in Connecticut? Or perhaps you will be traveling to the state in the near future? Homeschooling families will discover plenty of interesting things in Connecticut that are perfect for field trips. Here are some ideas for day trips where you can experience Connecticut’s history and geography for yourself.

  • Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum (Ridgefield) — in addition to the chance to experience many forms of modern art, the museum offers educational programs specifically for families, including take-home projects.
  • Connecticut Children’s Museum (New Haven) — a giant learning playground for students. Homeschoolers will learn about everything from music to logic and mathematics to the natural world in the museum’s eight thematic rooms.
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe Center (Hartford) — visit Stowe’s historic home to learn about what inspired her to write Uncle Tom’s Cabin and to find out why her story is still relevant in today’s world.
  • Mystic Aquarium and Institute for Exploration (Mystic) — a place to interact with a wide variety of marine life including beluga whales, sea lions, and African penguins. The aquarium offers both formal and informal educational programs.
  • New Pond Farm Education Center (West Redding) — instead of a single field trip, this destination is designed for long-term membership. Members have year-round access to 102 acres of this small working farm with learning opportunities on everything from Native Americans to astronomy.

For additional field trip options in Connecticut, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s Connecticut Field Trips with Kids page.

Connecticut Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

Connecticut Learning Games for Children

Want to extend your Connecticut unit study even farther? The following learning resources will introduce you to even more fun facts about Connecticut and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

Get each Time4Learning Homeschool Unit Study sent straight to your inbox as soon as it is released!

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Homeschool Unit Study: Georgia State Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-georgia-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-georgia-state-facts/#respond Tue, 26 Dec 2017 13:00:46 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11801 Georgia, the southeastern state with the largest land mass and population, is sometimes called “The Empire State of the South.” It became part of the United States on January 2, 1788 — the 10th state to join. Let’s celebrate Georgia’s anniversary on January 2nd by learning more about this state’s history. Those pieces of Georgia’s […]]]>

Georgia, the southeastern state with the largest land mass and population, is sometimes called “The Empire State of the South.” It became part of the United States on January 2, 1788 — the 10th state to join. Let’s celebrate Georgia’s anniversary on January 2nd by learning more about this state’s history. Those pieces of Georgia’s state trivia, though, are only a glimpse at all the fun facts you’ll learn about in this post from our Time4Learning homeschool state unit studies.

Below, you will find information on Georgia’s colonial period, as well as fun facts about its history as a state. You will also get insights into the state’s geographical makeup. Don’t miss our lists of educational places to visit in the state, including some where you can get in free or at a discounted rate. Finally, you’ll definitely want to follow the links to learning games and printables that can enhance your state study. Don’t forget to view relevant lessons per grade level for this unit study. Let the learning begin!

Georgia Fast Facts

Became a Colony

1752

Became a State

1788

State Capital

Atlanta

State Abbreviation

GA

Border States
  • Alabama
  • Florida
  • South Carolina
  • North Carolina
  • Tennessee
State Flag Georgia State Flag
State Song

Georgia on My Mind

State Nicknames
  • Peach State
  • Empire State of the South
Notable Georgians
  • Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights activist
  • Julia Roberts, actress
  • Ray Charles, singer
  • Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the U.S.
  • Flannery O’Connor, author
  • Sonny Carter, NASA Astronaut
  • Bill Terry, baseball great
  • Ryan Seacrest, radio and tv personality

Historical Facts About Georgia

For much of Georgia’s pre-colonial period, the Creek Nation were the main inhabitants of the area. Even after the land was colonized, Creek Indians outnumbered European colonists until at least 1760. Georgia colony history begins late, in terms of colonial settlement. In fact, it was the last of the established English colonies in North America. Here are some other Georgia colony facts your homeschoolers will want to learn about.

  • The original purpose envisioned for the establishment of a colony in Georgia was for a place to keep English subjects who had been imprisoned for debtedness.
  • The colony was also designed to be a buffer between the southern British colonies and Spanish-controlled Florida.
  • The original European inhabitants settled in the area of what is now Savannah, GA.
  • After Britain’s victory in the French and Indian war, the boundaries of the Province of Georgia were expanded, making it the largest of the original 13 colonies.
  • King George II of England specified in the charter of Georgia that the colony should be named after him.
  • Washington, Georgia, established in 1780, was the first city in North America to be named after George Washington.
  • At the time of the American Revolution, there were already over 18,000 slaves owned in GA.

