Homeschool High School Curriculum - An Overview

Online Courses for High School Math, English, Algebra & More!

Time4Learning established in 2004
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PreK - 8th Grade
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per month
$14.95 / month for each additional PreK - 8th student

High School
$30 / student
per month
Includes 4 Courses
Curriculum Uses
Curriculum Levels

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  • Online Curriculum for
    PreK to 12th Grades
  • 1,000+ Student-Paced Multimedia Activities
  • Language Arts, Math, Science & Social Studies
  • Interactive, Project-Based Activities
  • Detailed Reporting for
    Easy Record-Keeping
  • Lesson Plans & Teaching Tools for Parents
  • Lessons Correlated to State Standards

High School Curriculum

Time4Learning high school offers an online, interactive curriculum for ninth through twelfth grade that can be used for homeschool, afterschool and summer skill building. The high school curriculum correlates to state standards and is organized into courses that cover the subjects of language arts, math, social studies and science, plus two electives. Courses are parent-supervised, student-paced, and designed to help students achieve college and career readiness.

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Homeschooling High School with Time4Learning A Curriculum Overview

Time4Learning can be used with a broad array of student types, learning styles, and homeschooling methods. The majority of the families using Time4Learning are homeschoolers. Some use it as their primary curriculum, while others use it to supplement or as part of an eclectic approach.

Time4Learning's high school curriculum is standards-based and designed to help students achieve overall college and career readiness. The courses are presented within an automated, student-paced system that teaches the lessons, reinforces concepts, time-stamps online activities (for attendance), tracks progress, and keeps printable reports that can be turned into student transcripts or included with homeschool portfolios. The lessons combine multimedia lessons, instructional videos, printable worksheets, quizzes, tests and both online and offline projects that focus largely on developing higher order thinking and writing skills.

When homeschooling with Time4Learning, parents are considered the "teacher of record", and the home from which they teach is the "school." Time4Learning offers its members a suite of online tools, teaching resources, and homeschool support to help, but ultimately, it is up to the parents to review and grade their student's offline lessons & writing projects, compare Time4Learning to their state standards, and make sure all graduation requirements are met.

It is also important to mention that Time4Learning is a curriculum provider-- not a school. Therefore, Time4Learning cannot be accredited, nor can homeschooled students "graduate" from Time4Learning.

Do you have broader questions about high school? Visit our homeschool high school resources page for tools, tips and resources.

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High School Language Arts / English Course Overviews

The Language Arts curriculum is organized into four English courses that correlate to state standards, and involve many different aspects of the English language. Each high school English course includes writing practice, vocabulary development, reading comprehension and communication skills. In addition, students learn communication skills that will be needed both in class and in the workplace.

In high school language arts, students learn to analyze a variety of types of literature, from short stories and novels to nonfiction, manuals and instructions, drama, poetry, and speeches. Targeted vocabulary lessons build students' individual word skills as well as their understanding of nuances of meaning, idioms, and other types of figurative language. In addition, students learn writing skills through both short- and long-term projects. Writing, editing, and proof reading are all skills developed in the high school English courses, preparing students for writing in both college and in their future careers.

The high school Language Arts curriculum is organized into four English courses:

  1. English I - English I uses a combination of learning approaches to teach about concepts such as the elements of story: plot and setting, character, theme and conflict, narrator and voice. Students analyze short stories and two novels: The Old Man and the Sea and Farewell to Manzanar. They also study to include other types of literature including nonfiction, drama, poem, and myth. This course prepares students for further study of Language Arts in English II.
  2. English II - English II continues teaching the concepts of the elements of story: plot and setting, character, theme and conflict, narrator and voice. Each element was introduced in English I and is looked at in more depth by analyzing short stories and two novels: Of Mice and Men and The House on Mango Street. Studies will also include other types of literature, including nonfiction, drama, poems, and myths. This course will prepare students for further study of Language Arts in English III.
  3. English III - English III introduces and explores American literature. The course uses a chronological format to explore works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, folk tales, and drama. Students begin to form ideas about history, themes, and viewpoints from each period. Students will bring together what they have learned with the novel study of The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver. This course prepares students for further study of Language Arts in English IV.
  4. English IV - English IV examines works of British literature including works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, folk tales, and drama. The course uses a chronological format to and each chapter provides an historical overview to aid in understanding the themes of literature from that period. Students bring together what they have learned in the course with the novel study on Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. This course prepares students for further study of Language Arts in college level English.

For additional curriculum details, visit the high school English course overview page.

