Homeschool High School Language Arts - English 3 Course

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High School Language Arts - English 3 Course Overview

Time4Learning offers an online, interactive, high school Language Arts curriculum that can be used for homeschool, afterschool, and summer skill building. At the high school level, Time4Learning is organized by courses rather than grade levels, so parents have the option of choosing any four as part of membership.

English 3 is one of four courses covering the Language Arts curriculum at the high school level. English 3 is taught using a combination of multimedia lessons, instructional videos, worksheets, quizzes, tests and both online and offline projects. The English 3 course is designed to prepare students for the English 4 course.

This page includes information about the material covered in the High School English 3 course, in addition to an overview of the high school program structure.

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Homeschooling High School Language Arts / English 3 Course Overview

English 3 is the third of four standards-based language arts courses provided by Time4Learning, and is a great addition to any homeschool approach. Materials are presented within an automated, student-paced system that teaches the lessons, reinforces concepts, time-stamps online activities (for attendance), tracks progress, and keeps printable reports that can be turned into student transcripts or included with homeschool portfolios.

The English 3 course introduces and explores American literature. The course uses a chronological format to explore works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, folk tales, and drama. Students begin to form ideas about history, themes, and viewpoints from each period. Students will bring together what they have learned with the novel study of The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver.

When homeschooling with Time4Learning, parents are considered the "teacher of record", and the home from which they teach is the "school." Time4Learning offers its members a suite of online tools, teaching resources, and homeschool support to help, but ultimately, it is up to the parents to review and grade their student's offline lessons & writing projects, compare Time4Learning to their state standards, and make sure all graduation requirements are met.

Below, you will find a brief summary the lessons covered in each chapter of the high school Language Arts / English 3 course.

Chapter 1 New World: 1400-1800

This chapter introduces students to the historical background of the years 1400-1800. The lessons are arranged in these headings, Historical Overview 1400-1800, Cabeza de Vaca and Native American Voices, Anne Bradstreet Poetry, Benjamin Franklin Texts, The Crisis, No. 1, Phillis Wheatley Poetry, Vocabulary: Word Consciousness: Synonyms.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Historical Overview 1400-1800 - Students will become acquainted with important historical events during the time from 1400-1800. They will read an assortment of texts containing information from the period. They will expound on how the period is mirrored in the themes, ideas, and values within the texts. They will then craft an assessment of the way history effects literature.
  • Cabeza de Vaca and Native American Voices - Students will read passages from the journal of Cabeza de Vaca as they investigate the author's purpose in a chronological text. Students will pen an analytical essay based on perusing matching passages from Native Americans. While reading they will search for different perspectives and scan for implicit and explicit beliefs.
  • Anne Bradstreet Poetry - Students will peruse and examine the poetry of Anne Bradstreet. They will look at the way her puritan upbringing effected her writing. They will look at how connotative and denotative meanings of words can enrich writing.
  • Benjamin Franklin Texts - Texts by Benjamin Franklin will be read and analyzed for the way history influenced the content and style of his writing. Students will look for the differences in inductive and deductive reasoning and investigate how reasoning was used in Franklin's text.
  • "The Crisis, No. 1" - Students will read and investigate Thomas Paine's "The Crisis, No. 1" looking for patterns in organization, language and word choice and the effect on the clarity and meaning. They will compose an essay looking at the influence these patterns on the text.
  • Phillis Wheatley Poetry - Students will read "To His Excellency General Washington" by Phillis Wheatley as well as his reply. They will investigate the way personification played a roll in the style, tone and diction, to bring forward the author's purpose in the piece.
  • Vocabulary: Word Consciousness: Synonyms - Students consciousness of words will be enriched by hearing the teacher express examples and non-examples of applicable synonyms and their peculiarities. Students will then show their understanding by writing enhanced text.

