6th Grade Language Arts Lesson Plans

Time4Learning is an online student-paced learning system covering preschool through middle school. It is popular as a sixth grade homeschool curriculum, for afterschool enrichment, for remediation, and for summer study. If you are just learning about Time4Learning, we’d suggest first looking at our interactive lesson demos.

The lesson plans below provide a detailed list of the language arts and language arts extensions, with brief activity descriptions and learning activity (LA) numbers. A sixth grade language arts overview, and additional related resources, are also provided.

Members often use this page as a resource for more detailed planning, to choose specific activities using the activity finder or to compare our curriculum with state standards.

Sixth grade language arts is organized into two large sections:

Language Arts Lesson Plan – 6th Grade Curriculum

Total Activities: 133

The student will demonstrate knowledge by determining the meaning of synonyms from grade level appropriate vocabulary, by correctly choosing a given word or phrase that means the same thing, in reading activities that incorporate explicit instruction and application.
The student will demonstrate knowledge by determining the meaning of antonyms from grade level appropriate vocabulary, by correctly choosing a given word or phrase that means the opposite, in reading activities that incorporate explicit instruction and application.
The student will be able to analyze and determine the correct meaning of a word, based on the prefix of the root word or how the prefix is used in the context of a passage.
The student will be able to analyze and determine the correct meaning of a word, based on the suffix of the root word or how the suffix is used in the context of a passage.
The student will be able to identify and select the appropriate homophone or word that sounds the same, based on the context of a passage which fits the best meaning of the given word or phrase.
The student will be able to identify and analyze the author’s use of idioms, based on the context of a passage and how these expressions are used in literal and interpretative information.
The student will be able to identify and determine the meaning of unknown words, based on the understanding of Latin and Greek roots.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying with extensive scaffolding and support, through think aloud prompts.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying with scaffolding and support, through think aloud prompts. with scaffolding and support, through think aloud prompts.
Use the reading comprehension process skills of summarizing, predicting, visualizing, questioning, and clarifying to independently read and comprehend texts with minimal think aloud support.
Develop summaries, paraphrase, or synthesize information from two or more literary or expository texts containing context clues.
Analyze and explain the impact of characters and settings within the plot of literary text(s), and how these relationships affect the central conflict.
Identify, summarize, or explain the main idea(s) using the supporting details in an expository text.
Identify, summarize, or explain the main idea(s) or theme(s) using the supporting details and symbolism in a literary text.
Distinguish between fact and opinion in an expository text or within news sources.
Read, interpret and make predictions using charts, graphs, diagrams, maps or other graphic representations.
Identify and distinguish between cause and effect in expository and literary texts.
Identify and use knowledge of the author’s purpose by analyzing how the literary technique of mood contributes to the comprehension of a literary or expository text.
Use knowledge, information, and ideas from literary texts, expository texts, or from multiple sources to make inferences about the text(s) (e.g., make inferences, draw conclusions, make generalizations, infer sequence of events, and infer a character’s feelings.)
Compare and contrast characters, settings, ideas, point of view, and/or plot within varied genres that includes figurative language such as metaphors.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of comprehension skills on grade level appropriate literary and expository passages, with questions that simulate a high-stakes assessment.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the literature. Authentic nonfiction literature is included.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections. Student uses prior knowledge and will analyze and evaluate to make sense of texts. Student will monitor his or her own comprehension and act purposefully when comprehension breaks down using strategies. Student will write for different purposes and write a variety of compositions based on practical and literary prompts and complete a research-writing project.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills. These activities have direct instruction, practice, and scored assessment.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the literature. Authentic fiction literature is included.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections. Student uses prior knowledge and will analyze and evaluate to make sense of texts. Student will monitor his or her own comprehension and act purposefully when comprehension breaks down using strategies. Student will write for different purposes and write a variety of compositions based on practical and literary prompts and complete a research-writing project.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the literature. Authentic nonfiction literature is included.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections. Student uses prior knowledge and will analyze and evaluate to make sense of texts. Student will monitor his or her own comprehension and act purposefully when comprehension breaks down using strategies. Student will write for different purposes and write a variety of compositions based on practical and literary prompts and complete a research-writing project.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a literature-based glossary.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading literature with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the literature. Authentic fiction literature is included.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections. Student uses prior knowledge and will analyze and evaluate to make sense of texts. Student will monitor his or her own comprehension and act purposefully when comprehension breaks down using strategies. Student will write for different purposes and write a variety of compositions based on practical and literary prompts and complete a research-writing project.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills. These activities have direct instruction, practice, and scored assessment.
The student will explore content through discovery and develop vocabulary through the use of a poetry-based glossary.
The student will achieve comprehension by reading poetry with emphasis on vocabulary and respond to the poems.
The student will use a variety of strategies to comprehend reading selections. Student uses prior knowledge and will analyze and evaluate to make sense of texts. Student will monitor his or her own comprehension and act purposefully when comprehension breaks down using strategies. Student will write for different purposes and write a variety of compositions based on practical and literary prompts and complete a research-writing project.
Through learning activities focused on recognition and application, the student will practice language art skills. These activities have direct instruction, practice, and scored assessment.

