The Time4Learning Team – Time4Learning https://www.time4learning.com Homeschool, Afterschool, Skill Building Mon, 15 Jan 2018 16:31:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 How Much Does Homeschooling Cost? https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/how-much-does-homeschooling-cost/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/how-much-does-homeschooling-cost/#respond Thu, 11 Jan 2018 13:25:57 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=12133 The average cost of homeschooling one child per year might fall within the following ranges. Curriculum: $350-750 Materials: $150-300 Field Trips: $100-$250 Extracurriculars: $100-$500 Approximate total cost per year per student: $700-$1800 The Average Cost of Homeschooling Is homeschooling expensive? If you are just beginning the journey of homeschooling, that’s a question that is probably […]]]>

The average cost of homeschooling one child per year might fall within the following ranges.

  • Curriculum: $350-750
  • Materials: $150-300
  • Field Trips: $100-$250
  • Extracurriculars: $100-$500
  • Approximate total cost per year per student: $700-$1800

The Average Cost of Homeschooling

Is homeschooling expensive? If you are just beginning the journey of homeschooling, that’s a question that is probably front and center of your concerns. It’s also one of the toughest questions to answer, mostly because what is “expensive” to one family is quite reasonable for another. But what I think new homeschoolers really want to know is exactly what types of things they will be responsible for purchasing if they take their child’s education into their own hands. Although it isn’t something you think about too much when you are sending your child to public school, you’ll be interested to know that your costs for homeschooling will fall into three main categories:

  • curriculum (online or offline)
  • general books and education supplies
  • extracurricular activities (including local classes, athletics, field trips, etc.)

Here’s where things get especially tricky, though. One of the reasons it can be so hard to pin down average costs of homeschooling is because every family has a unique homeschool situation. For example, if you’ve chosen to homeschool your son with dyslexia because his needs aren’t being met at his current school, then you may need to factor the addition of remedial reading programs or even specialized instructors into your costs. On the other hand, a family who lives in a large city with access to multiple free museum programs, extensive libraries, and a strong homeschool co-operative may be able to homeschool for only a few hundred dollars a year!

“I had expected homeschooling to break the bank. Our family had to drop to one income to be able to teach our daughter at home. I was very surprised that we could cover most of the core subjects for less than $20 with an online curriculum. Our biggest cost turned out to be the weekly horseback riding lessons she wants to take now that she has the time. But she’s never enjoyed ‘P.E.’ more!”

Leslie, new homeschooling mom of 1

The Hidden Costs of Homeschooling

Sure, traditional schooling has plenty of “fees” associated with it, but you are usually warned at least somewhat in advance when those are involved. Homeschooling, on the other hand, can add to your monthly expenses in ways you might not have considered yet. It’s important to foresee some of the hidden ways that homeschooling may affect your pocketbook so you can begin to budget accordingly. For example, homeschooling can mean:

  • additional gas money for field trips, outings, classes, homeschool group activities, etc.
  • a slight increase in your grocery bill just because being at home all day often means more snacking.
  • additional supplies costs (especially in the beginning) to cover science projects, crafts, and hands-on activities you’ll be doing at home.

How to Save Money on Homeschooling

How much does it cost to homeschool? That depends on how resourceful you are! And the longer you homeschool, the more clever you tend to become about cutting costs. Some creative ways to keep down your homeschool expenses include:

  • taking advantage of tax-free shopping days to purchase school supplies.
  • using your local library liberally, including the online educational subscriptions they often offer.
  • attending used book sales and homeschool curriculum fairs.
  • keeping an eye out for free educational events and programs for children offered in your area.
  • researching stores and venues that offer homeschool discounts.
  • reading homeschool curriculum reviews before purchasing so that you don’t waste money on programs that aren’t right for your student.

Does homeschooling cost money? Yes, of course, but by taking advantage of free resources through your library, local homeschool co-operative, and free educational offerings online and in your local area, you can significantly reduce your overall expenses and keep your expenses within budget.

“I admit that I way overspent on curriculum our first year. By year two, we had switched to an affordable monthly curriculum, bought all our other supplies either on sale or used, and found out that our local science museum has free classes for homeschoolers twice a month. Even so, no matter what we spend, the chance to get to spend this much time with my kids is priceless to me!”

Pammy, 2nd year homeschooling mom of 3

Leave a comment below to let other families know how you keep your homeschool expenses in check.

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Homeschool Unit Study: Connecticut State Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-connecticut-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-connecticut-state-facts/#respond Tue, 09 Jan 2018 13:30:57 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11787 On January 9, 1788, Connecticut became the fifth of the original colonies to join the United States, and we’ve prepared you this homeschool unit study just in time for Connecticut’s anniversary. Whether you live in Connecticut or are simply interested in the “Constitution State,” we’ve collected information about its history and geography for you to […]]]>

On January 9, 1788, Connecticut became the fifth of the original colonies to join the United States, and we’ve prepared you this homeschool unit study just in time for Connecticut’s anniversary. Whether you live in Connecticut or are simply interested in the “Constitution State,” we’ve collected information about its history and geography for you to use as part of your homeschool state unit study. You’ll also find educational destinations in CT, perfect for planning field trips with your homeschoolers. Once you’ve studied all the interesting facts about Connecticut, put your homeschooler to the test with fun learning games and other activities about the Nutmeg state. Combine this unit study with the unit studies about the different states to teach your homeschooler the rich history of our country. Are you ready to find out what important reference book was first published in Connecticut? Want to know how many miles of river wind through the state? Then let’s get started learning!

Connecticut Fast Facts

Became a Colony 1636
Became a State 1788
State Capital Hartford
State Abbreviation CT
Border States
  • New York
  • Massachusetts
  • Rhode Island
State Flag Connecticut State Flag
State Song Yankee Doodle
State Nicknames
  • The Constitution State
  • The Nutmeg State
Notable People from Connecticut
  • Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin
  • Katharine Hepburn, actress
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe, abolitionist
  • George W. Bush, 43rd president of the U.S.
  • Nathan Hale, Revolutionary War hero
  • J.P. Morgan, entrepreneur
  • Noah Webster, journalist

Historical Facts About Connecticut

The word Connecticut is derived from a word that the Mohegan tribe had for the long, winding river that flowed through the area that is now Connecticut: “Quinnehtukqut.” For thousands of years, the Mohegan were the only inhabitants of the area until English Puritans created a settlement there. In 1636, it officially became a colony. Let’s discover some other interesting Connecticut colony facts.

  • The first European explorer to discover the Connecticut area was Dutchman Adriaen Block.
  • While under Dutch rule, the area was part of the Dutch colony called “New Netherland.”
  • From 1703 to 1875, the state had two different capitals: Hartford and New Haven. Hartford eventually became the single state capital.
  • In 1647, the colonists hanged Alse Young for the crime of witchcraft.
  • Chief trade and enterprise in the Connecticut Colony included whaling, fishing, shipbuilding, fur trading, timber production, and maple syrup.
  • The first medical diploma ever issued in the United States was at Yale University in CT in 1729.
  • It was the fifth colony to become a state on January 9, 1788.