Following its ratification of the constitution and new beginnings as a state, Georgia experienced significant prosperity, in large part because of the invention of the cotton gin. Here are several more facts about Georgia that your homeschoolers will be interested to learn.

  • Georgia was the first state to create a state-supported university in 1785, named Franklin College (after Benjamin Franklin.)
  • It was also the site of the first full college for women in the country, established in 1836.
  • The only two Georgians to receive the Nobel Peace Prize are Jimmy Carter and Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • In 1861, Georgia seceded from the Union and became part of the Confederate States of America.
  • In 1886, pharmacist John Pemberton created a non-alcoholic version of the French wine coca, calling it Coca-Cola, and it was first sold in Atlanta.
  • The Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. was founded in Savannah, GA in 1912.
  • Atlanta-born minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., based his Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the state.

Geographical Facts About Georgia

While there are plenty of fun facts about Georgia that highlight the history of the state, you’ll want to make sure to cover important facts about Georgia geography, too. Exploring a map of the state will help a lot. Then download our printable Georgia map and mark it up with your child! Here are just some of the things you may want to explore and mark on your map.

  • Atlanta International Airport in central GA is the world’s busiest passenger airport.
  • Georgia is the largest state east of the Mississippi River.
  • Although known as the “Peach State,” Georgia is also the largest producer of peanuts and pecans in the United States.
  • Throughout its history, the state of Georgia has had five different capital cities, including Savannah, Augusta, Louisville, Milledgeville, and Atlanta. Can you locate and mark each of those on your map?
  • After Texas, Georgia has the next highest number of counties of any state, at 159.
  • South Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp in southeast Georgia is the largest swamp area in North America.
  • Stone Mountain, just east of Atlanta in central Georgia, is really not a mountain at all, but rather the largest single block of granite in the world.

Georgia State Map

Download our FREE Georgia state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Educational Places of Interest in Georgia

Homeschooling families know that there is no better way to get children engaged with their studies than with a field trip! Georgia has a wealth of places where children can study history, geography, and many other subjects for themselves. Here are some ideas for day trips where you can get hands-on with your learning and enhance your Georgia state unit study.

  • Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson (Augusta) — not only can you find out more about our 28th president at this destination, you will also learn about the succession of the south, the First World War, and the history of the Presbyterian church in the U.S.
  • Georgia Sea Turtle Center (Jekyll Island) — this working hospital for sea turtles allows visitors to observe feedings, meet the current patients, participate in educational programs, and take sunrise and evening turtle walks.
  • Interactive Neighborhood for Kids (Gainesville) — at this children’s museum, your homeschoolers can role play and imagine themselves as doctors and nurses, x-ray technologists, dentists, bankers, postal workers, grocery clerks, and more.
  • Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University (Atlanta) — educational destination for over 30,000 school children each year. Includes large collections of Egyptian, Near Eastern, and ancient American art and artifacts.
  • Tellus Science Museum (Cartersville) — began as a geological museum and has expanded to educate children and families about a multitude of science fields. Annual members have Lunch-n-Learn and Friday Night Science opportunities, too.

For additional field trip options in Georgia, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s Georgia Field Trips with Kids page.

Georgia Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Atlanta Botanical Garden (Atlanta) — Once a year, the Garden hosts a “Homeschool Day” where families can get up to $15 off normal admission prices and participate in homeschool-geared educational activities.
  • Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site (Atlanta)— Tour the place Dr. King was born and spent his childhood. You’ll also find three different museum halls dedicated to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement here. Entrance to all exhibits is FREE.
  • Mayfield Dairy Farm Tour (Braselton) — Discover the journey milk makes from the farm to the grocery store in this free company tour. Tours run every hour on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 9am to 5pm.
  • Museum of Aviation (Warner Robins) — Next to Robins Air Force Base is a facility that houses 85 historic U.S. Air Force aircraft, missiles, cockpits and award-winning exhibits and hosts numerous educational activities for children of all ages. Parking and admission at the museum are FREE.
  • Museum of History and Holocaust Education (Kennesaw) — On select Wednesdays throughout the school year, homeschoolers have an opportunity to participate in hands-on activities, listen to special speakers, take tours of the facility, and watch age-appropriate films, all for FREE.