Language Arts Extensions Lesson Plan – 6th Grade Curriculum

Total Activities: 205
Demonstrate that sentences are composed of a subject and a predicate, and identify sentence fragments and run-on sentences.
Review and correctly punctuate the four types of sentences as declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory.
Identify pronouns, demonstrate agreement between pronouns and antecedents, and write with increasing accuracy when using pronoun objective and subjective cases, such as, “He and they joined me.”
Identify and correctly use action and helping verbs. Identify irregular spelling of forms of “to be, to do,” and “to have.”
Discriminate between transitive and intransitive verbs and direct and indirect objects. Recognize and use correctly such troublesome verbs as “sit/set; rise/raise; lie/lay.”
Identify and use descriptive adjectives and adverbs to enhance writing.
Identify interjections, conjunctions, and prepositions in grade-level written composition. Use prepositional phrases to elaborate ideas.
Identify and correctly punctuate dependent and independent clauses.
Use Standard English in grade level appropriate composition. Correctly use the following: “good/well; who/whom between/among; which/that/who.”
Use verb tenses correctly, including present, past, future, and perfect forms, and demonstrate parallel structure (consistent tense) in sentences.
Use commas in dates, city and states, and lists. Use commas in appositives and after introductory words and phrases, as well as with names in direct address.
Capitalize names of organizations, nationalities, races, languages, and religions, as well as titles of books, stories, poems, songs, and articles.
Use quotation marks in dialogue and titles, using grade-level vocabulary.
Identify and correctly use linking verbs with predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives.
Correctly identify the different pronunciations of the letter combination “ough”, as in; “rough, dough, plough, borough, cough,” and “hiccough”.
Correctly identify which syllable of a multisyllabic word needs to be stressed, and demonstrate understanding that the stress of a syllable affects pronunciation and can affect meaning. Identify multiple meanings of words, and understand how they can affect pronunciation.
Correctly identify prefixes and suffixes, and demonstrate an understanding of their meanings. —(The learner will read silently and aloud with fluency and accuracy).–>

Chapter Test: Reading Accurately – Extension

Identify the use of figures of speech in written text, including analogies, idioms, similes, metaphors, and hyperbole.
Demonstrate comprehension skills, such as distinguishing between fact and opinion, cause and effect, and fantasy and reality.
Correctly identify the main idea and supporting details of an entire text. Paraphrase and summarize text to aid in comprehension.
Demonstrate the use of a variety of reading styles and speed to fit different types of text, including poetry, novels, textbooks, instruction manuals, and newspapers.
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 1: Words from social studies, including continent, population, economics, migration, culture, suffrage, international, province, citadel, ethnic.
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 2: Foreign words commonly used in English, including touché, bona fide, status quo, incommunicado, faux, smörgasbord, al fresco, gesundheit, bon voyage, à la carte.
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 3: Words from mathematics, including variable, equation, inequalities, proportions, integer, volume, capacity, perpendicular, parallel, statistics.
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 4: Words from science, including conductor, soluble, energy, force, system, minerals, natural resources, hypothesis, vertebrate, invertebrate.
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 5: Words from the arts, including instrumental, vocal, scale, chord, melody, texture, value, form, balance, variety.
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 6: Words from technology, including word processor, software, hardware, font, icon, prompt, database, prototype, disk, virtual reality.
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 7: Words from language arts, including expository, figurative, thesis, prose, metaphor, irony, dialect, personification, theme, alliteration.
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 8: Words with interesting origins, including boycott, broccoli, vaccine, eureka, dandelion, chauvinism, macaroni, magenta, honeymoon, assassination.
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 9: Words with Latin parts, including “omnis” (omniscient, omnipotent), “annus” (annual, anniversary), “vita” (vitality, vitamin), “dict” (dictation, dictionary), “magnus” (magnify, magnificent).
Demonstrate increased vocabulary and enhanced language use. Unit 10: Acronyms, including “sonar, scuba, RAM, laser, radar, NATO, CARE, VISTA, NASA, UNICEF”.