But statehood was only the beginning for Connecticut. Here are some more Connecticut state facts your homeschoolers will be interested to learn.

  • Because of its structural government document of 1638/1639 called “The Fundamental Orders,” Connecticut got its nickname as “The Constitution State” for having the first formal state constitution in the Western world.
  • In 1806, Noah Webster published his first dictionary in the state.
  • Many abolitionists lived in CT during the anti-slavery movement of the 1800’s, including Harriet Beecher Stowe and John Brown.
  • The Hartford Courant, established in 1764, is the oldest continually published newspaper in the U.S.
  • In the 1920’s, Yale students discovered that empty pie tins from Mrs. Frisbie Pies in Bridgeport could be sailed across the campus lawns, giving rise to the game of “frisbee.”
  • The world’s first nuclear submarine was launched from CT in 1954.
  • Connecticut has no county government. There is state-level government and then city/town-level government.

Geographical Facts About Connecticut

While there are plenty of Connecticut facts for children that highlight the history of the state, you’ll want to make sure to cover important facts about Connecticut’s geography, too. Exploring a map of the state will help a lot, then download our printable Connecticut map and mark it up with your child! Here are just some of the things you may want to explore and mark on your map.

  • Connecticut is the third smallest state (after Rhode Island and Delaware)
  • The Connecticut River, the Thames River, and the Long Island Sound have been formative in the state’s long maritime history.
  • The state has a variety of geographical features including rolling mountains, river valleys, and beaches.
  • There are over 5,800 miles of river in the state of CT.
  • All three rock types are found in Connecticut: sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous.
  • If you are standing in Stamford, CT, you can travel north, south, east, or west, and the next state you will hit is New York.
  • Mt. Frissell, the highest point in Connecticut, is found in the northwestern corner of the state.
  • Geologists believe that Lake Hitchcock in CT formed over 15,000 years ago when a glacial ice melt dammed up part of the Connecticut River.
  • Ivy League University Yale, is located on the south part of this small state, in the city of New Haven, 40 miles south of the state’s capital Hartford!

Connecticut State Map

Download our FREE Connecticut state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Educational Places of Interest in Connecticut

One of the best ways to energize any state unit study is by adding hands-on activities. Do you live in Connecticut? Or perhaps you will be traveling to the state in the near future? Homeschooling families will discover plenty of interesting things in Connecticut that are perfect for field trips. Here are some ideas for day trips where you can experience Connecticut’s history and geography for yourself.

  • Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum (Ridgefield) — in addition to the chance to experience many forms of modern art, the museum offers educational programs specifically for families, including take-home projects.
  • Connecticut Children’s Museum (New Haven) — a giant learning playground for students. Homeschoolers will learn about everything from music to logic and mathematics to the natural world in the museum’s eight thematic rooms.
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe Center (Hartford) — visit Stowe’s historic home to learn about what inspired her to write Uncle Tom’s Cabin and to find out why her story is still relevant in today’s world.
  • Mystic Aquarium and Institute for Exploration (Mystic) — a place to interact with a wide variety of marine life including beluga whales, sea lions, and African penguins. The aquarium offers both formal and informal educational programs.
  • New Pond Farm Education Center (West Redding) — instead of a single field trip, this destination is designed for long-term membership. Members have year-round access to 102 acres of this small working farm with learning opportunities on everything from Native Americans to astronomy.

For additional field trip options in Connecticut, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s Connecticut Field Trips with Kids page.

Connecticut Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

Connecticut Learning Games for Children

Want to extend your Connecticut unit study even farther? The following learning resources will introduce you to even more fun facts about Connecticut and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

Get each Time4Learning Homeschool Unit Study sent straight to your inbox as soon as it is released!

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Homeschool Unit Study: Martin Luther King, Jr. Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-martin-luther-king-jr-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-martin-luther-king-jr-facts/#respond Mon, 08 Jan 2018 13:30:51 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=12052 Learning about important people in history helps students learn about the past and how things used to be, as well as discover how so many brave individuals helped improve and bring about positive change in the world we live in. This week, we celebrate the birthday of one such person. Martin Luther King Jr. became […]]]>

Learning about important people in history helps students learn about the past and how things used to be, as well as discover how so many brave individuals helped improve and bring about positive change in the world we live in.

This week, we celebrate the birthday of one such person. Martin Luther King Jr. became one of the most well known leaders of the Civil Rights Movements in the 1950s and 60s. This unit study covers various aspects of his life’s work, how he inspired others, and how he has and continues to be recognized today. If you are incorporating Martin Luther King Jr. lesson plans into your curriculum this week, your homeschoolers will benefit from these additional learning opportunities.

Martin Luther King Jr. Timeline

1929

King was born on January 15 in Atlanta, GA.

1948

Graduates from Morehouse College, a historically African American college in Atlanta.

1951

Graduates from Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania.

1953

Marries Coretta Scott.

1955

Receives a Ph.D. from Boston University. The bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama begins.

1956

Montgomery bus system ends segregation.

1957

King is named president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which focuses on advancing the rights of African Americans.

1958

King’s first book is published, “Stride Toward Freedom.”

1963

King delivers his “I Have a Dream” speech during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial.

1964

King is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

1968

King is assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee.

1986

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is celebrated for the first time in the U.S.

2011

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial opens in Washington, D.C.

Martin Luther King Jr. Fast Facts

  • Martin Luther King Jr. was born January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. His birth name was Michael, but he was later renamed Martin.
  • He studied theology and received his Ph.D. in 1955 from Boston University.
  • The holiday celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. was first observed in 1986. It is celebrated the third Monday in January. For the first time in the year 2000, it was celebrated in all 50 states.
  • In the U.S., there are approximately 900 streets named after Martin Luther King Jr. in 39 states, Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico. Eleven cities have freeways named after him.
  • Outside the U.S., Brazil, Israel, and Senegal have streets named after him.
  • Martin Luther King Jr. gave over 2,500 speeches during his lifetime and wrote 5 books.
  • King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington.
  • He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 at the age of 35.
  • He was assassinated April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.

Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

The Civil Rights Movement took place in the U.S. from 1954-1968. Because African Americans didn’t have the same rights as white citizens, the goal was to gain equality by ending segregation and discrimination. Civil rights activists fought and protested for equal opportunities in education, employment, housing, and the right to vote.

Martin Luther King, Jr’s involvement in the Civil Rights Movement began in 1955 with the Montgomery bus boycott in Alabama. On what would be a catalyst moment, Rosa Parks, a black woman, refused to give up her seat for a white passenger. This event prompted the head of the local National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to reach out to King to help lead the boycott of the bus system in Montgomery. The boycott lasted over a year, but finally, in December of 1956, after legal action against the city ordinance, Montgomery desegregated their bus system.