Chapter 2 America's Voice: 1800-1865

In this chapter students will learn the historical background of the years 1800-1865. The lessons are arranged in these headings, Historical Overview: 1800-1865, "The Devil and Tom Walker", "The Masque of the Red Death", "Self-Reliance" Excerpt, "Walden" Essays, Longfellow, Dickinson, and Whitman Poetry, "The Minister's Black Veil", Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Historical Overview: 1800-1865 - Students will become acquainted with important historical events during the time from 1800-1865. They will read an assortment of texts containing information from the period. They will expound on how the period is mirrored in the themes, ideas, and values within the texts. They will then craft an assessment of the way history effects literature.
  • "The Devil and Tom Walker" - Students will look at how Washington Irving used archetypes in his short story "The Devil and Tom Walker". They will analyze how the structure of this text and the historical characters identify with modern works.
  • "The Masque of the Red Death" - Students will investigate the tone, mood, style and sound of the language in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death" as they study the subgenre of allegory.
  • "Self-Reliance" Excerpt - Students will investigate "Self-Reliance" by Emerson inspecting the philosophical, religious, social, political, and ethical viewpoints shared. They will express their opinions about the arguments the author makes and use the text to backup those opinions.
  • "Walden" Essays - Students will read both essays on "Walden" by Thoreau and E.B. White while looking for similarities and dissimilarities in theme, style, and structure.
  • Longfellow, Dickinson, and Whitman Poetry - Students will investigate the poetry of Longfellow, Dickinson, and Whitman inspecting the literary devices, structures, and themes relating to how they influence the mood, meaning and aesthetic qualities of each piece.
  • "The Minister's Black Veil" - Students will read "The Minister's Black Veil" by Hawthorne inspecting the theme for what it says about life. They will use the text to support their findings.
  • Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth - Students will read passages from two important historical texts, "My Bondage and My Freedom" by Frederick Douglass and a speech by Sojourner Truth. They will examine the diction, tone and writing style of both these texts.

Chapter 3 Realism, Frontier: 1865-1915

Chapter presents historical background from 1865-1915. The lessons are arranged in these headings, Historical Overview 1865-1915, "A Dog's Tale", "The Outcasts of Poker Flat", "A Wagner Matinee", "The Gray Man", "The Little Regiment", Andrew Carnegie, Philanthropist, Functional Text: Obtaining a Passport, Vocabulary: Multiple Meanings, Idioms

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Historical Overview 1865-1915 - Students will become acquainted with important historical events during the time from 1865-1915. They will read an assortment of texts containing information from the period. They will expound on how the period is mirrored in the themes, ideas, and values within the texts. They will then craft an assessment of the way history effects literature.
  • "A Dog's Tale" - Students will investigate "A Dog's Tale" by Mark Twain inspecting the point of view, plot, character, and conflict. They will express their opinions in writing about the voice the author chose.
  • "The Outcasts of Poker Flat" - Students will examine "The Outcasts of Poker Fat" by Bret Harte looking at how the author used language to give effect through the use of allusions.
  • "A Wagner Matinee" - Students will study Willa Cather's "A Wagner Matinee" looking at how the author uses characterization and setting. They will examine the time frame and setting to see how well it fits with the development of the plot then compose a response to this piece.
  • "The Gray Man" - Students will read Sarah Orne Jewett's allegory "The Gray Man". They will check to see if the characters fall in line with the literary philosophical arguments. They will then craft an analytical essay outlining how they feel the author's perspective adds depth to the story.
  • "The Little Regiment" - Students will investigate "The Little Regiment" by Stephen Crane inspecting the use of descriptive, figurative and sensory words. They will then express their opinions about how these words give meaning and cause an emotional response from the reader.
  • Andrew Carnegie, Philanthropist - Students will learn about Andrew Carnegie and American philanthropist in this nonfiction passage. They will look at the structure of cause/effect text pointing out the associations between cause and effect. They will answer questions using this data, explain the main idea and give pertinent information to back it up.
  • Functional Text: Obtaining a Passport - Students will learn about functional text by reading a passage about how to get a passport. They will explain the reasons for and elements of functional text.
  • Vocabulary: Multiple Meanings, Idioms - Students enrich their understanding of multiple meaning words and idioms by hearing the teacher express examples and non-examples. Students will then show their understanding by writing enhanced text.

