Tips & Worksheets – Time4Learning https://www.time4learning.com Homeschool, Afterschool, Skill Building Mon, 15 Jan 2018 16:31:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 Homeschool Unit Study: Connecticut State Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-connecticut-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-connecticut-state-facts/#respond Tue, 09 Jan 2018 13:30:57 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11787 On January 9, 1788, Connecticut became the fifth of the original colonies to join the United States, and we’ve prepared you this homeschool unit study just in time for Connecticut’s anniversary. Whether you live in Connecticut or are simply interested in the “Constitution State,” we’ve collected information about its history and geography for you to […]]]>

On January 9, 1788, Connecticut became the fifth of the original colonies to join the United States, and we’ve prepared you this homeschool unit study just in time for Connecticut’s anniversary. Whether you live in Connecticut or are simply interested in the “Constitution State,” we’ve collected information about its history and geography for you to use as part of your homeschool state unit study. You’ll also find educational destinations in CT, perfect for planning field trips with your homeschoolers. Once you’ve studied all the interesting facts about Connecticut, put your homeschooler to the test with fun learning games and other activities about the Nutmeg state. Combine this unit study with the unit studies about the different states to teach your homeschooler the rich history of our country. Are you ready to find out what important reference book was first published in Connecticut? Want to know how many miles of river wind through the state? Then let’s get started learning!

Connecticut Fast Facts

Became a Colony 1636
Became a State 1788
State Capital Hartford
State Abbreviation CT
Border States
  • New York
  • Massachusetts
  • Rhode Island
State Flag Connecticut State Flag
State Song Yankee Doodle
State Nicknames
  • The Constitution State
  • The Nutmeg State
Notable People from Connecticut
  • Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin
  • Katharine Hepburn, actress
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe, abolitionist
  • George W. Bush, 43rd president of the U.S.
  • Nathan Hale, Revolutionary War hero
  • J.P. Morgan, entrepreneur
  • Noah Webster, journalist

Historical Facts About Connecticut

The word Connecticut is derived from a word that the Mohegan tribe had for the long, winding river that flowed through the area that is now Connecticut: “Quinnehtukqut.” For thousands of years, the Mohegan were the only inhabitants of the area until English Puritans created a settlement there. In 1636, it officially became a colony. Let’s discover some other interesting Connecticut colony facts.

  • The first European explorer to discover the Connecticut area was Dutchman Adriaen Block.
  • While under Dutch rule, the area was part of the Dutch colony called “New Netherland.”
  • From 1703 to 1875, the state had two different capitals: Hartford and New Haven. Hartford eventually became the single state capital.
  • In 1647, the colonists hanged Alse Young for the crime of witchcraft.
  • Chief trade and enterprise in the Connecticut Colony included whaling, fishing, shipbuilding, fur trading, timber production, and maple syrup.
  • The first medical diploma ever issued in the United States was at Yale University in CT in 1729.
  • It was the fifth colony to become a state on January 9, 1788.

But statehood was only the beginning for Connecticut. Here are some more Connecticut state facts your homeschoolers will be interested to learn.

  • Because of its structural government document of 1638/1639 called “The Fundamental Orders,” Connecticut got its nickname as “The Constitution State” for having the first formal state constitution in the Western world.
  • In 1806, Noah Webster published his first dictionary in the state.
  • Many abolitionists lived in CT during the anti-slavery movement of the 1800’s, including Harriet Beecher Stowe and John Brown.
  • The Hartford Courant, established in 1764, is the oldest continually published newspaper in the U.S.
  • In the 1920’s, Yale students discovered that empty pie tins from Mrs. Frisbie Pies in Bridgeport could be sailed across the campus lawns, giving rise to the game of “frisbee.”
  • The world’s first nuclear submarine was launched from CT in 1954.
  • Connecticut has no county government. There is state-level government and then city/town-level government.

Geographical Facts About Connecticut

While there are plenty of Connecticut facts for children that highlight the history of the state, you’ll want to make sure to cover important facts about Connecticut’s geography, too. Exploring a map of the state will help a lot, then download our printable Connecticut map and mark it up with your child! Here are just some of the things you may want to explore and mark on your map.

  • Connecticut is the third smallest state (after Rhode Island and Delaware)
  • The Connecticut River, the Thames River, and the Long Island Sound have been formative in the state’s long maritime history.
  • The state has a variety of geographical features including rolling mountains, river valleys, and beaches.
  • There are over 5,800 miles of river in the state of CT.
  • All three rock types are found in Connecticut: sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous.
  • If you are standing in Stamford, CT, you can travel north, south, east, or west, and the next state you will hit is New York.
  • Mt. Frissell, the highest point in Connecticut, is found in the northwestern corner of the state.
  • Geologists believe that Lake Hitchcock in CT formed over 15,000 years ago when a glacial ice melt dammed up part of the Connecticut River.
  • Ivy League University Yale, is located on the south part of this small state, in the city of New Haven, 40 miles south of the state’s capital Hartford!