Learn more about the Civil Rights Movement with these Elementary Social Studies Lesson Plans 

In the years that followed, King continued to peacefully deliver thousands of speeches and lectures, organize events, and urge the public to use nonviolent methods when protesting. Activists took part in boycotts, marches, and sit-ins, a form of protest in which African-Americans would sit in all-white areas at lunch counters and other facilities to protest racial segregation.

During this time period, King and thousands of other activists were attacked and subjected to harassment, violence and intimidation. But they persisted despite the hate and ignorance they were met with.

A momentous event took place in August of 1963 when King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech in front of over 200,000 Americans of all races at the Lincoln Memorial. Even today, excerpts of his speech continue to move people all over the world. One of the most notable is, “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

Cross-Curricular Activities for Martin Luther King Jr. Unit Study

The Martin Luther King Jr. story is much more than just dates and facts, of course. The message Dr. King shared and embodied has shaped the very culture of 20th and 21st century America and is as significant today as it ever was. Students will be much more engaged in the history of MLK, Jr, though, if they are able to connect his story with their own. Below you will find some multisensory learning activities, organized by grade level, to help your homeschoolers get even more out of this unit study.

Elementary Martin Luther King Jr. Activities

  • Do you have a small box, a few plastic eggs, or even a cup with a lid in the house? Collect the letters from an old scrabble board, or make your own with small pieces of paper to spell out some of the following MLK, Jr. vocabulary words:  civil, rights, freedom, equality, protest, speech. Place the letters of the words, one word at a time, into your container. Have your student shake them up and pour them out and then unscramble them to spell out the vocabulary word.
  • Every picture tells a story. Browse pictures on the web of Dr. King’s life, and pick one or two that could be used as a story starter for your elementary age homeschooler. They could write (or tell) about what they think happened just after the picture was taken.

Middle School Martin Luther King Jr. Activities

  • The “What If” game is a popular way to help students build problem solving skills. To apply the “What If” game to your MLK, Jr. study, ask your homeschooler questions such as, “What if Martin Luther King had not been a minister. Would that have changed how people received his message?”  Another example of a question might be, “What if Dr. King had been born in the northern U.S? Would he have had the same passion about civil rights?”
  • Using some of the facts they’ve learned about Dr. King, have your middle schooler create an acrostic of the word FREEDOM. Each letter of the word would start a sentence that states a fact about the life and times of MLK, Jr.

High School Martin Luther King Jr. Activities

  • Has your high schooler ever studied genealogy? Set them on a research project to see how many generations of Martin Luther King Jr.’s ancestors they can track down. You might even turn it into an art activity by creating an MLK, Jr. family tree! Discuss how his ancestry and geographical history may have contributed to his life’s path.
  • Analogies are ways to compare two different things. Martin Luther King, Jr. uses many of them in his “I Have a Dream” speech. For example, he compares our civil rights as citizens to a check. Download a copy of the speech and have your high schooler see how many analogies he or she can discover in it.

Get the complete inside scope of Time4Learning’s History II Course for High School Homeschoolers 

Quick Martin Luther King Jr. Spelling Words

Equality Justice
Fairness Movement
Harmony Perseverance
Hero Tolerance
Idealistic Unification

Martin Luther King Jr. Learning Activities & Games for Children

When teaching about Martin Luther King Jr., it’s always a great idea to incorporate learning games and activities that will help students retain the information. The following resources offer even more interactive opportunities to learn about the leader and the history of the Civil Rights movement.
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Homeschool Goal Setting: The Fun Way https://www.time4learning.com/blog/experienced-homeschooler/homeschool-goal-setting-the-fun-way/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/experienced-homeschooler/homeschool-goal-setting-the-fun-way/#respond Fri, 05 Jan 2018 13:30:44 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=12003 The Fun Side of Homeschool Objectives I admit it. I love planning. I love sitting down with calendars, books, and scheduling apps strewn in front of me and getting my game plan on. If I were to suggest this as an activity for my children, though, mutiny would likely be the next thing in my […]]]>

The Fun Side of Homeschool Objectives

I admit it. I love planning. I love sitting down with calendars, books, and scheduling apps strewn in front of me and getting my game plan on. If I were to suggest this as an activity for my children, though, mutiny would likely be the next thing in my schedule! But with a new year in sight, I know that we need to sit down and review how our homeschool objectives have gone so far and what we can improve on.

With that in mind, I’ve decided to do everything I can to make the process as fun for my homeschoolers as possible. If you are as burnt out as I am, then we all could use a fresh start, and I can’t think of any better way to get my children on board with the list of educational goals I have for them than to get them involved with the goal-setting process. Shall we?

What are the goals you have for your child?

This is the absolute first question I always ask myself when I sit down to plan a year, a month, a week, and even my day-to-day schedule. Keeping the big picture in mind means that when I start to question myself about a homeschool situation, (and oh, yes, I will question myself) I can refer back to the original goals I have for each of my children and compare the situation against what we’re really trying to accomplish.

It’s not a bad idea to even write these goals down and keep them in a place that’s easy to spot, such as:

  • in the front of your planner.
  • on your smartphone shortcuts.
  • posted on the wall of the main homeschool area in your house.

Personally, I post each child’s homeschool objectives on the refrigerator so that when it’s time to grab my daily yogurt snack (usually the one flavor that the kids like least) I get that written memory jolt. It’s like a homeschool mom’s centering mantra.

Goals, Strengths, and Needs Planner

Get the new year started on the right track with this Homeschool Goals, Strengths, and Needs Planner

Download

SMART goal setting for students

Once you have your goals for each of your homeschoolers, though, it’s time to get their input. There is a neat goal-setting technique that classroom teachers often use with students that I’ve hijacked for our own homeschooling purposes. It’s called SMART goal setting, and the acronym can be broken down as follows:

S Specific Alternatives: simple, sustainable
M Measurable Alternatives: meaningful, motivational
A Achievable Alternatives: attainable, acceptable
R Relevant Alternatives: realistic, reasonable
T Trackable Alternatives: time-limited, tangible

When it’s time to involve your homeschooler in goal-setting activities for the new year, introduce them to this table. It’s natural for students to think in terms of vague goals such as “I want to get better at math.” If they use the SMART goal checklist, though, it will help them better understand how to create more targeted goals for themselves.

Fun Activities for Homeschool Goal Setting

Now it’s time for the fun part! Remember that I said I was determined to make homeschool goal setting an activity that the whole family could enjoy. After doing my research, I found many creative ideas that not only will get us thinking about our homeschool goals but will also build important skills in planning ahead. Here are some of my favorites.