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Chapter 4 Depression, Reform 1915-1935

Students learn the historical background from the years 1915-1935. The lessons are arranged in these headings, Historical Overview 1915-1935, "A Rose for Emily", "In Another Country," "The Little Regiment", "The Four Fists", Ezra Pound and E.E. Cummings Poetry, Cullen, McKay, and Hughes Poetry, Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Fireside Chat, Careers and Compensation, Vocabulary: Analogies.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Historical Overview 1915-1935 - Students will become acquainted with important historical events during the time from 1915-1935. They will read an assortment of texts containing information from the period. They will expound on how the period is mirrored in the themes, ideas, and values within the texts. They will then craft an assessment of the way history effects literature.
  • "A Rose for Emily" - Students will investigate the way the author developed time and sequence in Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily". They will look at how flashback and chronological text are used to build the plot. They will then craft an analytical essay outlining how they feel flashback adds to the plot.
  • "In Another Country," "The Little Regiment" - Students will read two passages "In Another Country" by Hemingway and "The Little Regiment" by Crane while looking for similarities and dissimilarities in theme, conflicts, style, and wording. Study strategies will help them to understand these texts.
  • "The Four Fists" - Students will read the short story "The Four Fists" by F. Scott Fitzgerald. They will check to see if the characters are believable. They will then craft an analytical essay outlining how they feel the author's perspective adds depth to the story.
  • Ezra Pound and E.E. Cummings Poetry - Students will read passages from two authors, Ezra Pound and E.E. Cummings. They will examine the texts, noticing the similarities and dissimilarities in the structures, themes, wording and writing style of both these texts.
  • Cullen, McKay, and Hughes Poetry - Students will be introduced to the Harlem Renaissance by studying various poetry from that time. They will look at how clearly and how dogmatically the authors express their beliefs and thoughts. They will examine the texts looking for similarities and dissimilarities in the structures, themes, and wording in each of these texts.
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Fireside Chat - Students will revisit April, 1935 as they listen to Roosevelt deliver his famous Fireside Chat. They will inspect the text recognizing the surrounding events from the time in which it was given.
  • Careers and Compensation - Students will look at how data is organized in expository text and graphs. They will tell the main points by showing similarities and dissimilarities and giving brief explanations.
  • Vocabulary: Analogies - Students enrich their understanding of analogies and word relationships by hearing the teacher express examples and non-examples. Students will then show their understanding by writing enhanced text.

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Chapter 5 Modern Age: 1935-1960

This chapter gives the historical background of the years 1935-1960. The lessons are arranged in these headings, Historical Overview 1935-1960, "The Chrysanthemums", Carl Sandburg Poetry, The Bonus Army, Manufacturing a 14AP4 Picture Tube.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Historical Overview 1935-1960 - Students will become acquainted with important historical events during the time from 1935-1960. They will read an assortment of texts containing information from the period. They will expound on how the period is mirrored in the themes, ideas, and values within the texts. They will then craft an assessment of the way history effects literature.
  • "The Chrysanthemums"- Students will look at John Steinbeck's use of sensory language and imagery in "The Chrysanthemums". They will then investigate how symbolism gives meaning and causes an emotional response from the reader and then express their opinions on imagery adds punch to the theme.
  • Carl Sandburg Poetry - Students will look for the way symbolism is used in the poetry of Carl Sandburg. They will also study his style and how he uses language.
  • The Bonus Army - Students will inspect for similarities and dissimilarities in different media addresses on the same topic. They will boil down the concepts and come up with valid links within the texts.
  • Manufacturing a 14AP4 Picture Tube - Students will study an article explaining how a picture tube was made in 1939. They will scrutinize the text for information using charts, graphs and pictures.