Georgia Learning Games for Children

Want to extend your Georgia unit study even farther? The following learning resources will introduce you to even more fun facts about Georgia and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

Get each Time4Learning Homeschool Unit Study sent straight to your inbox as soon as it is released!

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Homeschool Unit Study: Fun Facts About New Jersey https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-unit-study-new-jersey-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-unit-study-new-jersey-state-facts/#respond Mon, 18 Dec 2017 12:00:19 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11730 Every year on December 18, the state of New Jersey celebrates its anniversary as part of the United States. It was the third state to ratify the constitution and become part of the newly founded country. But this is only one of the many interesting facts about New Jersey that your homeschoolers will find out […]]]>

Every year on December 18, the state of New Jersey celebrates its anniversary as part of the United States. It was the third state to ratify the constitution and become part of the newly founded country. But this is only one of the many interesting facts about New Jersey that your homeschoolers will find out in this unit study. We’ll be exploring the “Garden State” by pointing out some of the important historical facts about New Jersey, some New Jersey trivia that may surprise your students, and even some fun things for children to do in the state. You’ll also enjoy our collection of online New Jersey learning games which will challenge your homeschoolers to test what they’ve learned via interactive play.

This particular unit study can be used as part of your geography and/or history lessons, or just a neat supplement to your regular social studies teaching schedule. You may want to combine it with other Time4Learning homeschool state unit studies, as well.

Are you ready to learn more about this small state with a big history? Then let’s get this homeschool unit study started!

New Jersey Fast Facts

Became a Colony 1702
Became a State 1787
State Capital Trenton
State Abbreviation NJ
Border States
  • Delaware
  • New York
  • Pennsylvania
State Flag New Jersey State Flag
State Song New Jersey is the only state without a state song.
State Nicknames
  • The Garden State
Notable New Jerseyans
  • Frank Sinatra, singer
  • Grover Cleveland, 22nd and 24th president of the United States
  • Jerry Lewis, actor and comedian
  • Judy Blume, author
  • Albert Einstein, physicist
  • Alice Paul, civil rights and women’s rights advocate

New Jersey Historical Facts

The history of the New Jersey colony begins when the area was discovered by Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano. 1664 was when New Jersey was founded by the British. Until that time it was settled mostly by Dutch, Finnish, and Swedish colonists. Here are some additional New Jersey colony facts that homeschoolers will find interesting:

  • For the first eight years of its history, it was actually divided into two separate colonies, East Jersey and West Jersey, but it became a single royal colony in 1702.
  • Although British colonist George Carteret wasn’t who founded New Jersey, the state was named in his honor. He had been governor of the Isle of Jersey in the British Isles.
  • In 1758, the first American Indian reservation, the Shamong Township, was established in NJ.
  • Iron ore was a key resource of the New Jersey colony. It was able to export items such as nails, locks, and plows back to England and to the other colonies.
  • Although far less well-known, New Jersey had its own tea party uprising about a year after Boston’s. Called the “Greenwich Tea Party,” it set a cargo of tea afire in a field.
  • During the Revolutionary War, George Washington and his troops spent more time fighting in NJ than in any other colony.
  • In 1787, New Jersey became the third state to join the U.S. and the first state to sign the Bill of Rights.

In 1790, the town of Trenton officially became the capital of the new state of New Jersey. And that was just the beginning of the story of the Garden State. Here is some more New Jersey state history trivia that you’ll enjoy learning:

  • The first officially recorded baseball game in America happened on June 19, 1846 in Hoboken, NJ.
  • Over 25,000 New Jersey soldiers fought for the Union in the Civil War.
  • The inventor of the submarine, John Holland, first tested his prototype in New Jersey’s Passaic River in 1878.
  • Many of the patents for Thomas Edison’s inventions were granted while he was working in the state, including the light bulb.
  • The disaster that destroyed the German passenger airship LZ 129 Hindenburg in 1937 happened when it was attempting to dock in NJ.
  • Also in 1937, the first FM radio stat
  • New Jersey residents did not have to pay state income tax until 1976.

New Jersey Geographical Facts

While there are plenty of historical New Jersey facts for children to learn, the geography of the state is worth covering in your homeschool unit study as well. Exploring a map of the state will help a lot. You may want to print out this map of New Jersey and start marking it up with everything you’ve learned. Here are just some of the things you may want to explore and mark on your map.