  • Write a letter to your future self. This is a letter your homeschooler will open at the end of the school year. In it, they might include things they want to learn about, skills they want to get better at, and activities they are looking forward to.

  • Create a goal competition.  Not every homeschooler is wired to be a good competitor, but if yours happen to take friendly rivalry in good stride, then create a sibling goal-off with a reward for who reaches their own personally chosen goal first.

  • Set up a family (or homeschool) success bulletin board.  Let your homeschooler(s) be in charge of the design of the board and include displays of goals, accomplishments, and notes of encouragement for each family member’s efforts.

  • Play a goal guessing game.  Family members will list one step that they will do toward accomplishing a specific goal and see if another family member can guess their overall goal just from that step.

  • Aim for an “unsolvable.”  Is there a book your student can’t read yet? An algebra problem they can’t yet figure out? Write down the “unsolvable” on paper (or place it on your bulletin board) and save it for later. At the end of the school year, let your student see if he or she has gained the skills to solve the unsolvable!

Okay, so maybe my children still aren’t going to get quite as excited about homeschool planning as I do, but I feel sure these ideas are going to at least keep mutiny at bay!


Kerry Jones is a longtime homeschooling mom of two who has used Time4Learning as the core of her curriculum approach. You can find her chatting as “Topsytechie” on the Time4Learning community forum.

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This Day in History – January 4 https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/did-you-know-this-day-in-history-january-4/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/did-you-know-this-day-in-history-january-4/#respond Thu, 04 Jan 2018 13:30:27 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11972 What’s so special about today, January 4th? If you’re scratching your head in wonder, follow along below to learn why this day stands out in history. Fun Facts About January 4th 2010 – The Dubai Tower was inaugurated as the world’s largest tower 1966 – Ronald Reagan runs for Governor of California 1954 – Rock […]]]>

What’s so special about today, January 4th? If you’re scratching your head in wonder, follow along below to learn why this day stands out in history.

Fun Facts About January 4th

  • 2010 – The Dubai Tower was inaugurated as the world’s largest tower
  • 1966 – Ronald Reagan runs for Governor of California
  • 1954 – Rock ‘n’ Roll King Elvis Presley recorded his first demo
  • 1948 – Burma gained its independence from the United Kingdom
  • 1930 – Birth of Super Bowl coach Don Shula
  • 1896 – Utah became the 45th state to join the United States of America
  • 1809 – Louis Braille was born

The History of January 4 in the 2000s

Did you know, that on this day in 2010 Dubai held the title for having the world’s tallest tower at 2,717 feet? While this is no longer the case, architecture sure reached new heights with this project. Here are some things the builders boasted about when the tower opened: World’s tallest freestanding structure, world’s highest occupied floor, world’s highest outdoor observation deck, and world’s longest-traveling elevator (1,640 feet, traveled in two minutes).

The tower has a combination of nightclubs, mosques, luxury suites and boardrooms and the world’s first Armani hotel, the world’s highest swimming pool, on the 76th floor, the highest observation deck on the 124th floor, and the highest mosque, on the 158th floor. The opening celebration featured parachute jumps, fireworks, and streams of water from the world’s tallest water fountain. The estimated cost is $1.5 billion dollars.

The History of January 4 in the 1900s

Did you know that the 40th president of the USA Ronald Reagan decided to abandon his acting career to run for office? On January 4th, 1966 he announced his candidacy for Governor of California. Reagan said,  “I am not a politician in the traditional sense of ever having held a public office, but I think I can lay claim to being a citizen politician.”

Did you know that on January 4, 1954, the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll Elvis Presley recorded his first demo record? He sure did, at Sun Records Memphis Recording Service in Nashville, Tennessee. The recording lasted 10 minutes and included two songs, “Casual Love Affair”, and a country song, “I’ll Never Stand in Your Way”.  While neither song became a hit for Elvis, they were the beginning of a long and sometimes difficult road for him as he tried to make it big in the music business.

Increase your student’s excitement about U.S. History with this interactive online course for high schoolers. 

Did you know that Burma once was controlled by the United Kingdom? For a while, Burma was part of British India, but it became a separate colony in 1937. Japan invaded Burma during World War II. The British fought many battles with the Japanese but when the war ended the Burmese government was poised to take over British control. In January 1947, General Aung Sang signed an agreement with the British Prime Minister that gave Burma full independence within a year.

Many football fans are thankful for this day because Don Shula, Super Bowl winning and Hall of Fame coach of the Miami Dolphins was born. He started his head coaching career with the Baltimore Colts but is best known as the head coach for the Miami Dolphins. There, Shula won two Super Bowls and helped his team to an undefeated season, something never accomplished in the NFL before or after that season. He currently holds the NFL record for most career wins as a head coach, with 347, and in 1997, Shula was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The History of January 4 in the 1800s

Did you know that January 4 marks the day when another star was added to the U S flag when Utah joined the Union? Well, Utahns tried several times for about 50 years to no avail. Utah finally became part of the USA on Jan 4, 1896, making it the 45th state of the nation.

Dive deeper into U.S. Geography with our series of FREE state unit studies!

Louis Braille was born on January 4, 1809, in Coupvray, France. Though he wasn’t born blind, he lost his sight at a very young age. This didn’t stop him from being an excellent student and then creating a simple system using dots. Today he is widely known for creating the tactile writing system for the visually impaired.

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Hands-On Science Activities for Elementary Students https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/hands-on-science-activities-for-elementary-students/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/hands-on-science-activities-for-elementary-students/#respond Thu, 28 Dec 2017 13:30:31 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11815 When you think back to your earliest school days, the science activities for kindergarten that come to mind probably involved actively measuring, prodding, maneuvering, and yes, squishing things, right? Young children retain information best when they are interacting with it, which is the premise behind the design of the science content from Science4Us.com. As a […]]]>

When you think back to your earliest school days, the science activities for kindergarten that come to mind probably involved actively measuring, prodding, maneuvering, and yes, squishing things, right? Young children retain information best when they are interacting with it, which is the premise behind the design of the science content from Science4Us.com.

Science4Us Ice

As a parent, you probably wish you could engage your child more with science experiments and hands-on science projects, but it can be difficult to find safe, fun, and relevant activities. You’ll be happy to know that Time4Learning offers all of the interactive content from within Science4Us’s award winning curriculum to our early elementary students. Science4Us has created a program that engages young scientists with interactive lessons, videos and songs, online investigations, printable worksheets, and hundreds of other fun science projects for kids at home.

Download a Sample Science4Us Activity

Science4Us Hands-On Worksheets

Explore, Explain, Elaborate and Evaluate. Each of the Science4Us Modules (Life Science, Earth/Space Science, Physical Science/Inquiry) includes experiential learning opportunities in every lesson.

As an example, when second graders are studying Changes in Matter, they get a hands-on and delicious opportunity to draw upon their studies of physical and chemical reactions in order to make a piece of cinnamon toast!