Connecticut State Map

Download our FREE Connecticut state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Educational Places of Interest in Connecticut

One of the best ways to energize any state unit study is by adding hands-on activities. Do you live in Connecticut? Or perhaps you will be traveling to the state in the near future? Homeschooling families will discover plenty of interesting things in Connecticut that are perfect for field trips. Here are some ideas for day trips where you can experience Connecticut’s history and geography for yourself.

  • Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum (Ridgefield) — in addition to the chance to experience many forms of modern art, the museum offers educational programs specifically for families, including take-home projects.
  • Connecticut Children’s Museum (New Haven) — a giant learning playground for students. Homeschoolers will learn about everything from music to logic and mathematics to the natural world in the museum’s eight thematic rooms.
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe Center (Hartford) — visit Stowe’s historic home to learn about what inspired her to write Uncle Tom’s Cabin and to find out why her story is still relevant in today’s world.
  • Mystic Aquarium and Institute for Exploration (Mystic) — a place to interact with a wide variety of marine life including beluga whales, sea lions, and African penguins. The aquarium offers both formal and informal educational programs.
  • New Pond Farm Education Center (West Redding) — instead of a single field trip, this destination is designed for long-term membership. Members have year-round access to 102 acres of this small working farm with learning opportunities on everything from Native Americans to astronomy.

For additional field trip options in Connecticut, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s Connecticut Field Trips with Kids page.

Connecticut Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

Connecticut Learning Games for Children

Want to extend your Connecticut unit study even farther? The following learning resources will introduce you to even more fun facts about Connecticut and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

Get each Time4Learning Homeschool Unit Study sent straight to your inbox as soon as it is released!

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Homeschool Unit Study: Martin Luther King, Jr. Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-martin-luther-king-jr-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-martin-luther-king-jr-facts/#respond Mon, 08 Jan 2018 13:30:51 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=12052 Learning about important people in history helps students learn about the past and how things used to be, as well as discover how so many brave individuals helped improve and bring about positive change in the world we live in. This week, we celebrate the birthday of one such person. Martin Luther King Jr. became […]]]>

Learning about important people in history helps students learn about the past and how things used to be, as well as discover how so many brave individuals helped improve and bring about positive change in the world we live in.

This week, we celebrate the birthday of one such person. Martin Luther King Jr. became one of the most well known leaders of the Civil Rights Movements in the 1950s and 60s. This unit study covers various aspects of his life’s work, how he inspired others, and how he has and continues to be recognized today. If you are incorporating Martin Luther King Jr. lesson plans into your curriculum this week, your homeschoolers will benefit from these additional learning opportunities.

Martin Luther King Jr. Timeline

1929

King was born on January 15 in Atlanta, GA.

1948

Graduates from Morehouse College, a historically African American college in Atlanta.

1951

Graduates from Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania.

1953

Marries Coretta Scott.

1955

Receives a Ph.D. from Boston University. The bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama begins.

1956

Montgomery bus system ends segregation.

1957

King is named president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which focuses on advancing the rights of African Americans.

1958

King’s first book is published, “Stride Toward Freedom.”

1963

King delivers his “I Have a Dream” speech during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial.

1964

King is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

1968

King is assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee.

1986

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is celebrated for the first time in the U.S.

2011

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial opens in Washington, D.C.

Martin Luther King Jr. Fast Facts

  • Martin Luther King Jr. was born January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. His birth name was Michael, but he was later renamed Martin.
  • He studied theology and received his Ph.D. in 1955 from Boston University.
  • The holiday celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. was first observed in 1986. It is celebrated the third Monday in January. For the first time in the year 2000, it was celebrated in all 50 states.
  • In the U.S., there are approximately 900 streets named after Martin Luther King Jr. in 39 states, Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico. Eleven cities have freeways named after him.
  • Outside the U.S., Brazil, Israel, and Senegal have streets named after him.
  • Martin Luther King Jr. gave over 2,500 speeches during his lifetime and wrote 5 books.
  • King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington.
  • He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 at the age of 35.
  • He was assassinated April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.

Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

The Civil Rights Movement took place in the U.S. from 1954-1968. Because African Americans didn’t have the same rights as white citizens, the goal was to gain equality by ending segregation and discrimination. Civil rights activists fought and protested for equal opportunities in education, employment, housing, and the right to vote.

Martin Luther King, Jr’s involvement in the Civil Rights Movement began in 1955 with the Montgomery bus boycott in Alabama. On what would be a catalyst moment, Rosa Parks, a black woman, refused to give up her seat for a white passenger. This event prompted the head of the local National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to reach out to King to help lead the boycott of the bus system in Montgomery. The boycott lasted over a year, but finally, in December of 1956, after legal action against the city ordinance, Montgomery desegregated their bus system.

Learn more about the Civil Rights Movement with these Elementary Social Studies Lesson Plans 

In the years that followed, King continued to peacefully deliver thousands of speeches and lectures, organize events, and urge the public to use nonviolent methods when protesting. Activists took part in boycotts, marches, and sit-ins, a form of protest in which African-Americans would sit in all-white areas at lunch counters and other facilities to protest racial segregation.

During this time period, King and thousands of other activists were attacked and subjected to harassment, violence and intimidation. But they persisted despite the hate and ignorance they were met with.