Chapter Test: Reading & Vocabulary Skills – Extension

Correctly identify an author’s voice or point of view in a written selection, and determine if the selection was written in the first or the third person. Identify monologue and dialogue within a written selection.
Explain how an author’s use of formal or informal language (including the use of slang), as well as denotative and connotative meanings, can help to set the mood or tone of a selection.
Demonstrate understanding of an author’s use of flashbacks and foreshadowing.
Differentiate between an author’s use of literal or figurative language, including imagery, metaphor and simile, symbol, and personification.
Identify common propaganda techniques used in the media. Point out examples of false advertising in television ads for toys, and emotional versus logical arguments found in editorials and opinion pages. Determine whether they contain strong or weak arguments.

Chapter Test: Literature – Extension

Read a selected grade-appropriate novel, and demonstrate the use of the following reading strategies: ‘prereading skills,’ such as scanning bold headings and graphics and predicting story events; reading skills, such as making inferences, drawing conclusions, making generalizations; and ‘rereading’ for better understanding. Relate aspects of the text to your experiences.
Determine the reading level of a selection, and choose books that are at your level. Briefly describe these genres of literature: fiction, nonfiction, biography, and poetry. Select 25 books to read during the course of the year, with 4 of the books from the same genre.
Determine the defining characteristics of a speech, and read “Are Women Persons?” by Susan B. Anthony.
Determine the defining characteristics of fiction, including fantasy, mystery, science fiction, realistic fiction, and suspense.
Determine the defining characteristics of a biography, and read a biography of Marie Curie.
Determine the defining characteristics of an essay, and read “Advice to Youth” by Mark Twain.
Determine the defining characteristics of newspapers. Determine that an author’s purpose is to entertain, inform, or persuade, and relate an author’s purpose to specific details within selected articles of the newspaper. Compare editorials to the use of political cartoons in persuasive journalism. Identify bias.
Determine the defining characteristics of folklore. Compare folklore from the ancient cultures of the Israelites, Muslims, Japanese, and Chinese. Read to compare your culture to the cultures of others.
Explore universal themes in storytelling by comparing several versions of the Cinderella story, pointing out similarities and differences in the versions.
Determine the defining characteristics of poetry, including stanza, meter, iamb, line length, punctuation, rhythm. Use patterned poetry, rhyming poetry, couplets, free verse, concrete poetry, song lyrics, and/or sonnets.
Determine the defining characteristics of a play, and read a version of Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar”. Describe the ways sentence structure and patterns have changed over time.

Chapter Test: Genres of Literature – Extension

Use the steps of the writing process (plan, draft, write, revise, edit, print, and share) to create paragraphs and multiple-paragraph essays. Choose a topic and then choose to write to persuade, entertain, or inform.
Use the steps of the writing process (plan, draft, write, revise, edit, print, and share) to create a fictional short story that includes dialogue.
Use the steps of the writing process (plan, draft, write, revise, edit, print, and share) to create a response to literature.
Use the steps of the writing process (plan, draft, write, revise, edit, print, and share), and use multimedia to create an autobiographical story (e.g., the day you were born, before you started school, a typical day, your family, your friends, what you most enjoy and what you do best).
Use the steps of the writing process (plan, draft, write, revise, edit, print, and share) to write a poem.
Use the steps of the writing process (plan, draft, write, revise, edit, print, and share) to write letters for various situations, including business letters, e-mail messages, and envelopes.
Use the steps of the writing process (plan—including forming questions for investigation—draft, write, revise, proofread, edit, print, and share) to create a one-act play, correctly using theatrical vocabulary, such as stage, set, act, scene, cast, props, and sound effects.