Hands-On Science Activity Sample

This free 2nd grade level science activity download is from the Science4Us Physical Science Module. Many similar activities are available via the Elementary Science Curriculum from Time4Learning.

Download

More Elementary Science Resources for Students

Science4Us Popsicle Sticks

Time4Learning has partnered with Science4Us because we believe that the careers of the future will be heavily dependent on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). The earlier students develop an interest and passion for these subjects, the more likely they are to become proficient in them. Science4Us content is full of opportunities for students to build a solid foundation of fundamental science skills with resources such as the following:

So tell us, what was the science lesson or experiment in your early years that you still remember today? Leave a reply in the comments section below.

Sign up for our newsletter to get regular insights and practical advice about homeschooling, skill-building, and after-school enrichment.

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Homeschool Unit Study: Georgia State Facts https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-georgia-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/tips-worksheets/homeschool-unit-study-georgia-state-facts/#respond Tue, 26 Dec 2017 13:00:46 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11801 Georgia, the southeastern state with the largest land mass and population, is sometimes called “The Empire State of the South.” It became part of the United States on January 2, 1788 — the 10th state to join. Let’s celebrate Georgia’s anniversary on January 2nd by learning more about this state’s history. Those pieces of Georgia’s […]]]>

Georgia, the southeastern state with the largest land mass and population, is sometimes called “The Empire State of the South.” It became part of the United States on January 2, 1788 — the 10th state to join. Let’s celebrate Georgia’s anniversary on January 2nd by learning more about this state’s history. Those pieces of Georgia’s state trivia, though, are only a glimpse at all the fun facts you’ll learn about in this post from our Time4Learning homeschool state unit studies.

Below, you will find information on Georgia’s colonial period, as well as fun facts about its history as a state. You will also get insights into the state’s geographical makeup. Don’t miss our lists of educational places to visit in the state, including some where you can get in free or at a discounted rate. Finally, you’ll definitely want to follow the links to learning games and printables that can enhance your state study. Don’t forget to view relevant lessons per grade level for this unit study. Let the learning begin!

Georgia Fast Facts

Became a Colony

1752

Became a State

1788

State Capital

Atlanta

State Abbreviation

GA

Border States
  • Alabama
  • Florida
  • South Carolina
  • North Carolina
  • Tennessee
State Flag Georgia State Flag
State Song

Georgia on My Mind

State Nicknames
  • Peach State
  • Empire State of the South
Notable Georgians
  • Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights activist
  • Julia Roberts, actress
  • Ray Charles, singer
  • Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the U.S.
  • Flannery O’Connor, author
  • Sonny Carter, NASA Astronaut
  • Bill Terry, baseball great
  • Ryan Seacrest, radio and tv personality

Historical Facts About Georgia

For much of Georgia’s pre-colonial period, the Creek Nation were the main inhabitants of the area. Even after the land was colonized, Creek Indians outnumbered European colonists until at least 1760. Georgia colony history begins late, in terms of colonial settlement. In fact, it was the last of the established English colonies in North America. Here are some other Georgia colony facts your homeschoolers will want to learn about.

  • The original purpose envisioned for the establishment of a colony in Georgia was for a place to keep English subjects who had been imprisoned for debtedness.
  • The colony was also designed to be a buffer between the southern British colonies and Spanish-controlled Florida.
  • The original European inhabitants settled in the area of what is now Savannah, GA.
  • After Britain’s victory in the French and Indian war, the boundaries of the Province of Georgia were expanded, making it the largest of the original 13 colonies.
  • King George II of England specified in the charter of Georgia that the colony should be named after him.
  • Washington, Georgia, established in 1780, was the first city in North America to be named after George Washington.
  • At the time of the American Revolution, there were already over 18,000 slaves owned in GA.

Following its ratification of the constitution and new beginnings as a state, Georgia experienced significant prosperity, in large part because of the invention of the cotton gin. Here are several more facts about Georgia that your homeschoolers will be interested to learn.

  • Georgia was the first state to create a state-supported university in 1785, named Franklin College (after Benjamin Franklin.)
  • It was also the site of the first full college for women in the country, established in 1836.
  • The only two Georgians to receive the Nobel Peace Prize are Jimmy Carter and Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • In 1861, Georgia seceded from the Union and became part of the Confederate States of America.
  • In 1886, pharmacist John Pemberton created a non-alcoholic version of the French wine coca, calling it Coca-Cola, and it was first sold in Atlanta.
  • The Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. was founded in Savannah, GA in 1912.
  • Atlanta-born minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., based his Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the state.

Geographical Facts About Georgia

While there are plenty of fun facts about Georgia that highlight the history of the state, you’ll want to make sure to cover important facts about Georgia geography, too. Exploring a map of the state will help a lot. Then download our printable Georgia map and mark it up with your child! Here are just some of the things you may want to explore and mark on your map.

  • Atlanta International Airport in central GA is the world’s busiest passenger airport.
  • Georgia is the largest state east of the Mississippi River.
  • Although known as the “Peach State,” Georgia is also the largest producer of peanuts and pecans in the United States.
  • Throughout its history, the state of Georgia has had five different capital cities, including Savannah, Augusta, Louisville, Milledgeville, and Atlanta. Can you locate and mark each of those on your map?
  • After Texas, Georgia has the next highest number of counties of any state, at 159.
  • South Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp in southeast Georgia is the largest swamp area in North America.
  • Stone Mountain, just east of Atlanta in central Georgia, is really not a mountain at all, but rather the largest single block of granite in the world.

Georgia State Map

Download our FREE Georgia state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Educational Places of Interest in Georgia

Homeschooling families know that there is no better way to get children engaged with their studies than with a field trip! Georgia has a wealth of places where children can study history, geography, and many other subjects for themselves. Here are some ideas for day trips where you can get hands-on with your learning and enhance your Georgia state unit study.

  • Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson (Augusta) — not only can you find out more about our 28th president at this destination, you will also learn about the succession of the south, the First World War, and the history of the Presbyterian church in the U.S.
  • Georgia Sea Turtle Center (Jekyll Island) — this working hospital for sea turtles allows visitors to observe feedings, meet the current patients, participate in educational programs, and take sunrise and evening turtle walks.
  • Interactive Neighborhood for Kids (Gainesville) — at this children’s museum, your homeschoolers can role play and imagine themselves as doctors and nurses, x-ray technologists, dentists, bankers, postal workers, grocery clerks, and more.
  • Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University (Atlanta) — educational destination for over 30,000 school children each year. Includes large collections of Egyptian, Near Eastern, and ancient American art and artifacts.
  • Tellus Science Museum (Cartersville) — began as a geological museum and has expanded to educate children and families about a multitude of science fields. Annual members have Lunch-n-Learn and Friday Night Science opportunities, too.