A momentous event took place in August of 1963 when King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech in front of over 200,000 Americans of all races at the Lincoln Memorial. Even today, excerpts of his speech continue to move people all over the world. One of the most notable is, “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

Cross-Curricular Activities for Martin Luther King Jr. Unit Study

The Martin Luther King Jr. story is much more than just dates and facts, of course. The message Dr. King shared and embodied has shaped the very culture of 20th and 21st century America and is as significant today as it ever was. Students will be much more engaged in the history of MLK, Jr, though, if they are able to connect his story with their own. Below you will find some multisensory learning activities, organized by grade level, to help your homeschoolers get even more out of this unit study.

Elementary Martin Luther King Jr. Activities

  • Do you have a small box, a few plastic eggs, or even a cup with a lid in the house? Collect the letters from an old scrabble board, or make your own with small pieces of paper to spell out some of the following MLK, Jr. vocabulary words:  civil, rights, freedom, equality, protest, speech. Place the letters of the words, one word at a time, into your container. Have your student shake them up and pour them out and then unscramble them to spell out the vocabulary word.
  • Every picture tells a story. Browse pictures on the web of Dr. King’s life, and pick one or two that could be used as a story starter for your elementary age homeschooler. They could write (or tell) about what they think happened just after the picture was taken.

Middle School Martin Luther King Jr. Activities

  • The “What If” game is a popular way to help students build problem solving skills. To apply the “What If” game to your MLK, Jr. study, ask your homeschooler questions such as, “What if Martin Luther King had not been a minister. Would that have changed how people received his message?”  Another example of a question might be, “What if Dr. King had been born in the northern U.S? Would he have had the same passion about civil rights?”
  • Using some of the facts they’ve learned about Dr. King, have your middle schooler create an acrostic of the word FREEDOM. Each letter of the word would start a sentence that states a fact about the life and times of MLK, Jr.

High School Martin Luther King Jr. Activities

  • Has your high schooler ever studied genealogy? Set them on a research project to see how many generations of Martin Luther King Jr.’s ancestors they can track down. You might even turn it into an art activity by creating an MLK, Jr. family tree! Discuss how his ancestry and geographical history may have contributed to his life’s path.
  • Analogies are ways to compare two different things. Martin Luther King, Jr. uses many of them in his “I Have a Dream” speech. For example, he compares our civil rights as citizens to a check. Download a copy of the speech and have your high schooler see how many analogies he or she can discover in it.

Get the complete inside scope of Time4Learning’s History II Course for High School Homeschoolers 

Quick Martin Luther King Jr. Spelling Words

Equality Justice
Fairness Movement
Harmony Perseverance
Hero Tolerance
Idealistic Unification

Martin Luther King Jr. Learning Activities & Games for Children

When teaching about Martin Luther King Jr., it’s always a great idea to incorporate learning games and activities that will help students retain the information. The following resources offer even more interactive opportunities to learn about the leader and the history of the Civil Rights movement.
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This Day in History – January 4 https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/did-you-know-this-day-in-history-january-4/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/did-you-know-this-day-in-history-january-4/#respond Thu, 04 Jan 2018 13:30:27 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11972 What’s so special about today, January 4th? If you’re scratching your head in wonder, follow along below to learn why this day stands out in history. Fun Facts About January 4th 2010 – The Dubai Tower was inaugurated as the world’s largest tower 1966 – Ronald Reagan runs for Governor of California 1954 – Rock […]]]>

What’s so special about today, January 4th? If you’re scratching your head in wonder, follow along below to learn why this day stands out in history.

Fun Facts About January 4th

  • 2010 – The Dubai Tower was inaugurated as the world’s largest tower
  • 1966 – Ronald Reagan runs for Governor of California
  • 1954 – Rock ‘n’ Roll King Elvis Presley recorded his first demo
  • 1948 – Burma gained its independence from the United Kingdom
  • 1930 – Birth of Super Bowl coach Don Shula
  • 1896 – Utah became the 45th state to join the United States of America
  • 1809 – Louis Braille was born

The History of January 4 in the 2000s

Did you know, that on this day in 2010 Dubai held the title for having the world’s tallest tower at 2,717 feet? While this is no longer the case, architecture sure reached new heights with this project. Here are some things the builders boasted about when the tower opened: World’s tallest freestanding structure, world’s highest occupied floor, world’s highest outdoor observation deck, and world’s longest-traveling elevator (1,640 feet, traveled in two minutes).

The tower has a combination of nightclubs, mosques, luxury suites and boardrooms and the world’s first Armani hotel, the world’s highest swimming pool, on the 76th floor, the highest observation deck on the 124th floor, and the highest mosque, on the 158th floor. The opening celebration featured parachute jumps, fireworks, and streams of water from the world’s tallest water fountain. The estimated cost is $1.5 billion dollars.

The History of January 4 in the 1900s

Did you know that the 40th president of the USA Ronald Reagan decided to abandon his acting career to run for office? On January 4th, 1966 he announced his candidacy for Governor of California. Reagan said,  “I am not a politician in the traditional sense of ever having held a public office, but I think I can lay claim to being a citizen politician.”