Chapter Test: The Writing Process – Extension

Understand and correctly use the skills of note making, including the use of graphic organizers such as webbing, clustering, and outlining. Write and present an expository speech or persuasive argument (with supporting evidence), making use of technology to enhance presentation.
Determine the purposes for listening, including to gain information, to solve problems, to enjoy, and to appreciate.
Listen to learn by taking notes, organizing, summarizing, paraphrasing spoken ideas, and asking questions.
Write sequenced, concise, multistep instructions. Follow verbal multistep instructions.

Chapter Test: Speaking & Listening Skills – Extension

Research and report on careers in the field of language arts, to include journalism, library science, publishing, advertising, and theater (television, movies, video, and video-game creation).

Chapter Test: Careers in Language Arts – Extension

Consistently apply rules of spelling. Unit 1: Demonstrate the influence of other languages and cultures on the spelling of English words (etymology), including words from ancient Rome (Latin), 30 words, including infinity, hospital, peace, romance, bona fide, status quo, verbatim, library, asthma, sincere.
Consistently apply rules of spelling. Unit 2: Frequently confused word pairs, 30 words, including accept, except, affect, effect, principle, principal, course, coarse, flair, flare.
Consistently apply rules of spelling. Unit 3: Schwa + “r” word endings: calendar, terror, popular, liar, character, similar, warrior, calculator, behavior, vinegar.
Consistently apply rules of spelling. Unit 4: Schwa + “n” or “l” word endings, 30 words, including: gargle, warble, towel, guttural, ritual, damsel, bristle, perpetual, tussle, jostle.
Consistently apply rules of spelling. Unit 5: words containing “ie” or “ei”. 30 words, including: receive, ceiling, deceive, achievement, chief, wield, weird, sleigh, reins, beige.
Consistently apply rules of spelling. Unit 6: words with the endings: “-ant” or “-ent;” and “-able” or “-ible”. 30 words, including: tolerant, independent, brilliant, ignorant, efficient, believable, visible, edible, responsible, measurable.
Consistently apply rules of spelling. Unit 7: words containing variant spellings of the “sh” sound, 30 words, including: session, patient, nutrition, solution, politician, ferocious, fashion, social, especially, partial.
Consistently apply rules of spelling. Unit 8: use of mnemonic devices to spell words that are commonly misspelled, 30 words, including all right, satellite, separate, soldier, business, mayonnaise, playwright, conscience, unanimous, a lot, definitely, giraffe, handkerchief, jeopardy, laboratory, coupon, opportunity, prejudice, privilege, vacuum.
Consistently apply rules of spelling. Unit 9: words containing irregular plurals, 30 words, including: analyses, data, axes, diagnoses, oases, hypotheses, curricula, phenomena, stamens, strata.
Recognize grade-level sight words; 30 words, including: abbreviate, accent, narrate, quotient, psychology, knowledge, irritate, psychic, gnaw, excel.

Chapter Test: Conventions of Spelling – Extension

Language Arts – 6th Grade Lesson Plan – Overview

The sixth grade language arts program is made up of 133 learning activities organized in three sections. The sections are alternative teaching approaches which overlap in their teaching of language arts mechanics, reading skills, writing skills, spelling, and vocabulary. Many parents follow the sequence exactly as it is presented. Many rotate doing one exercise from each section.

The sixth grade materials begin with four chapters built in a highly engaging game show format that build vocabulary skills (28 learning activities), processing/reading strategies (8 learning activities), reading comprehension skills (30 learning activities),and test-taking skills (3 learning activities). These activities provide explanations not only of the principles but they will also explain to the children what they did wrong.

For instance, in the synonym section, the program will ask students to identify the synonym of “provoke”. If you pick “calm”, the program will explain that you’ve made a mistake by selecting the opposite, not the synonym. This helps students understand the errors that they are making while also teaching them more about the relationships of words. If you pick “scream” for the synonym of “provoke”, the program will explain that while there is a relationship between the words (i.e. while provoked, you might scream), scream is not the synonym, it is just a possible result of being provoked. An unrelated word or two is also provided as choices as well as “make angry,” the closest synonym. These exercises combine:

  • Multimedia instruction explaining the meaning of antonyms and synonyms, the meaning of the hundreds of words covered, and the nature of the mistake made
  • Multimedia practice to learn and reinforce the correct answer where definitions are read and heard multiple times in an educationally effective structure.