For additional field trip options in Georgia, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s Georgia Field Trips with Kids page.

Georgia Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Atlanta Botanical Garden (Atlanta) — Once a year, the Garden hosts a “Homeschool Day” where families can get up to $15 off normal admission prices and participate in homeschool-geared educational activities.
  • Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site (Atlanta)— Tour the place Dr. King was born and spent his childhood. You’ll also find three different museum halls dedicated to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement here. Entrance to all exhibits is FREE.
  • Mayfield Dairy Farm Tour (Braselton) — Discover the journey milk makes from the farm to the grocery store in this free company tour. Tours run every hour on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 9am to 5pm.
  • Museum of Aviation (Warner Robins) — Next to Robins Air Force Base is a facility that houses 85 historic U.S. Air Force aircraft, missiles, cockpits and award-winning exhibits and hosts numerous educational activities for children of all ages. Parking and admission at the museum are FREE.
  • Museum of History and Holocaust Education (Kennesaw) — On select Wednesdays throughout the school year, homeschoolers have an opportunity to participate in hands-on activities, listen to special speakers, take tours of the facility, and watch age-appropriate films, all for FREE.

Georgia Learning Games for Children

Want to extend your Georgia unit study even farther? The following learning resources will introduce you to even more fun facts about Georgia and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

Get each Time4Learning Homeschool Unit Study sent straight to your inbox as soon as it is released!

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Florida Field Trips for Homeschoolers https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/florida-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/florida-field-trips-for-homeschoolers/#respond Thu, 21 Dec 2017 13:30:43 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11761 One of the chief perks of homeschooling is the ability to truly experience learning, up close and personal. The flexibility of home education means being able to pick up and explore the world around you any time you wish. The field trip method of teaching is not just fun, it’s one that tends to help […]]]>

One of the chief perks of homeschooling is the ability to truly experience learning, up close and personal. The flexibility of home education means being able to pick up and explore the world around you any time you wish. The field trip method of teaching is not just fun, it’s one that tends to help children retain information about what they are studying for longer and with more depth.

Even if you are a long-time resident of Florida, you may not be aware of all the fun, educational field trip opportunities in the state. And, for the many families visiting the Sunshine State for vacation, you’ll be delightfully surprised to discover how easy it is to blend in learning with your travels! To help you locate the educational things to do in Florida with children, we’ve organized them by geographical area. Browse the list below to find the Florida day trips that are perfect for homeschool families. Plus, as a bonus, we’ve even included a free download of Time4Learning lesson plans that might be the perfect supplement for each trip!

Homeschool Field Trips in the Florida Panhandle

Panhandle Field Trips
  • Arcadia Mill Archaeological Site — The 19th century will come to life for your homeschoolers at this historical site that includes the Museum of Commerce, the Museum of Industry, the Pensacola Children’s Museum and a Colonial Archaeological Trail.
  • Constitution Convention Museum State Park, Port St. Joe — Travel back into a time in Florida’s history where statehood was just a dream in motion. Take the self-guided tour through exhibits that include a replica of the convention hall where the state constitution was ratified. This one is a must in your homeschool field trip plans.
  • Emerald Coast Science Center, Fort Walton Beach — This location lets children get hands-on with science in subjects such as robotics, electricity, natural gas, chemistry, and the ecosystem of the Emerald Coast.
  • Florida Caverns State Park, Marianna — Visit the only Florida state park that offers cave tours to the public. You’ll learn about stalagmites, stalactites, columns, and flowstone on your guided tour. Not all the educational places to visit in Florida are right for everyone, so make sure to read carefully about the tour’s somewhat strenuous and claustrophobic nature before deciding if it is a good fit for your family members.
  • Gulf Breeze Zoo, Gulf Breeze — Not every zoo offers you the opportunity to feed a giraffe, so don’t miss your chance at this destination. You’ll have plenty of hands-on encounters with wildlife here and have multiple opportunities to meet the keepers and ask them questions.

Homeschool Field Trips in North Florida

North Florida Field Trips
  • Butterfly Rainforest, Florida Museum, Gainesville — Although you’ll have the opportunity to view hundreds of different species of butterflies here, this exhibit also includes plenty of birds, turtles, fish, and other animals to see as well. Just one of the many interactive features of the Florida Museum.
  • The Daytona 500 Experience, Daytona Beach — STEM principles come to life when students get a chance to learn the physics behind the thrilling sport of motor racing. This behind-the-scenes view of the world’s only motorsports stadium will have homeschoolers ready for the races.

Are you a Jacksonville homeschool family? Discover even more opportunities for homeschool field trips in Jacksonville.

  • Dudley Farm Historic State Park, Newberry — There is no better way to explore the history of farming than with this display which will take you through three distinct generations of farming in the Dudley family. See the traditions of a farm come to life as park staff perform daily chores, tend to livestock, and raise crops.
  • The Oldest Wooden Schoolhouse in the U.S.A., St Augustine — Your homeschoolers might be surprised how comfortable they feel visiting and learning about a 200-year-old school where the schoolmaster lived on the floor right above where the students were taught!
  • Whetstone Chocolates Factory Tour, St. Augustine — This might be the tastiest Florida field trip of them all — children get a chance to tour an active chocolate factory plus a chance to test chocolates and confections as you tour. Learn about the history of chocolate making, too. This would be the perfect tie-in to any Willy Wonka themed study!

Homeschool Field Trips in Central Florida

Central Florda Field Trips
  • Central Florida Railroad Museum, Winter Garden — Have you ever wanted to see an authentic telegraph machine or a handcar? This is the place to do it! Take a tour of a museum that chronicles the history of the two main railroads that ran through Winter Garden.
  • Dinosaur World, Plant City — One of the most fun, educational field trips in Florida will transport your dinosaur-loving students right back to prehistoric times. Wander among hundreds of different life-sized dinosaur replicas while learning facts about each one and how they lived.
  • Florida Air Museum, Lakeland — The history of the first 100 years of flight is on display at this extensive facility. Allow your family at least a couple hours to take in the Howard Hughes Aviation Collection, the Rockets and High Speed Flight Exhibit, the Amelia Earhart artifacts, and so much more.
  • Manatee Observation and Education Center, Fort Pierce — Manatees, or sea cows, are vulnerable to extinction, but at this environmental education and wildlife viewing center there’s a high likelihood that you will get to see one. Get a thorough understanding of the fragile ecosystems of the Treasure Coast and their inhabitants.
  • Skeletons Museum of Osteology — Do you have a homeschooler who is fascinated by the inner framework of the animal kingdom? This one-of-a-kind museum hosts 500 real animal skeletons in a setting of true-to-life dioramas. What a great supplement for any animal study!