  • Even though it is the fourth smallest state in America, NJ has a wide variety of ecosystems including pine forests, salt marshes, a mountainous region, and many lakes and rivers.
  • New Jersey is the most densely populated state in the US, and it is the only state where all of its counties are labeled “urban” or “metropolitan.”
  • Food and agriculture are New Jersey’s third leading industry, so it’s no surprise that it is nicknamed “The Garden State.”
  • One of the interesting New Jersey culture facts has to do with food, as well. It is called the “Diner Capital of the World” because it has more diners than any other state.
  • Many people associate the Statue of Liberty with New York City, but it is technically in the waters of Jersey City, NJ.
  • The largest seaport in the US is located in Elizabeth, NJ.

New Jersey State Map

Download our FREE New Jersey state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Activities for Children in New Jersey

Whether you live in New Jersey or are planning a trip there soon, you’ll be excited to know that there are learning opportunities around every corner. Below are links to some of the best historical places in NJ, as well as sites that are ideal for science, art, and nature study as well. Each one of the destinations has incredible potential for learning and will enhance your New Jersey homeschool unit study.

  • Aviation Hall of Fame of New Jersey (Teterboro) — Not only does this museum offer the chance to learn about the history of aviation, but there are many educational programs designed for children as well, including a program that teaches aeronautics through building gliders.
  • Cora Hartshorn Arboretum and Bird Sanctuary (Short Hills) — Get up close and personal with nature at this outdoor paradise of trails and grounds. It includes a birdwatcher’s room, animal exhibits, and educational programs throughout the year.
  • Historic Cold Spring Village (Cape May) — June through September, this living history museum stretches across 22 acres and introduces families to rural life in Southern New Jersey in the 1800’s. There are education programs for people of all ages.
  • Montclair Art Museum (Montclair) — This unique museum highlights not only American art, but Native American art, as well. The collection includes over 12,000 works and offers traveling exhibits as well. Many educational programs are available for students.
  • Storybook Land (Egg Harbor Township) — It couldn’t be easier to tie in a literature study with this field trip option. Your family can walk through the most memorable stories of your childhood in this book-themed park.

For additional field trip options in New Jersey, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s New Jersey Field Trips with Kids page.

New Jersey Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Adventure Aquarium (Camden) — During special days of the school year, homeschoolers are eligible for tickets at up to 50% off normal pricing.
  • Cape May County Park & Zoo (Cape May Court House)— Zoos with free admission are few and far between, so don’t miss a chance to visit this one, especially since they are open every day of the year except Christmas!
  • Cedar Run Wildlife Refuge (Medford) — Homeschoolers ages 3-14 can attend nature education classes on the second Tuesday and Wednesday of each month, September through June. Cost is only $10 per child.
  • Grover Cleveland’s Birthplace (Caldwell) — Step back in time to the early 1800’s with this museum dedicated to the country’s 22nd (and 24th!) president. It is open five days a week and self-guided tours are FREE to the public.
  • Seabrook Educational and Cultural Center (Seabrook) — Immerse yourself in the stories of Japanese and other immigrant and refugee populations who created this culturally diverse community. You’ll be fascinated by the large scale model of the village from the 1950’s as well as many other exhibits. Admission is FREE and hours are Mondays-Thursdays from 9 to noon.

New Jersey Learning Games for Children

Want to extend your New Jersey unit study even farther? The following learning resources will introduce you to even more fun facts about New Jersey and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

Get each Time4Learning Homeschool Unit Study sent straight to your inbox as soon as it is released!

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Homeschool Unit Study: Pennsylvania State Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-unit-study-pennsylvania-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-unit-study-pennsylvania-state-facts/#respond Mon, 11 Dec 2017 14:00:49 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11637 Why is Pennsylvania called the Keystone State? What is Pennsylvania’s capital? Who was the only U.S. President from Pennsylvania? These are just some of the questions we will answer in our homeschool unit study highlighting Pennsylvania. If you are just discovering Time4Learning’s state homeschool unit studies, not to worry. You can find all of the […]]]>

Why is Pennsylvania called the Keystone State? What is Pennsylvania’s capital? Who was the only U.S. President from Pennsylvania? These are just some of the questions we will answer in our homeschool unit study highlighting Pennsylvania. If you are just discovering Time4Learning’s state homeschool unit studies, not to worry. You can find all of the state unit studies here.