The next five chapters are integrated language art units constructed around Authentic Literature. These units build reading and language skills providing materials for before, during, and after each reading. The unit before reading helps build the interest in the story, invokes prior knowledge, and is usually a high amusing multimedia introduction These units integrate vocabulary, reading comprehension, grammar skills building, critical analysis, and writing skills. To teach writing, Odyssey Writer is provided as a way to organize thoughts in outlines or other graphical organizers, to write and self-edit writing assignments, and to save them for review. Themes of cultural and generational differences, survival, friendship, hard work, and determination are explored through literature. The reading assignments (the text is provided online) are excerpted from:

Note: Many parents have contacted us with interest in gathering materials in addition to the excerpted portions of the stories studied within the Language Arts section of the program. These materials DO NOT need to be purchased but if you are interested in doing so the links above will take you to the appropriate pages on Amazon.

The last nine chapters provide in depth exercises in all of the key language arts areas. They provide text-based online explanations of principles followed by online worksheets to reinforce the skills. The areas covered:

  • Grammar – 26 learning activities covering the mechanics of sentence structure (subject/predicate, sentence fragments, dependent and independent clauses), punctuation, parts of speech, pronouns, noun-verb agreement, adverbs and verbs (transitive, intransitive, tenses), and punctuation (commas, capitalization)
  • Accurate Reading – 6 learning activities focusing on the pronunciation of letter combinations, multisyllabic words, and affixes (prefixes, suffixes).
  • Reading and Vocabulary Skills -18 activities covering figures of speech, comprehension skills, main idea and details, various reading styles (poetry, novels, textbooks, manuals, newspapers), and content/origin specific vocabulary highlighting on Latin parts of words and acronyms.
  • Literature – 11 activities highlighting point of view, elements of mood and tone, writing (flashbacks, foreshadowing), literal and figurative language, and propaganda techniques used in media.
  • Genres of Literature – 22 lesson activities focusing on prereading skills (making inferences, drawing conclusions, making generalizations, rereading) and characteristics of various genres (fiction, non-fiction, biography, essay, newspaper, folklore, poetry, play)
  • The Writing Process -14 activities following the plan-draft-write-revise-edit-print-and share format within various genres of writing (paragraphs fiction, response to literature, autobiography, poetry, letter writing, and plays.)
  • Speaking and Listening – 8 activities highlighting the purposes of listening for information, solutions, enjoyment, and appreciation, organizing notes, paraphrasing, and summarizing speeches.
  • Careers in Language Arts – 1 research and report activity focusing on careers in journalism, library science, publishing, advertising, theater, television, game-creation, movies, and video.
  • Spelling Conventions – 27 activities featuring spelling rules, irregular plurals, variant spellings, word endings, commonly misspelled words, and grade level appropriate sight words

Scope & Sequence Copyright © 2016 CompassLearning, Inc. All rights reserved.

Lesson Activity Finder Tool

activity_finderThe lesson activity finder is one of the many helpful tools that Time4Learning offers its members. The activity finder is a shortcut that makes it easy for parents to preview lessons or find extra practice for their child.

Every lesson in the curriculum has a unique activity number, referred to in the lesson plans as an “LA Number.” These numbers can be found on either the scope and sequence pages or the lesson plans in the parent administration area.

The activity finder can be found in the lower left hand corner of the Student LaunchPad page. To use it, members simply log in to their child’s account, type the Learning Activity (LA) number of a lesson into the Activity Finder and click “Go” to open it.

For additional information, please visit our hints and help section, which gives more details about the activity finder.

If you’re interested in the sixth grade language arts lesson plans, you might also be interested in:

Lesson plans for other grade levels of language arts:

Other sixth grade subjects and topics:

Wondering how many lessons to have your child do each day? Our lesson planning worksheet can help you estimate.

Online Curriculum for Homeschool, Afterschool and Summer Use

Sign up for Time4Learning and gain access to a variety of educational materials, which will engage and challenge your child to succeed. Make Time4Learning a part of your children’s homeschool resources.

I want to Learn More about Time4Learning’s homeschool curriculum or how to use the program for afterschool enrichment.

Get Started!

No Contracts.
Cancel Anytime.

PreK - 8th

$1995  Monthly
Per Student

9th - 12th

$30  Monthly
Per Student