Homeschool Field Trips in South Florida

South Florida Field Trips
  • Everglades National Park, near Miami — Homeschoolers can hike, canoe, and even camp their way through the largest subtropical wilderness in the United States. The ecosystem of the Everglades provides the perfect setting to study everything from animal habitats to plant diversity.
  • Perez Art Museum, Miami — This extensive art display offers both ongoing and visiting exhibits. The architecture of the building, alone, is worth a visit, but students will also be amazed by the hanging gardens and the many genres of art available for viewing from landscapes to portraits to Renaissance art.

Are you a Miami homeschool family? Discover even more opportunities for homeschool field trips in Miami.

  • Edison and Ford Winter Estates, Fort Myers — The era of invention is on full display in this historical site where Henry Ford and Thomas Alva Edison had homes they retreated to in the winter months. There are even dedicated learning events just for homeschoolers!
  • Morikami Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach — If you’ve ever wanted to experience a Japanese tea ceremony, this is your chance. The gardens are exquisite, but your homeschoolers will also get to experience a typical Japanese train, shop, and living quarters inside the museum.
  • The Mound House, Fort Myers Beach — Explore 2,000 years of island life via tours and exhibits at this ancient Calusa Indian mound. Your budding historians will thrill to visit an active archaeological dig site which includes a large cutaway of a shell mound.

Homeschool Field Trips in the Florida Keys

Florida Keys Field Trips
  • Crane Point Hammock, Marathon Key — If your family are nature trail lovers, then this destination is for you. You’ll very likely stumble upon wildlife as you wander through the hardwood hammocks and find trees that grow nowhere else in U.S. Also learn about the lives of the Cranes, who worked so hard to conserve this local ecosystem.
  • Dolphin Research Center, Grassy Key — You’ll find yourself inspired to kick off a dolphin unit study after a visit to this rescue and research facility. Get interactive with these creatures by swimming alongside them in the water or just shaking their fins.
  • The Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum, Key West — One of America’s most famous authors lived and wrote at this location for over 10 years. You’ll appreciate the helpful insights from the educated tour guides and will enjoy the dozens of cats who make their home here, too.

Florida Field Trip Resource

Is there anything more fun that learning through field trips? To make your experiences at these destinations even more meaningful, Time4Learning members will appreciate this download of free lesson tie-ins for each one.

Download

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Homeschool Unit Study: Fun Facts About New Jersey https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-unit-study-new-jersey-state-facts/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/new-homeschooler/homeschool-unit-study-new-jersey-state-facts/#respond Mon, 18 Dec 2017 12:00:19 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11730 Every year on December 18, the state of New Jersey celebrates its anniversary as part of the United States. It was the third state to ratify the constitution and become part of the newly founded country. But this is only one of the many interesting facts about New Jersey that your homeschoolers will find out […]]]>

Every year on December 18, the state of New Jersey celebrates its anniversary as part of the United States. It was the third state to ratify the constitution and become part of the newly founded country. But this is only one of the many interesting facts about New Jersey that your homeschoolers will find out in this unit study. We’ll be exploring the “Garden State” by pointing out some of the important historical facts about New Jersey, some New Jersey trivia that may surprise your students, and even some fun things for children to do in the state. You’ll also enjoy our collection of online New Jersey learning games which will challenge your homeschoolers to test what they’ve learned via interactive play.

This particular unit study can be used as part of your geography and/or history lessons, or just a neat supplement to your regular social studies teaching schedule. You may want to combine it with other Time4Learning homeschool state unit studies, as well.

Are you ready to learn more about this small state with a big history? Then let’s get this homeschool unit study started!

New Jersey Fast Facts

Became a Colony 1702
Became a State 1787
State Capital Trenton
State Abbreviation NJ
Border States
  • Delaware
  • New York
  • Pennsylvania
State Flag New Jersey State Flag
State Song New Jersey is the only state without a state song.
State Nicknames
  • The Garden State
Notable New Jerseyans
  • Frank Sinatra, singer
  • Grover Cleveland, 22nd and 24th president of the United States
  • Jerry Lewis, actor and comedian
  • Judy Blume, author
  • Albert Einstein, physicist
  • Alice Paul, civil rights and women’s rights advocate

New Jersey Historical Facts

The history of the New Jersey colony begins when the area was discovered by Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano. 1664 was when New Jersey was founded by the British. Until that time it was settled mostly by Dutch, Finnish, and Swedish colonists. Here are some additional New Jersey colony facts that homeschoolers will find interesting:

  • For the first eight years of its history, it was actually divided into two separate colonies, East Jersey and West Jersey, but it became a single royal colony in 1702.
  • Although British colonist George Carteret wasn’t who founded New Jersey, the state was named in his honor. He had been governor of the Isle of Jersey in the British Isles.
  • In 1758, the first American Indian reservation, the Shamong Township, was established in NJ.
  • Iron ore was a key resource of the New Jersey colony. It was able to export items such as nails, locks, and plows back to England and to the other colonies.
  • Although far less well-known, New Jersey had its own tea party uprising about a year after Boston’s. Called the “Greenwich Tea Party,” it set a cargo of tea afire in a field.
  • During the Revolutionary War, George Washington and his troops spent more time fighting in NJ than in any other colony.
  • In 1787, New Jersey became the third state to join the U.S. and the first state to sign the Bill of Rights.

In 1790, the town of Trenton officially became the capital of the new state of New Jersey. And that was just the beginning of the story of the Garden State. Here is some more New Jersey state history trivia that you’ll enjoy learning:

  • The first officially recorded baseball game in America happened on June 19, 1846 in Hoboken, NJ.
  • Over 25,000 New Jersey soldiers fought for the Union in the Civil War.
  • The inventor of the submarine, John Holland, first tested his prototype in New Jersey’s Passaic River in 1878.
  • Many of the patents for Thomas Edison’s inventions were granted while he was working in the state, including the light bulb.
  • The disaster that destroyed the German passenger airship LZ 129 Hindenburg in 1937 happened when it was attempting to dock in NJ.
  • Also in 1937, the first FM radio stat
  • New Jersey residents did not have to pay state income tax until 1976.

New Jersey Geographical Facts

While there are plenty of historical New Jersey facts for children to learn, the geography of the state is worth covering in your homeschool unit study as well. Exploring a map of the state will help a lot. You may want to print out this map of New Jersey and start marking it up with everything you’ve learned. Here are just some of the things you may want to explore and mark on your map.

  • Even though it is the fourth smallest state in America, NJ has a wide variety of ecosystems including pine forests, salt marshes, a mountainous region, and many lakes and rivers.
  • New Jersey is the most densely populated state in the US, and it is the only state where all of its counties are labeled “urban” or “metropolitan.”
  • Food and agriculture are New Jersey’s third leading industry, so it’s no surprise that it is nicknamed “The Garden State.”
  • One of the interesting New Jersey culture facts has to do with food, as well. It is called the “Diner Capital of the World” because it has more diners than any other state.
  • Many people associate the Statue of Liberty with New York City, but it is technically in the waters of Jersey City, NJ.
  • The largest seaport in the US is located in Elizabeth, NJ.