In this study, we’re exploring another of the original 13 colonies, Pennsylvania, including historical facts about Pennsylvania, plenty of info about the state’s geography, and even some fun things for children to do in the state. You’ll also enjoy our collection of online Pennsylvania learning games which will challenge your homeschoolers to test what they’ve learned via interactive play.

This particular unit study can be used as part of your geography and/or history lessons, or just a neat supplement to your regular schedule. View relevant lessons per grade level for this unit study. Are you ready to learn more about this state with such a rich history? Then let’s get studying!

Pennsylvania Fast Facts

Became a Colony

1681

Became a State

1787

State Capital

Harrisburg

State Abbreviation

PA

Border States
  • Delaware
  • Maryland
  • West Virginia
  • Ohio
  • New York
  • New Jersey
State Flag Pennsylvania State Flag
State Song

“Pennsylvania”

State Nicknames
  • Keystone State
  • Quaker State
Notable Pennsylvanians
  • James Buchanan, president (the only one from PA)
  • Louisa May Alcott, author
  • Daniel Boone, frontiersman
  • Benjamin Franklin, inventor
  • M. Night Shyamalan, filmmaker
  • Rachel Carson, conservationist

Historical Facts About Pennsylvania

The area now known as Pennsylvania was originally home to many different native peoples including the Seneca tribe, the Lenape, and the Susquehannock. The first European known to explore the region was French explorer Etienne Brule who explored the Great Lakes between 1612 and 1615. Eventually, though, the area became one of the original thirteen colonies. Let’s look at some of the most interesting facts about the Pennsylvania colony for children.

  • The Swedish were the first people to colonize Pennsylvania and originally called it Nya Sverige (New Sweden).
  • William Penn, officially colonized Pennsylvania in 1681.
  • Because the land was granted to Penn by King Charles II due to a debt owed to Penn’s father, Admiral Penn, the colony was named in his honor.
  • Pennsylvania was the only colony, of the original thirteen, that didn’t border water.
  • The original government of the colony was designed chiefly to grant religious freedom to the Quakers, of whom Penn was a leader.

Pennsylvania played a critical part in the American Revolution, as well. The First and Second Continental Congress meetings were both held in Philadelphia, and the Declaration of Independence was drawn up and signed there. The Articles of Confederation that designated the thirteen colonies as an independent nation was drafted in York, Pennsylvania. Even our country’s constitution was written in Pennsylvania! Pennsylvania became a state when it ratified the constitution in 1787, making it the second state to join the Union. That certainly wasn’t the end of Pennsylvania’s history, however. Here are some more interesting Pennsylvania state facts.

  • The Civil War battle of Gettysburg was fought in PA in 1863.
  • The country’s first zoo was established in Pennsylvania by Benjamin Franklin.
  • The first computer ever used in the U.S. was in Pennsylvania in 1946.
  • It is one of only four states called a “commonwealth” which means the state puts a priority on representative government.
  • A keystone is the part of a stone arch that keeps all the other stones held in place. Because of its important role in the founding of the country, Pennsylvania is nicknamed the “Keystone State.”
  • The world’s first motion picture theater opened in Pittsburgh in 1905.
  • In 1974, the firefly was named Pennsylvania’s official state insect.

Geographical Facts About Pennsylvania

Now that we’ve looked at some of the most interesting insights into Pennsylvania’s history, let’s turn our attention to the environment of the state. Explore a map of the state and then print out our map of Pennsylvania to markup with your child. Here’s a small survey of some of the things your homeschoolers will find fascinating about Pennsylvania’s geography.

  • The Monongahela River in Western PA has a very unique feature: it flows north!
  • A small part of the state also borders the Canadian province of Ontario.
  • The town of Punxsutawney, PA is legendary because its most famous resident, a groundhog named Phil, is said to predict the weather each year on Groundhog Day.
  • One borough in Pennsylvania has been on fire for over 50 years. A coal mine in Centralia, PA caught on fire in 1962 and has been burning underground ever since!
  • The Ringing Rocks in Bucks County are a unique geographical feature because they resonate like a bell when struck (and geologists aren’t completely sure why).
  • In mid-June, the sunny mountainsides of Pennsylvania become washed in pink blooms. This display led to the designation of the Mountain Laurel as the state flower.

Pennsylvania State Map

Download our FREE Pennsylvania state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Activities for Children in Pennsylvania

If you homeschool in the state of Pennsylvania, you may or may not be aware of all the great day trips that will offer your families opportunities for both recreation and learning. If you are visiting the state, this list will be especially helpful as well. Enhance your Pennsylvania unit study with these field trip ideas.