Did you know that on January 4, 1954, the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll Elvis Presley recorded his first demo record? He sure did, at Sun Records Memphis Recording Service in Nashville, Tennessee. The recording lasted 10 minutes and included two songs, “Casual Love Affair”, and a country song, “I’ll Never Stand in Your Way”.  While neither song became a hit for Elvis, they were the beginning of a long and sometimes difficult road for him as he tried to make it big in the music business.

Increase your student’s excitement about U.S. History with this interactive online course for high schoolers. 

Did you know that Burma once was controlled by the United Kingdom? For a while, Burma was part of British India, but it became a separate colony in 1937. Japan invaded Burma during World War II. The British fought many battles with the Japanese but when the war ended the Burmese government was poised to take over British control. In January 1947, General Aung Sang signed an agreement with the British Prime Minister that gave Burma full independence within a year.

Many football fans are thankful for this day because Don Shula, Super Bowl winning and Hall of Fame coach of the Miami Dolphins was born. He started his head coaching career with the Baltimore Colts but is best known as the head coach for the Miami Dolphins. There, Shula won two Super Bowls and helped his team to an undefeated season, something never accomplished in the NFL before or after that season. He currently holds the NFL record for most career wins as a head coach, with 347, and in 1997, Shula was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The History of January 4 in the 1800s

Did you know that January 4 marks the day when another star was added to the U S flag when Utah joined the Union? Well, Utahns tried several times for about 50 years to no avail. Utah finally became part of the USA on Jan 4, 1896, making it the 45th state of the nation.

Dive deeper into U.S. Geography with our series of FREE state unit studies!

Louis Braille was born on January 4, 1809, in Coupvray, France. Though he wasn’t born blind, he lost his sight at a very young age. This didn’t stop him from being an excellent student and then creating a simple system using dots. Today he is widely known for creating the tactile writing system for the visually impaired.

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Hands-On Science Activities for Elementary Students https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/hands-on-science-activities-for-elementary-students/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/hands-on-science-activities-for-elementary-students/#respond Thu, 28 Dec 2017 13:30:31 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11815 When you think back to your earliest school days, the science activities for kindergarten that come to mind probably involved actively measuring, prodding, maneuvering, and yes, squishing things, right? Young children retain information best when they are interacting with it, which is the premise behind the design of the science content from Science4Us.com. As a […]]]>

When you think back to your earliest school days, the science activities for kindergarten that come to mind probably involved actively measuring, prodding, maneuvering, and yes, squishing things, right? Young children retain information best when they are interacting with it, which is the premise behind the design of the science content from Science4Us.com.

Science4Us Ice

As a parent, you probably wish you could engage your child more with science experiments and hands-on science projects, but it can be difficult to find safe, fun, and relevant activities. You’ll be happy to know that Time4Learning offers all of the interactive content from within Science4Us’s award winning curriculum to our early elementary students. Science4Us has created a program that engages young scientists with interactive lessons, videos and songs, online investigations, printable worksheets, and hundreds of other fun science projects for kids at home.

Download a Sample Science4Us Activity

Science4Us Hands-On Worksheets

Explore, Explain, Elaborate and Evaluate. Each of the Science4Us Modules (Life Science, Earth/Space Science, Physical Science/Inquiry) includes experiential learning opportunities in every lesson.

As an example, when second graders are studying Changes in Matter, they get a hands-on and delicious opportunity to draw upon their studies of physical and chemical reactions in order to make a piece of cinnamon toast!

Hands-On Science Activity Sample

This free 2nd grade level science activity download is from the Science4Us Physical Science Module. Many similar activities are available via the Elementary Science Curriculum from Time4Learning.

Download

More Elementary Science Resources for Students

Science4Us Popsicle Sticks

Time4Learning has partnered with Science4Us because we believe that the careers of the future will be heavily dependent on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). The earlier students develop an interest and passion for these subjects, the more likely they are to become proficient in them. Science4Us content is full of opportunities for students to build a solid foundation of fundamental science skills with resources such as the following:

So tell us, what was the science lesson or experiment in your early years that you still remember today? Leave a reply in the comments section below.

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Homeschool Unit Study: Georgia State Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-georgia-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-georgia-state-facts/#respond Tue, 26 Dec 2017 13:00:46 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11801 Georgia, the southeastern state with the largest land mass and population, is sometimes called “The Empire State of the South.” It became part of the United States on January 2, 1788 — the 10th state to join. Let’s celebrate Georgia’s anniversary on January 2nd by learning more about this state’s history. Those pieces of Georgia’s […]]]>

Georgia, the southeastern state with the largest land mass and population, is sometimes called “The Empire State of the South.” It became part of the United States on January 2, 1788 — the 10th state to join. Let’s celebrate Georgia’s anniversary on January 2nd by learning more about this state’s history. Those pieces of Georgia’s state trivia, though, are only a glimpse at all the fun facts you’ll learn about in this post from our Time4Learning homeschool state unit studies.

Below, you will find information on Georgia’s colonial period, as well as fun facts about its history as a state. You will also get insights into the state’s geographical makeup. Don’t miss our lists of educational places to visit in the state, including some where you can get in free or at a discounted rate. Finally, you’ll definitely want to follow the links to learning games and printables that can enhance your state study. Don’t forget to view relevant lessons per grade level for this unit study. Let the learning begin!