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In the high school English III course,
there is an increased emphasis on
the development of writing skills

In this lesson, students are asked to
organize their ideas into an outline that
can be used to write a college essay

11th grade english lessons

Chapter 6 Experiment/Conflict 1960-1975

This chapter covers the history of the years 1960-1975. The lessons are arranged in these headings, Historical Overview 1960-1975, "The First Seven Years", "Son", "The Trip Back", "Raymond's Run", Television Advertisements, Hank Aaron Biography, Excerpt, "Journey", Vocabulary: Categorization, Salient Features.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Historical Overview 1960-1975 - Students will become acquainted with important historical events during the time from 1960-1975. They will read an assortment of texts containing information from the period. They will expound on how the period is mirrored in the themes, ideas, and values within the texts. They will then craft an assessment of the way history effects literature.
  • "The First Seven Years" - Students will inspect for literary elements including point of view, characterization, plot structure and epiphany in "The First Seven Years" by Bernard Malamud.
  • "Son" - Students will study "Son" by John Updike looking at story structure, time, sequence and the influence the structure has on the story.
  • "The Trip Back" - Students will find the cultural influences contained in "The Trip Back" by Robert Olen Butler. They will look at how literary devices can be used to uphold and add to the theme and main ideas of a work.
  • "Raymond's Run" - Students will study the use of characterization in Toni Cade Bambara's "Raymond's Run". They will then inspect the character development in the text by composing an analytical response.
  • Television Advertisements - Students will watch TV commercials looking for stereotypes, bias, and persuasive techniques in them.
  • Hank Aaron Biography, Excerpt - Students will read part of Hank Aaron's biography. They will then show their understanding of the facts, ideas and events by crafting a literary analysis using charts, maps, paraphrasing and summarizing.
  • "Journey" - Students will study point of view after reading Joyce Carol Oates' "Journey". They will look at how allegory is built into the story and it's elements. They will create an analytical essay detailing why the words an author chooses is important and looking at allegory.
  • Vocabulary: Categorization, Salient Features - Students assess and organize important vocabulary words and recognize their obvious characteristics by hearing the teacher express examples and non-examples. Students will then show their understanding by writing enhanced text.

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Chapter 7 Contemporary America: 1975-Now

In this chapter students learn about the years 1975 to now. The lessons are arranged in these headings, Historical Overview 1975-Present, CETI, "Litany", "Mrs. Perez", "Where Have All The Leaders Gone?" Excerpt, "Keepers of the Earth" Excerpts, Vocabulary: Word Origins/Cognates.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Historical Overview 1975-Present - Students will become acquainted with important historical events during the time from 1975 to now. They will read an assortment of texts containing information from the period. They will expound on how the period is mirrored in the themes, ideas, and values within the texts. They will then craft an assessment of the way history effects literature.
  • "CETI" - "CETI" is a nonfiction expository essay by Lewis Thomas in which students will study the inductive and deductive reasoning while taking a special interest in technical vocabulary.
  • "Litany" - Students will inspect the structure, style and theme and recognize the use of metaphor in "Litany" by Billy Collin.
  • "Mrs. Perez" - Students will study story structure and flashback after reading Oscar Casares' "Mrs. Perez". They will look at how story structure is linked to the author's style. They will then craft an analytical essay outlining how they feel flashback adds depth to the story.
  • "Where Have All The Leaders Gone?" Excerpt - Students will inspect passages, use the clues in the text to form ideas, and form opinions about the author's reasons for writing Lee Iacocca's book "Where Have All The Leaders Gone?". They will give a brief explanation of the main ideas without inserting their own bias.
  • "Keepers of the Earth" Excerpts - Students will read a selection of passages from Native American authors. They will analyze the information to discover the links and form opinions from the texts.
  • Vocabulary: Word Origins/Cognates - Students decode word origins and cognates by hearing the teacher express examples and non-examples. Students will then show their understanding by writing enhanced text.