  • Fallingwater (Ohiopyle) — For any students interested in art or architecture, a visit to this home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright is a must. The home is built directly atop a waterfall! There are opportunities for organized field trips, or you can bring any children of 6 years or older on the individual guided tours.
  • Lost River Caverns (Hellertown) — This destination will allow you to study geology up close and personal. In addition to a tour of the cave, you’ll also want to explore the nature trail which includes stations explaining the terrain of the area and features of the cave itself.
  • Punxsutawney Weather Discovery Center (Punxsutawney) — As you might expect, in a town famous for a weather-predicting groundhog, there sits a museum dedicated to weather education. This is a highly interactive field trip designed to inspire future meteorologists.
  • Salt Springs Park (Montrose) — Learn about both the cultural and natural heritage of the Susquehanna County region at this 405 acre park. There are interpretive programs for both children and adults on subjects such as stream adaptations, forest communities, wetlands and watersheds, and meadow biodiversity.
  • U.S. Mint (Philadelphia) — The manufacturing of coins is a fascinating process to learn about, and there is no better place to do that than the location of our country’s original Mint facility.

For additional field trip options in Pennsylvania, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s Pennsylvania Field Trips with Kids page.

Pennsylvania Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

Pennsylvania Learning Games for Children

Make sure to check out these available resources to assess your child’s knowledge about Pennsylvania and learn even more about the Keystone State.

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Homeschool Unit Study: Delaware State Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-unit-study-delaware-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-unit-study-delaware-state-facts/#respond Mon, 04 Dec 2017 13:00:22 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11498 On December 7, 2017, the state of Delaware will celebrate its 230th anniversary as part of the United States. In fact, it was the very first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. But this is only one of the many interesting pieces of information that your homeschoolers will find out in this unit study. We’ll […]]]>

On December 7, 2017, the state of Delaware will celebrate its 230th anniversary as part of the United States. In fact, it was the very first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. But this is only one of the many interesting pieces of information that your homeschoolers will find out in this unit study. We’ll be exploring the “First State” by pointing out some of the important historical facts about Delaware, some Delaware trivia that may surprise your students, and even some fun things for children to do in Delaware.

You’ll also enjoy our collection of online Delaware learning games which will challenge your homeschoolers to test what they’ve learned via interactive play. This particular unit study can be used as part of your geography and/or history lessons, or just a neat supplement to your regular schedule. View relevant lessons per grade level for this unit study. Are you ready to learn more about this tiny state with a big history? Then let’s get this unit study started!

Delaware Fast Facts

Became a Colony

1664

Became a State

1787

State Capital

Dover

State Abbreviation

DE

Border States
  • Maryland
  • Pennsylvania
  • New Jersey
State Flag Delaware State Flag
State Song

“Our Delaware”

State Nicknames
  • The First State
  • The Diamond State
  • Blue Hen State
Notable Delawareans
  • Joe Biden, 47th Vice-President of the United States
  • Henry Heimlich, surgeon and inventor
  • Richard Allen, founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church
  • Annie Jump Cannon, astronomer and creator of the Harvard Classification Scheme for organizing and classifying stars
  • E.I. du Pont, founder of one of the world’s largest chemical companies

Historical Facts About Delaware

The history of Delaware is a lengthy one. It begins, when in 1610, explorer Samuel Argall named the river and the bay of the area after the governor of Virginia, Thomas West, Lord De La Warr. Later, it became one of the original thirteen British colonies established in 1664. Let’s look at some fun facts about the colony of Delaware.

  • The first European settlers of the area were the Swedes and the Dutch.
  • Dutch and Swedish rule ended when the British conquered the area in 1664.
  • Legend has it that the Stars and Stripes first flew here during a Revolutionary War battle at Cooch’s Bridge in 1777.
  • Also in 1777, Dover became the capital of the state.
  • It became a state on December 7, 1787.
  • It got its nickname as “First State” because it was the first of the thirteen original colonies to ratify the U.S. Constitution.

But statehood was only the beginning for Delaware. Here are some more Delaware state facts you can share with your children.