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In the high school English I course,
students learn how to use context clues
in a text to expand their vocabulary

In this lesson, students are asked
to derive the meaning of a word by
using context clues within a sentence

9th grade english lessons

High School Math Course Overviews

Math study in high school goes well beyond the simple arithmetic and pre-algebra learned in grades K-8. The high school math curriculum is organized into five courses designed engage students in practical, real-life math problems. Courses are designed to prepare students for mathematical applications in their career or in college, including preparing students for further study in STEM-related fields. Each course in Time4Learning high school math includes a combination of lessons, worksheets, tools, and assessments. In addition, Algebra I and Geometry classes include both online and offline projects.

The high school math curriculum is organized into five courses:

  1. Algebra I - - The concepts learned in Algebra I prepare students for Algebra II and Geometry. Beginning algebra students learn concepts through lessons and practice. Online and offline projects allow students to further develop their new skills in practical, real-life situations, building an appreciation for how Algebra can be used in life outside of school. The study of algebra teaches topics such as finding patterns, balancing equations, and using graphs, lines, and arithmetic to understand quantities or dimensions. It also includes the study of ratios, percents, and probability. After completing this course, students will be ready to move on to Algebra II or Geometry.
  2. Geometry - High school geometry builds on the concepts of symmetry, shape, and relations. Students learn to use tools, formulas, and theorems to determine dimensions, angles, volumes, and surface area. Offline projects allow students to practice in a hands-on manner by teaching practical uses for geometry that include building, measuring amounts and angles of wood for construction, graphic design, and more. After completing this course, students will be ready to move on to Algebra II or Trigonometry.
  3. Algebra II - Algebra II continues the study of algebra where Algebra I left off. Students revisit and build upon concepts from their earlier algebra study, broadening their understanding of functions, probability, matrices, graphing, sequences and series. Students solve equations, analyze and graph data, and learn and use theorems. Algebra II students learn concepts through lessons and practice. After completing this course, students will be ready to move on to study Geometry or Trigonometry.
  4. Trigonometry - Trigonometry is computational geometry. In trigonometry students learn to compute the sides of a triangle from the dimension of only one side and two angles. Students learn to use sine, cosine, and tangent to find the measures of a triangle. Students also learn vectors and vector operations. Trigonometry students learn concepts through lessons and practice. After completing this course, students will be prepared to study Pre-Calculus.
  5. Pre-Calculus - Calculus is the study of change. Pre-calculus allows students to extend what they have learned in algebra and geometry to answer more complex questions. In pre-calculus, students learn concepts through lessons and practice. After completing this course, students will be prepared to study Calculus.

For additional curriculum details, visit the high school Math course overview page.

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High School Science Course Overviews

Science courses at the high school level address literacy in the form of vocabulary, fluency, comprehension and writing. The science courses also help students to prepare for further study in college as they pursue careers in technology, medicine, engineering, manufacturing, and other related science fields. The courses are based on the principle that an understanding of science is necessary in the modern world and can be the key to using technology, making healthcare decisions, conserving our planet, and countless other facets of everyday life. And by applying principles to everyday life, the science curriculum encourages students to investigate, explore, experiment, and hopefully- to learn to love science.

The high school science curriculum is organized into five courses:

  1. Biology - Biology introduces the concepts of life on Earth and its interactions with both living and nonliving matter. Students investigate organisms such as animals, plants, viruses, bacteria, and protists through various methods of the scientific process. Students will also consider the interdependence of life within an ecosystem. This course prepares students for further study of science in Physical Science.
  2. Earth/space science - Students can expect to learn more about the earth, weather, oceans, the solar system, and space exploration in this portion of the course.
  3. Physical science - Covers topics like the scientific process, the structure of atoms, the periodic table, gravity, magnetism, and nuclear energy.
  4. Chemistry - Chemistry is the type of science that studies the composition, properties, and various forms of matter. This course also covers organic and nuclear chemistry, as well as the different types of bonding. Students explore chemistry by studying the atom, the combination of atoms in compounds, and interactions between matter and energy. This course prepares students for further study of science in Physics.
  5. Physics- Physics uses mathematics to investigate motion and its relation to force and momentum. Students explore the topics of energy, force, and motion throughout the chapters. Lessons teach students how to use Newton's Laws of motion, how to explore gravitational fields, how heat is transferred, and how electrical currents work. The course prepares students for further study of science at the college level.

For additional curriculum details, visit the high school Science course overview page.

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High School Social Studies Course Overviews

The study of high school social studies includes learning about many different disciplines. History, economics, geography, law, sociology, and anthropology are some of the important studies covered at the high school level. Authentic tasks, primary sources, and artifact lessons teach high school students to learn as the scholars do, using modern and historical resources. Our high school social studies courses are designed to help build an informed and balanced view of our interconnected world, while providing a strong background to assist in your student's overall college and career readiness.