Georgia Fast Facts

Became a Colony

1752

Became a State

1788

State Capital

Atlanta

State Abbreviation

GA

Border States
  • Alabama
  • Florida
  • South Carolina
  • North Carolina
  • Tennessee
State Flag Georgia State Flag
State Song

Georgia on My Mind

State Nicknames
  • Peach State
  • Empire State of the South
Notable Georgians
  • Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights activist
  • Julia Roberts, actress
  • Ray Charles, singer
  • Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the U.S.
  • Flannery O’Connor, author
  • Sonny Carter, NASA Astronaut
  • Bill Terry, baseball great
  • Ryan Seacrest, radio and tv personality

Historical Facts About Georgia

For much of Georgia’s pre-colonial period, the Creek Nation were the main inhabitants of the area. Even after the land was colonized, Creek Indians outnumbered European colonists until at least 1760. Georgia colony history begins late, in terms of colonial settlement. In fact, it was the last of the established English colonies in North America. Here are some other Georgia colony facts your homeschoolers will want to learn about.

  • The original purpose envisioned for the establishment of a colony in Georgia was for a place to keep English subjects who had been imprisoned for debtedness.
  • The colony was also designed to be a buffer between the southern British colonies and Spanish-controlled Florida.
  • The original European inhabitants settled in the area of what is now Savannah, GA.
  • After Britain’s victory in the French and Indian war, the boundaries of the Province of Georgia were expanded, making it the largest of the original 13 colonies.
  • King George II of England specified in the charter of Georgia that the colony should be named after him.
  • Washington, Georgia, established in 1780, was the first city in North America to be named after George Washington.
  • At the time of the American Revolution, there were already over 18,000 slaves owned in GA.

Following its ratification of the constitution and new beginnings as a state, Georgia experienced significant prosperity, in large part because of the invention of the cotton gin. Here are several more facts about Georgia that your homeschoolers will be interested to learn.

  • Georgia was the first state to create a state-supported university in 1785, named Franklin College (after Benjamin Franklin.)
  • It was also the site of the first full college for women in the country, established in 1836.
  • The only two Georgians to receive the Nobel Peace Prize are Jimmy Carter and Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • In 1861, Georgia seceded from the Union and became part of the Confederate States of America.
  • In 1886, pharmacist John Pemberton created a non-alcoholic version of the French wine coca, calling it Coca-Cola, and it was first sold in Atlanta.
  • The Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. was founded in Savannah, GA in 1912.
  • Atlanta-born minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., based his Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the state.

Geographical Facts About Georgia

While there are plenty of fun facts about Georgia that highlight the history of the state, you’ll want to make sure to cover important facts about Georgia geography, too. Exploring a map of the state will help a lot. Then download our printable Georgia map and mark it up with your child! Here are just some of the things you may want to explore and mark on your map.

  • Atlanta International Airport in central GA is the world’s busiest passenger airport.
  • Georgia is the largest state east of the Mississippi River.
  • Although known as the “Peach State,” Georgia is also the largest producer of peanuts and pecans in the United States.
  • Throughout its history, the state of Georgia has had five different capital cities, including Savannah, Augusta, Louisville, Milledgeville, and Atlanta. Can you locate and mark each of those on your map?
  • After Texas, Georgia has the next highest number of counties of any state, at 159.
  • South Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp in southeast Georgia is the largest swamp area in North America.
  • Stone Mountain, just east of Atlanta in central Georgia, is really not a mountain at all, but rather the largest single block of granite in the world.

Georgia State Map

Download our FREE Georgia state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Educational Places of Interest in Georgia

Homeschooling families know that there is no better way to get children engaged with their studies than with a field trip! Georgia has a wealth of places where children can study history, geography, and many other subjects for themselves. Here are some ideas for day trips where you can get hands-on with your learning and enhance your Georgia state unit study.

  • Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson (Augusta) — not only can you find out more about our 28th president at this destination, you will also learn about the succession of the south, the First World War, and the history of the Presbyterian church in the U.S.
  • Georgia Sea Turtle Center (Jekyll Island) — this working hospital for sea turtles allows visitors to observe feedings, meet the current patients, participate in educational programs, and take sunrise and evening turtle walks.
  • Interactive Neighborhood for Kids (Gainesville) — at this children’s museum, your homeschoolers can role play and imagine themselves as doctors and nurses, x-ray technologists, dentists, bankers, postal workers, grocery clerks, and more.
  • Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University (Atlanta) — educational destination for over 30,000 school children each year. Includes large collections of Egyptian, Near Eastern, and ancient American art and artifacts.
  • Tellus Science Museum (Cartersville) — began as a geological museum and has expanded to educate children and families about a multitude of science fields. Annual members have Lunch-n-Learn and Friday Night Science opportunities, too.

For additional field trip options in Georgia, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s Georgia Field Trips with Kids page.