New Jersey State Map

Download our FREE New Jersey state map printable. Use it as a coloring page or use it to plot the state’s geographical features.

Download

Activities for Children in New Jersey

Whether you live in New Jersey or are planning a trip there soon, you’ll be excited to know that there are learning opportunities around every corner. Below are links to some of the best historical places in NJ, as well as sites that are ideal for science, art, and nature study as well. Each one of the destinations has incredible potential for learning and will enhance your New Jersey homeschool unit study.

  • Aviation Hall of Fame of New Jersey (Teterboro) — Not only does this museum offer the chance to learn about the history of aviation, but there are many educational programs designed for children as well, including a program that teaches aeronautics through building gliders.
  • Cora Hartshorn Arboretum and Bird Sanctuary (Short Hills) — Get up close and personal with nature at this outdoor paradise of trails and grounds. It includes a birdwatcher’s room, animal exhibits, and educational programs throughout the year.
  • Historic Cold Spring Village (Cape May) — June through September, this living history museum stretches across 22 acres and introduces families to rural life in Southern New Jersey in the 1800’s. There are education programs for people of all ages.
  • Montclair Art Museum (Montclair) — This unique museum highlights not only American art, but Native American art, as well. The collection includes over 12,000 works and offers traveling exhibits as well. Many educational programs are available for students.
  • Storybook Land (Egg Harbor Township) — It couldn’t be easier to tie in a literature study with this field trip option. Your family can walk through the most memorable stories of your childhood in this book-themed park.

For additional field trip options in New Jersey, visit A2Z Homeschooling’s New Jersey Field Trips with Kids page.

New Jersey Freebies and Deals for Homeschoolers

  • Adventure Aquarium (Camden) — During special days of the school year, homeschoolers are eligible for tickets at up to 50% off normal pricing.
  • Cape May County Park & Zoo (Cape May Court House)— Zoos with free admission are few and far between, so don’t miss a chance to visit this one, especially since they are open every day of the year except Christmas!
  • Cedar Run Wildlife Refuge (Medford) — Homeschoolers ages 3-14 can attend nature education classes on the second Tuesday and Wednesday of each month, September through June. Cost is only $10 per child.
  • Grover Cleveland’s Birthplace (Caldwell) — Step back in time to the early 1800’s with this museum dedicated to the country’s 22nd (and 24th!) president. It is open five days a week and self-guided tours are FREE to the public.
  • Seabrook Educational and Cultural Center (Seabrook) — Immerse yourself in the stories of Japanese and other immigrant and refugee populations who created this culturally diverse community. You’ll be fascinated by the large scale model of the village from the 1950’s as well as many other exhibits. Admission is FREE and hours are Mondays-Thursdays from 9 to noon.

New Jersey Learning Games for Children

Want to extend your New Jersey unit study even farther? The following learning resources will introduce you to even more fun facts about New Jersey and will also give your homeschoolers the opportunity to test their knowledge of what they’ve learned so far.

Get each Time4Learning Homeschool Unit Study sent straight to your inbox as soon as it is released!

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Star Wars: Where Science Meets Imagination https://www.time4learning.com/blog/afterschoolskill-building/star-wars-where-science-meets-imagination/ https://www.time4learning.com/blog/afterschoolskill-building/star-wars-where-science-meets-imagination/#respond Thu, 14 Dec 2017 12:00:31 +0000 https://www.time4learning.com/?p=11743 Almost every child remembers the first time Luke Skywalker activated his lightsaber: the brilliant, fluorescent glow and the powerful humming noise. It was Star Wars tech and science fiction rolled up into one cool weapon. The audience’s collective imagination went wild. And it was fun! With the newest Star Wars movie premiering in the next […]]]>

Almost every child remembers the first time Luke Skywalker activated his lightsaber: the brilliant, fluorescent glow and the powerful humming noise. It was Star Wars tech and science fiction rolled up into one cool weapon. The audience’s collective imagination went wild. And it was fun!

With the newest Star Wars movie premiering in the next few days, everyone is talking about it. Now, teachers across the country are integrating Star Wars science into their science classes — they even help children build their own lightsabers! And why wouldn’t they? Children love the creatures, the other-worldly planets, and the amazing technology. More importantly, children are interested in learning about how they can create their own star wars universe. And that’s great because jobs in science and technology are booming and children should become aware of their benefits and the opportunities they offer.

Sign up for our newsletter to get regular insights and practical advice about homeschooling, skill-building, and after-school enrichment.

Star Wars Science Experiments

Homeschooling parents are always looking for creative ways to challenge their children and make learning exciting. Star Wars science experiments provide an amazing opportunity to blend technology with everyday homeschooling.

For example, Amazon.com offers a Star Wars Droid Inventor Kit. It comes with easy step-by-step directions — and children can work on their own or with their parents. The kit also offers an “Inventor app” that challenges children to teach their droids new skills. What an amazing way for parents to introduce their homeschoolers to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) programs.

Holograms are another way families can experiment with the effects seen in Star Wars. Holograms are a three-dimensional image formed by the interference of light beams from a laser or other coherent light source. A simple Google search will provide directions for making a hologram.

Benefits of the Science of Star Wars

As noted earlier, STEM programs and job opportunities have risen over the past decade. But the workforce experience that employers are looking for can’t match the jobs available. The President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology stated in 2012:

Economic projections point to a need for approximately 1 million more STEM professionals than the U.S. will produce at the current rate over the next decade if the country is to retain its historical preeminence in science and technology.

You may think studying STEM lessons is a bit crazy to focus on science in the early years. But any science or math, especially utilizing programs and themes that interest them, helps children become more prepared and confident in their abilities. Instilling that confidence motivates them — and also encourages learning on their own.

The Star Wars theme certainly interests most children and acts as an alternative to basic science lessons. They are visually and physically interacting with characters they have a connection with and a love for because they’ve experienced them at the movies. Take advantage and watch your children enjoy themselves as they learn.

Impact of Star Wars on Society

The characters in star wars impacted people of all ages. Their wacky names (Obi Wan Kenobi), and endearing habits, such as the worried C-3PO, piqued the interest of the young and not so young alike. But what really made the movies memorable have been the incredible weapons, spaceships, and technology. Who could forget hyperdrive?

Hyperdrives allow starships to travel faster than the speed of light, crossing space through the alternate dimension of hyperspace.

But the impact also reached the education world. While they don’t let you travel faster than the speed of light, technology such as tablets, hand-held devices, and smartphones have opened up a new world of learning for children.

Star Wars made an indelible mark on society and it continues with the new episodes. If your child has shown interest in star wars technology, tune in every week on the Star Wars YouTube page for exciting educational episodes featuring all things Star Wars science. May the force be with you!

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