The high school social studies curriculum is organized into five courses:

  1. US History I (pre-1850) - Students will explore the history of the United States from its beginning until the year 1850. The course covers such topics as the exploration and colonization of America, how America got its independence, how the Constitution was formed, and the reforms that took place along the way. This course prepares students for US History II, which will cover post-1850 history.
  2. World History - This course covers the beginning of civilization up to the present age. Chapters are broken down into time periods so that students can compare and contrast the influences and interactions between the different countries during different eras. Students will explore all aspects of a country's culture, including religion, economics, and politics.
  3. US Government / Civics - This course covers both US Government and Civics. Students can expect to gain a greater understanding of our government, its balance of power on federal, state, and local levels and how the election process works. Students will be asked to compare other systems of government and foreign policies to our own. This course prepares students for college-level study of history and government.
  4. US History II (post-1850) - US History II picks up where US History I left off. Students begin the course studying the year 1850 and working their way to the end of the course, which discusses life today. Topics found throughout the course include The Civil War, industrialization, World War II, American politics, and the 21st century. This course prepares students for further study of social studies at the college level.
  5. Geography - World Geography is the study of the land and the environments that make up the earth. This course teaches students about the physical and human aspects of geography, while also taking a closer look at eight different regions that exist across the globe. Students learn to use tools to make and read maps and learn the principles of geographic thinking. They study the world in terms of physical and human geography.

For additional curriculum details, visit the high school Social Studies course overview page.

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High School Elective Course Overviews

Time4Learning offers both Health and Economics / Personal Finance as optional elective courses at the high school level. Both courses are designed to give students real-life skills and important know-hows to promote a healthy, happy, and financially stable life, both in college and throughout their adulthood.

The high school electives include two courses

  1. Economics / Personal Finance - The economics and personal finance course introduces students to the basics of economics and the many facets of responsible money management. Students look at micro, macro and international economics on a global scale. Personal finance activities teach students how to balance a checkbook, avoid debt, save for home ownership, prepare for retirement, and perform investments using a program designed to simulate real stock market transactions. This course is designed to help students understand economics as a whole, and the importance of financial responsibility, both in college and beyond.
  2. Health - **This course contains sensitive materials pertaining to sexually transmitted diseases, healthy dating relationships, reproductive health, and family planning. It is strongly recommended that parents review the content before registering their students for this course.** High school health is designed to help students understand how physical and emotional health are related to a long life and overall well being. Using a combination of both online and offline projects, multimedia lessons, instructional videos, worksheets, and quizzes, students will be introduced to the topics of nutrition, stress management, substance abuse, relationships, family planning, medical conditions and diseases.

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High School Curriculum - College and Beyond

Time4Learning high school offers an online curriculum made up of courses that correlate to state standards. And because Time4Learning is not a school, it cannot be accredited. However, Time4Learning is used by accredited schools, and has printable reports that can be included by parents as part of a homeschool portfolio or student transcripts.

For homeschoolers who plan on attending college, accurate record keeping throughout the high school years is important. This can take the form of a more formal transcript, or a simple portfolio of your child's accomplishments.

Many colleges and universities require documentation to rank students alongside publicly and privately educated students applying for admission. Homeschoolers can easily put together a portfolio or transcript of the subjects their child has focused on in the high school years. A portfolio simply includes samples of the homeschooler's work, details of their accomplishments, and possibly letters of recommendation, and standardized test scores. A portfolio is beneficial for unschoolers, or those who have focused on a particular area of study during high school because it allows the student to showcase their particular talents and interests. According to the HSLDA, "Many colleges now routinely accept homeschooled students, who typically present ´portfolios´ of their work instead of transcripts".

A transcript, on the other hand, is geared toward traditional high school coursework. Homeschoolers can list their courses, course descriptions, and even grades received on the document. Most colleges and universities will readily accept a homeschool transcript, if prepared well. There are software programs and websites that can aid in the preparation of homeschool transcripts.

As the acting "teacher of record", it is up to the parent to compare Time4Learning with state standards to make sure students satisfy requirements for graduation. It is also the parent's responsibility to submit transcripts to the state in order to receive credit for their work. Because Time4Learning is not a school, students do not automatically graduate upon completing our courses. We can, however, provide families with the materials they need to satisfy graduation requirements.

Do you have broader questions about high school? Visit our homeschool high school information page for tools, tips and resources.

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