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Chapter 8 Novel Study

In this chapter students will read the novel "The Bean Trees". The lessons are arranged in these headings, "The Bean Trees" Chapters 1-3, "The Bean Trees" Chapters 4-7, "The Bean Trees" Chapters 8-11, "The Bean Trees" Chapters 12-14, "The Bean Trees" Chapters 15-17.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • "The Bean Trees" Chapters 1-3 - "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver (chapters 1-3) will be studied by students with the aim of examining the tone, the author's style, the narrator's voice, and the point of view. They will also investigate how to create imagery using figurative language. They will then compose an analytical essay in response to these chapters.
  • "The Bean Trees" Chapters 4-7 - "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver (chapters 4-7) will be studied by students with the aim of examining the characterization. They will also investigate how how the characters are developed and how the author uses symbolism. They will then compose an analytical essay in response to these chapters.
  • "The Bean Trees" Chapters 8-11 - "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver (chapters 8-11) will be studied by students with the aim of examining the recurring motif and imagery. They will also investigate the characteristics of the genre coming-of-age and the way action is infused into the text through subplots. They will then compose an analytical essay in response to these chapters.
  • "The Bean Trees" Chapters 12-14 - "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver (chapters 12-14) will be studied by students with the aim of examining the theme and figurative language. They will also investigate the metaphors and the way foreshadowing can enrich the plot. They will then compose an analytical essay in response to these chapters.
  • "The Bean Trees" Chapters 15-17 - "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver (chapters 15-17) will be studied by students with the aim of examining the characteristics of plot structure. They will also investigate the recurring motif and how it is linked to the theme. They will look at the climax and resolution. They will then compose an analytical essay in response to these chapters.

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Chapter 9 Writing

This chapter takes students through the stages of the writing process. The lessons are arranged in these headings, College Application Essay: Plan, College Application Essay: Organize, College Application Essay: Draft, College Application Essay: Revise, Writing Mechanics: Editing Checklist, Writing Mechanics: Grammar and Usage, Writing Mechanics: Grammar and Punctuation, Writing Mechanics: Paragraph/Sentence Structure, Writing: Publishing/Presenting, Writing Application: Persuasive, Writing Application: Descriptive, Writing Application: Narrative, Writing Application: Reflective, Writing Application: Analytical, Writing Application: Response to Literature.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • College Application Essay: Plan - Students will gain proficiency in the planning stage of writing by working on a college application essay. They will analyze the various kinds of pre-writing, as well as ways to brainstorm.
  • College Application Essay: Organize - Students will gain proficiency in the organizing stage of writing by working on a college application essay. They will look at ways to get organized and the organization tools of the writing trade.
  • College Application Essay: Draft - Students will gain proficiency in the drafting stage of writing by working on a college application essay. They will investigate how to build a productive thesis statement, give supporting evidence and craft a conclusion.
  • College Application Essay: Revise - Students will gain proficiency in the editing and revising stage of writing by working on a college application essay. They will scrutinize their work for clarity, meaning, purpose, organization, voice, word choice, sentence structure and paragraph structure.
  • Writing Mechanics: Editing Checklist - Students will learn how to use an editing checklist by editing a passage for correct spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.
  • Writing Mechanics: Grammar and Usage - Students will learn how to use an editing checklist by editing a passage for correct grammar, and usage. They will pay attention to parts of speech, verb tense, and verb agreement.
  • Writing Mechanics: Grammar and Punctuation - Students will learn how to use an editing checklist by editing a passage for correct use of clauses, correct use of phrases, and punctuation. They will pay attention to colon, semicolon, dash, and ellipses.
  • Writing Mechanics: Paragraph/Sentence Structure - Students will learn how to use an editing checklist by editing a passage for sentence structure and paragraph structure. They will pay attention to sentence types, getting rid of run-on sentences, getting rid of sentence fragments and getting rid of dangling modifiers.
  • Writing: Publishing/Presenting - MLA and APA styles for title pages, margins, spacing, fonts, and pagination will be taught to students as they get ready to publish and present a written text. They will look at how well their graphics work, use an editing checklist and learn how it can be beneficial to have peers review your work.
  • Writing Application: Persuasive - Students will investigate the parts of a persuasive essay and then demonstrate their understanding by composing one. The parts of a persuasive essay include stating a position, giving evidence, examples, and logic as support for the argument, recognizing opposing arguments, and persuasive techniques.
  • Writing Application: Descriptive - Students will investigate the parts of a descriptive essay and then demonstrate their understanding by composing one. Descriptive essays include different expressive forms which involve precise techniques, literary devices and sensory descriptions which they integrate with figurative language, emotion, rhythm, dialogue, character, plot, and structure.
  • Writing Application: Narrative - Students will investigate the parts of a narrative essay and then demonstrate their understanding by composing one. The parts of a narrative essay include fictional, biographical, or autobiographical narratives that relate the chronology of events and explain their importance, and give the setting.
  • Writing Application: Reflective - Students will investigate the parts of a reflective essay and then demonstrate their understanding by composing one. The parts of a reflective essay include personal experiences, events, conditions, and concerns. It also looks at the similarities in events and broad themes which explain beliefs or generalizations. It also links events to general and abstract ideas.
  • Writing Application: Analytical - Students will investigate the parts of an analytical essay and then demonstrate their understanding by composing one. The parts of an analytical essay include building a thesis, developing a structure, gathering infallible data from sources, forming opinions, documenting your information, using technical wording, and forming a sensible conclusion.
  • Writing Application: Response to Literature - Students will investigate the parts of a response to literature and then demonstrate their understanding by composing one. The parts of a response to literature include showing that you understand the whole of the work, adding in an examination of the imagery, language and themes used in the work, and expounding on the author's use of styles and effects.