Georgia Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Atlanta Botanical Garden (Atlanta) — Once a year, the Garden hosts a “Homeschool Day” where families can get up to $15 off normal admission prices and participate in homeschool-geared educational activities.
  • Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site (Atlanta)— Tour the place Dr. King was born and spent his childhood. You’ll also find three different museum halls dedicated to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement here. Entrance to all exhibits is FREE.
  • Mayfield Dairy Farm Tour (Braselton) — Discover the journey milk makes from the farm to the grocery store in this free company tour. Tours run every hour on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 9am to 5pm.
  • Museum of Aviation (Warner Robins) — Next to Robins Air Force Base is a facility that houses 85 historic U.S. Air Force aircraft, missiles, cockpits and award-winning exhibits and hosts numerous educational activities for children of all ages. Parking and admission at the museum are FREE.
  • Museum of History and Holocaust Education (Kennesaw) — On select Wednesdays throughout the school year, homeschoolers have an opportunity to participate in hands-on activities, listen to special speakers, take tours of the facility, and watch age-appropriate films, all for FREE.

Georgia Learning Games for Children

Want to extend your Georgia unit study even farther? The following learning resources will introduce you to even more fun facts about Georgia and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

Get each Time4Learning Homeschool Unit Study sent straight to your inbox as soon as it is released!

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Learning Throughout the Summer https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/learning-throughout-the-summer/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/learning-throughout-the-summer/#respond Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:55:57 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=9946 Time certainly does fly. I can’t believe summer is almost here. But before it does arrive, I always like to share some ideas for homeschooling during the summer. I don’t know about you, but my children tend to get a little lazy during the hot summer months. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t mind giving […]]]>

Time certainly does fly. I can’t believe summer is almost here. But before it does arrive, I always like to share some ideas for homeschooling during the summer. I don’t know about you, but my children tend to get a little lazy during the hot summer months. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t mind giving them a break and toning down the intensity of our homeschooling, but I also want to keep them sharp.

Too many children get what many of us homeschoolers call “summer brain drain.” The children work so hard all year long and then they nearly forget everything they learned. Then, in my case, I have to spend almost the whole first month of the new school year getting them back up to speed. It’s frustrating. Now I keep them learning but we change our schedule up a bit and have more fun. So even if you’re a traditional September through June homeschooler, an all-year long homeschooler, or somewhere in between, you can still use these exciting tips and boost your children’s summer learning experience.

Take Learning Outside This Summer

We all associate summertime with outdoor activities. Now apply that association with summertime homeschooling. There are a ton of things you and your children or whole family can enjoy. And while you’re enjoying, spend some time teaching your kids about nature, biology, history and so many other things. Here’s what our family enjoys:

  • Fishing: Our children learn about the different bait and their habitat. We also study the game fish and their habitat. My youngest son knows everything about largemouth bass! They also learn about knot tying.
  • Camping: We prepare an open fire and teach our children the importance of fire safely. We cook over the open fire and set up our own tents.
  • Time at the ocean and bay: We collect shells, name and record the types of birds we see, and even get a little muddy as we explore the bay. It’s like having your own outdoor lab.
  • Swimming: This is not only great exercise but our kids also learn CPR and water safety.
  • Tennis: We play tennis as a family and the exercise and exertion helps our children burn off steam.

Build your own list of fun teachable moments and your children certainly won’t mind learning about the great outdoor world through sports, recreation, and exploration.

Take Summer Learning on the Road

Every trip to a new town or city offers wonderful teachable moments. There are museums, nature centers, historic sites, parks, and unique aspects of a town or city that makes it special.

We traveled to a small island off the west coast of Florida one year. I was worried that there’d be nothing for the children to do except swim and fish. I was wrong. Once I researched the place, I found out there are sacred Native American sites we could visit. We even took a tour and learned all about the Native Americans who made that tiny island their home. The island also had its own art community where local artists gave painting and sculpting lessons. The children absolutely loved it — and it was inexpensive.

So go ahead, take a long weekend vacation or more, but don’t forget to research the area and find the unique aspects that make it a special place. I bet you’ll find some crazy fun and educational things to do.

Create a Summertime Themed Unit Study

A summertime themed unit study is the perfect way to tackle homeschooling during the sunshine season. Below is a solid list of activities and lessons to add into your unit study. First up is our handpicked lessons from Time4Learning’s award-winning curriculum. If you haven’t subscribed to become a member of Time4Learning, summer is the perfect time to take advantage of their 14-day money back guarantee. One of the advantages of Time4Learning is that it travels easily because it’s an online curriculum. Simply login at your convenience, whether you are at home or away on vacation. Here’s a great video to explain how it works.

Also included below are games, videos, worksheets, writing prompts, and much more from a few friendly homeschooling sites. Aren’t we so lucky to be homeschooling in the summertime? Now’s the time to get ready for the season and hopefully with these ideas and resources you’re already one step ahead.

Language Arts

Reading/Writing

Science

Activities & More

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Earth Day Projects for Homeschool Families https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/earth-day-projects-for-homeschool-families/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/earth-day-projects-for-homeschool-families/#respond Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:30:52 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=9713 Eco-Friendly Ideas for Going Green This month we celebrate Earth Day. First celebrated in 1970, it was started by former Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson to bring to light the importance of taking care of our planet. There are so many ways to nurture Earth and protect it. It doesn’t matter how old you are or […]]]>

Eco-Friendly Ideas for Going Green

This month we celebrate Earth Day. First celebrated in 1970, it was started by former Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson to bring to light the importance of taking care of our planet. There are so many ways to nurture Earth and protect it. It doesn’t matter how old you are or where you live. Taking care of the place we call home starts in your own house.