  • The Delaware city of Lewes was bombed by the British in the War of 1812.
  • The first public schools in the state were created in 1829.
  • Delaware remained in the Union during the Civil War, however when the 13th amendment was created to abolish slavery in 1865, Delaware voted against it.
  • Between 1883 and 1886, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad extended throughout Delaware.
  • Between 1911 and 1924, Delaware added a highway that ran the length of the state.
  • In 1920, Delaware rejected the passage of a women’s suffrage amendment.
  • Over 40,000 Delawareans served in World Wars I and II.
  • The Delaware Memorial Bridge, that links the state with New Jersey, was built in 1951.
  • E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. was the state’s largest employer from the early 1900s through the 1990s.
  • Delaware’s first female governor, Ruth Ann Minner, was elected in 2000.

Geographical Facts About Delaware

While the diamond state’s history is rich, you’ll want to make sure to cover important facts about Delaware’s geography with your children, too. Exploring a map of the state will help a lot, and if you have a printable Delaware map that you can mark up, that’s even better! Here are just some of the things you may want to explore and mark on your map.

  • Delaware is the second smallest state (after Rhode Island.)
  • Despite being so small, Delaware is the sixth most densely populated state.
  • Much of the state is surrounded by water, with the Atlantic Ocean, the Delaware River, and the Delaware Bay all sharing parts of its boundary.
  • Delaware occupies most of the Delmarva Peninsula, a large peninsula on the upper East Coast of the U.S.
  • There are three state forests in Delaware: Blackbird, Taber, and Redden.
  • The southern border of the state contains over 30,000 acres of swampland.
  • Delaware has only three counties.

Delaware State Map

Download our FREE Delaware state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Activities for Children in Delaware

There is no better way to enliven a unit study than with hands-on learning! Do you live in Delaware? Or perhaps you will be traveling to the state in the near future? Homeschooling families looking for educational field trip ideas will discover plenty of things for children to do in Delaware. When planning your trip to Delaware make sure to enhance the experience for your children with these enriching activities that will surely help them absorb more knowledge on the Diamond State.

  • Ashland Nature Center (Hockessin) — 130 acres of natural landscape for learning and playing. Nature trails will wind you through marsh, woodlands, meadows, and alongside a creek. In addition, there are many educational opportunities for homeschoolers such as a Young Naturalist Club, Young Waterfowlers Club, and nature clubs for preschoolers.
  • Delaware Children’s Museum (Wilmington) — a giant learning playground for students. Homeschoolers will learn about everything from the human body to ecology to banking at the state’s only children’s museum.
  • Hagley Museum and Library (Wilmington) — the site of the original gunpowder works founded by E.I. du Pont in 1801. This memorial to industry and innovation includes both indoor and outdoor exhibits such as restored mills, a workers’ community, and the original home and gardens of the du Pont family.
  • Historic Odessa (Odessa) — historic village that played an important role in the 18th century commercial life of the state. There are guided tours of the properties, or you can explore on your own to see striking displays of the architecture and grounds.
  • The St. Jones Reserve (Dover) — a natural estuary filled with hiking trails and interactive exhibits. Your homeschool students will enjoy a ¼ mile jaunt on a boardwalk over the salt marsh, as well as the restoration demonstration areas.

For additional field trip options in Delaware, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s Delaware Field Trips with Kids page.

Delaware Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • The Delaware Contemporary (Wilmington) — this art museum offers FREE admission, and it features “Free Family Sundays,” a guided art exploration for children and parents.
  • Air Mobility Command Museum (Dover)— a great place to learn about the history of the Air Force, and Dover AFB in particular. Museum admission is completely FREE and students 10 and older will even have an opportunity to fly any of the museum aircraft on a flight simulator.
  • Seaside Nature Center (Lewes) — as if five 1,000 gallon fish tanks and a touch tank filled with local wildlife weren’t enough to convince you to visit this destination, there is no cost for this educational outing! Plus, it is also part of the Friends of Cape Henlopen State Park’s free borrow-a-bike program.
  • Woodburn, the Governor’s Residence (Dover) — although you’ll need to schedule them at least 24 hours in advance, tours of Woodburn are free to the public. The home was built in 1798 and has an incredibly diverse history attached to it.
  • Port Penn Interpretive Center (Port Penn) — this state park is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day each year and features exhibits that highlight the folklife of the 250 year old village. FREE admission.

Delaware Learning Games for Children

Want to extend your Delaware unit study even farther? The following learning resources will introduce you to even more fun facts about Delaware and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

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