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Chapter 10 Research

In this chapter students will learn the steps in the research process. The lessons are arranged in these headings, Research Process: Topic and Plan, Research Process: Sources, Research Process: Note Taking and Organization, Research Process: Evaluating and Synthesizing, Research Process: Citations and Documentation.

Lessons in this chapter are organized into the following sections:

  • Research Process: Topic and Plan - Students will explore how to choose a topic and come up with a plan which is the first step in the research process. They will determine understandable questions for research and build an all encompassing plan which will utilize unique and discerning research techniques.
  • Research Process: Sources - Students will explore how to choose and assess sources which is the second step in the research process. They will locate different sources and assess the soundness of them taking into account their accuracy, bias and credibility.
  • Research Process: Note Taking and Organization - Students will explore how to write down and lay out facts which is the third step in the research process. They will learn several ways to take notes and different methods for organizing, classifying, categorizing, and sequencing facts.
  • Research Process: Evaluating and Synthesizing - Students will explore how to boil down data decide what is important to their topic which is the fourth step in the research process. They will learn how to build the text and use numerical data, how to include quotations, and how to use parenthetical citations without interrupting the stream of thought.
  • Research Process: Citations and Documentation - Students will explore how use documentation and citations which is the fifth step in the research process. They will be taught how to standardize their citations properly, and make sense of the legal and ethical reasons to avoid plagiarism and violating copyright.

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Time4Learning High School Courses - Program Structure

Time4Learning high school offers an online, interactive curriculum for ninth through twelfth grade that correlates to state standards. The majority of Time4Learning members use it for homeschool, although some use it as an afterschool alternative to tutoring, or for summer study.

High school is distinguished from the PreK-8th grades by an increased emphasis on higher order thinking skills, the effective combination of video with animation, and an increased number of writing projects designed to help students achieve overall college and career readiness. It is organized into courses that cover math, language arts, science, and social studies, with the optional elective courses of health and economics/finance also available.

Students use their own individual login to access Time4Learning's secure, ad-free learning environment. An automated system combines multimedia lessons, instructional videos, printable worksheets, quizzes, tests and both online and offline projects to teach the materials. The system also reinforces concepts, tracks progress, and keeps printable reports that parents can turn into student transcripts or include with homeschool portfolios.

In addition to our standards-based curriculum, Time4Learning members have access to a suite of online tools, lesson plans, teaching resources, and homeschool support to help them along their journey. Parents are considered the "teacher of record", and the home from which they teach is the "school." It is up to the parents to review and grade their student's offline lessons & writing projects, compare Time4Learning to their state standards, and make sure all graduation requirements are met.

It is also important to mention that Time4Learning is a curriculum provider-- not a school. Therefore, Time4Learning cannot be accredited, nor can homeschooled students "graduate" from Time4Learning. Visit our homeschool high school resources page for additional tools, tips and high school resources on this topic.

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