Here are few tips and ideas if you want to do your part by becoming more eco-friendly. And, you don’t have to limit them to Earth Day; you can make them part of your daily life.

DIY Recycled Bird Feeder

You’ve probably been hearing about recycling for decades now, but it’s more than just tossing empty glass and plastic jars into that green bin. Next time your milk jug or soda bottle is headed for the recycling bin, turn it into an eco-friendly bird feeder. There are many ways to go about doing so, but here’s a pretty simple method.

  • Step 1: Cut a hole on one side of the bottle making sure it’s large enough for a bird to access and high enough so the seeds don’t spill out.
  • Step 2: Make two holes on opposite sides toward the top of the bottle and slide a sturdy piece of string through.
  • Step 3: Fill bird feeder with bird seed and then hang on a nearby tree branch.

You can always decorate the bottle using paints, stickers, and the like, too!

Earth Day Projects

Toilet Paper Roll Puppet

Don’t toss those empty toilet paper tubes in the trash…turn them into puppets! Not only will you reduce the amount of waste in landfills, but you’ll also be reusing and recycling too. There are lots of different characters to choose from, but we’re partial to Ed Mouse. All you have to do is print the template, color it, cut the pieces out, then glue them to your toilet paper tube.

Earth Day Projects

Eliminate Plastic Bags

When you take your weekly trip to the grocery store, bring along cloth or reusable bags. Plastic bags fill up landfills and can take about 20 years, sometimes even longer, to break down and decompose. Due to their lightweight nature, many of them end up in the ocean and other bodies of water where they are responsible for killing wildlife such as sea turtles, birds and fish. Get a selection of reusable shopping bags online or from your local arts and crafts store and use our iron on template to personalize your bag with an Earth-Day-friendly message; or decorate it using fabric markers or paint. If you go the iron-on route, make sure you check the packaging that goes with your color bag. Some are meant for dark fabric and others are intended for lighter fabric.

Earth Day Projects

Another way to go green is by signing up for Time4Learning. Our paperless curriculum is the perfect choice for families looking to reduce clutter and waste.

Learn more about our award-winning curriculum for PreK-12th grade and see for yourself how it works by viewing our demos.

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Show Your Support for Military Children This Month https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/show-your-support-for-military-children-this-month/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/show-your-support-for-military-children-this-month/#respond Tue, 18 Apr 2017 16:24:37 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=9885 There’s quite a bit going on this month in the way of celebrations and holidays. One in particular honors and supports military children everywhere. April is Month of the Military Child. Sponsored by the Department of Defense Military Community and Family Policy, this month celebrates military children of all ages by supporting and honoring them […]]]>

There’s quite a bit going on this month in the way of celebrations and holidays. One in particular honors and supports military children everywhere. April is Month of the Military Child. Sponsored by the Department of Defense Military Community and Family Policy, this month celebrates military children of all ages by supporting and honoring them for the sacrifices they make.

Military children have a lot of challenges to overcome and stress to bear. Being the child of a parent in the military usually means having to deal with change on a regular basis, which can prove difficult for both younger and older children. There’s frequent moves and relocations, which often means having to start a new school, make new friends, and get accustomed to a new state or country, and perhaps even a new language. When a parent is deployed, these brave children have to go months on end without one or both parents. There is also the added anxiety and concern for a parent’s safety, especially if he or she is deployed to a country in turmoil.

This can be a lot for a child to take in, and by letting them know that we support them, they’ll know that they are never alone in their journey as a military child.

Purple Up! For Military Kids

Show your support and celebrate military child appreciation day on April 21st by wearing purple. In doing so, you’ll be letting the sons and daughters of service members know that you stand by them and thank them for their strength and sacrifices. Why purple? The color symbolizes the combined colors of all the branches of the military, so be sure to purple up on April 21st!

There are many other ways to show your support during military child month. If you or your spouse are not in the military but have friends or family members who are, offer to give them a hand with the kids. You can cook a meal for the family, offer to watch the kids for a few hours, or help with a particular household chore like laundry.

How Can Time4Learning Help Military Families?

If you’re a military family, we’d like to say thank you for everything you do and all that you sacrifice. Know that you have the support of those around you, and if you ever need a hand, rest assured we are here to help. All you have to do is ask.

We take pride in knowing that Time4Learning’s award-winning, comprehensive curriculum offers military families tons of flexibility. The web-based format means that you can bring Time4Learning wherever your orders take you, eliminating the need to start a new school with each move. Our engaging PreK-12th grade curriculum teaches math, language arts, science, social studies, and even foreign languages. Time4Learning also includes printable worksheets, lesson plans, and automated reports for parents.

More importantly, Time4Learning helps military children thrive in an environment that is often changing. Student-paced lessons allow children to move quickly through their strongest subjects and dedicate additional time to subjects that are more challenging. The latter can be particularly important for children who have had gaps in their academic school year for one reason or another. The online curriculum caters to today’s students, who are primarily visual learners, and helps them gain confidence in an independent learning environment. Time4Learning brings concepts to life with animated, fun characters rather than traditional lectured instruction, which can quickly cause students to lose their attention and focus. Time4Learning combines the technology kids crave, with the education they need to make learning fun.

Time4Learning is excited to support and celebrate military child month and we encourage you to do the same. Learn more about how Time4Learning can help military families.

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Homeschool Unit Study: Giving, Hope, and Family https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/holiday-homeschool-unit-study-giving-hope-and-family/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/holiday-homeschool-unit-study-giving-hope-and-family/#respond Thu, 17 Nov 2016 20:11:39 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=8784 And just like that, the year is coming to a close, and the end-of-year hustle and bustle is upon us. If you’re like me at this time of year, homeschooling tends to get lost in the shuffle of preparing meals, travel arrangements, buying gifts, and more. But humor me and forget all about your to-do […]]]>

And just like that, the year is coming to a close, and the end-of-year hustle and bustle is upon us. If you’re like me at this time of year, homeschooling tends to get lost in the shuffle of preparing meals, travel arrangements, buying gifts, and more. But humor me and forget all about your to-do list for just a moment. Now, reflect on what this time of year is all about and I bet a few key themes come to mind. For me, it’s hope, giving, and family. As you turn your attention back to the realities of what lies ahead these next few weeks, I wanted to share some ideas on how to keep homeschooling going while also making sure what’s truly important this time of year, rises above all the noise.

Delegate Your Homeschooling Instruction

When you take on the role of a homeschool teacher, it’s easy to forget that the instruction doesn’t always have to be done by you. In fact, your students may benefit just as much as you by learning from someone other than yourself. During busy times, I ask my spouse, relatives, and even homeschool group members to help me tag-team my children’s homeschool activities. When I’ve exhausted my usual back-ups my go-to for homeschool instruction is actually Time4Learning! The online curriculum covers the core subjects of math, language arts, science, and social studies through fun, engaging activities my kids enjoy. Say goodbye to homeschool mom/teacher guilt!

Unconventional Learning

One of the many reasons families choose to homeschool is to give their children the opportunity to learn at their own pace. In most cases, there isn’t a schedule that we must follow. That’s one of the things that makes homeschooling so special. Students can take the time they need to achieve a real understanding of a subject and it can be done in any form or fashion. Textbooks, online curricula, or even real-world scenarios. For example, tying lessons back into the December theme, I usually like to make treats and drop them off for our local first-responders around this time of year. While my kids and I are baking a batch of delicious chocolate chip cookies, I can usually knock out a math, science, and literacy/communication lesson with them at the same time. Here’s my secret recipe:

  • Math: I ask my students to double the measurements in our recipe.
  • Science: How in the world, do all these soupy ingredients mixed together, make a solid, crisp, delicious cookie? I’m personally still trying to figure this one out, but it’s also a great way to learn chemical reactions.
  • Literacy and communication: What a perfect time to practice reading, and writing! It’s also a great way to demonstrate what happens when you don’t follow directions or miss a step in the recipe — it can wreak havoc on the outcome of your baked goods.

Themed Unit Studies

A final suggestion for homeschooling as you round out 2016 is to use a unit study that covers the core subjects while also narrowing in on the season’s themes. If you are in need of some extra lessons or activities for your children, I’ve already done the legwork. You’ll see below the handpicked lessons I pulled out from Time4Learning’s award-winning curriculum and some other homeschool friendly sites that tie into hope, giving, and family. Luckily, there are so many different ways for my children to learn outside of the standard textbooks and curricula. And isn’t that the beauty of homeschooling? Learning anywhere at anytime. When I incorporate education into an everyday lifestyle, my children tend to forget they’re actually learning!
Time4Learning December Unit Study

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Homeschool Unit Study: Earth and Space https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-earth-and-space/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-earth-and-space/#respond Tue, 04 Oct 2016 19:29:39 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=8535 It’s no secret that Time4Learning is the most convenient, comprehensive online homeschool curriculum available. We offer more than 3,000 student-paced multimedia activities in language arts, math, science, and social studies. And while our homeschool tools including lesson plans by grade and subject make it less time consuming to plan your homeschool day, week, month ,or year, […]]]>

It’s no secret that Time4Learning is the most convenient, comprehensive online homeschool curriculum available. We offer more than 3,000 student-paced multimedia activities in language arts, math, science, and social studies. And while our homeschool tools including lesson plans by grade and subject make it less time consuming to plan your homeschool day, week, month ,or year, we want to offer our members one more resource – a Homeschool Unit Study.

We know how much children (and adults) can gravitate to a particular subject. What parent doesn’t love it when their child seems thirsty for seemingly endless knowledge on a topic whether it’s trains, food, or space? You can certainly find an endless supply of ideas with a Google search, but for parents trying to fulfill their children’s interest in all things earth and space, check out this list of Time4Learning lessons that point you directly to activities and assignments on space, the /sp/ sound, the long a, compound words, and more by grade level.  Saturate your children’s love of space, planets, earth’s landforms, the sky, flight, and astronauts for weeks to come.

Homeschool Unit Study - Earth and Space

Click on the image to download the Homeschool Unit Study on Earth and Space in a PDF format.

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